April 24, 2019

Animal Protection Zealots Intend to Sue Montana to Protect Canada Lynx

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While Maine and much of the eastern one-third of the United States waits in anticipation of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to magically fabricate a new subspecies of wolf, groups calling themselves conservationists have announced their plans to sue the state of Montana to stop a proposed wolf trapping season that begins this fall.

Maine has been under strict guidelines for trapping in so-called lynx occupied habitat due to an agreement reached as the result of a lawsuit brought against the state of Maine several years ago. That agreement is to remain in place until such time as the state can obtain an Incidental Take Permit to cover liability in the case of incidental trapping of lynx in traps not intended for lynx. Maine has an extremely good record for not incidentally killing Canada lynx.

However, that doesn’t seem to stop the anti hunting zealots at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who have announced their intentions to pile on ridiculous and unnecessary restrictions to trapping based on no other reason than politically driven agendas.

This all may become a moot topic should the USFWS become successful in its concoction of a made-up subspecies of “eastern” wolf. Make no mistake about it. The intent here isn’t about protecting any wolves as it is about destroying the trapping industry. An invented canine, strategically placed on the Endangered Species List throughout all of Maine and New England, would systematically and effectively put an end to virtually all trapping of larger game.

I doubt that Montana can fight and win a lawsuit as Maine’s lawsuit has set precedence, which leads me to conclude that offering the wolf trapping season in Montana was an act intended to foster a lawsuit of this kind. This is the direction all fish and wildlife departments have taken over the years. They intend to no longer manage for surplus harvest of any species and are actively promoting what they have affectionately embraced; non consumptive wildlife management.

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