July 15, 2019

New-Science Wildlife Scientists: Creations of Wellington House – Part I

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I thank God daily that there still exists in this country a few people who think independently; who refuse to blindly accept the “settled” theories, the many studies and the strategic lying of our string-pulled media without questioning. Without these people, surely by now America and the rest of the world would have been devoured by the New World Order lead by a One World Government headed by a dictator. These thinking people are slowing the process and keeping the promoters of the destruction of this country, with the goal of One World Government, somewhat at bay.

Recently, I have told many older friends to sit down and make a list of everything they could think of that made America great; the greatest nation on earth where everyone wanted a piece of the American Dream; where none dared rattle our cage or test our resolve. If we were to examine that list, then wouldn’t it make sense that in order to destroy the greatness of a country like America that all one need do is take each item and change or destroy it?

Unfortunately, with each passing generation, the list shrinks or is completely rewritten reflecting the changing mindset of the American citizen. But why? Is this change, at least from the perspective of those who can recognize it, a natural phenomenon? In other words, is it in man’s nature, that given to him by God, to willingly work at destroying inalienable, God-given rights and all that made America great? Or are there forces at work, out to destroy, item by item, everything that is on that list of America’s greatness and for what purpose would they do this? I hope to answer at least some of these questions to give you a better understanding of why a well-proven wildlife management plan, a plan that in my opinion belongs on the list of what made America great, is being systematically destroyed and replaced with new-science outcome based education. In outcome based education, one chooses the desired outcome and manipulates the data, even devising of false data, to achieve such predilection.

It’s been about 10 years now that I began to turn my focus of writing and researching to hunting, wildlife, wildlife management, the environment, Endangered Species Act and much of all the politics that go, unfortunately, hand in hand now with everything related to the outdoors. It’s easy to castigate “environmentalism” as the root cause, and one’s effort in that would be rightfully justified, but there has to be more to it. Environmentalism contains innumerable evils, which to the trained eye can be recognizable, but who or what is behind environmentalism and is it the same force that is changing the mindset of our young students through education?

Over the years of writing and researching on these topics, it became very clear to me that people just didn’t think (and I use that term very loosely) the same way as previous generations. I wondered how long this had been going on, but more importantly, why.

If I may take a moment to step back to a time in American history when settlers and appointees of governments and commercial establishments took from the resources of wild game until one day it was realized that all taking and no giving was not sustainable – meaning without some kind of restrictions and efforts on the part of man to conserve the resources, there soon would be none.

While not a perfect solution, over time, coupled with a desire of many to sustain viable wildlife species, the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation was crafted. It wasn’t long before the implementation of this working model restored game species as well as gave the outdoor sportsmen the opportunities for surplus harvests, without depleting the resource. This Model became the envy of the civilized world.

So then, why are we moving away from it and replacing it with contrary, faux science, driven by outcome based strategies that are not working and have led to sizable reductions in game herds and overwhelming increases in large predators; a direct competitor of the hunter/trapper?

To go along with the mentality that exists in wildlife management, that nature is self regulating, there exists a hatred toward man. Man is always perceived as the culprit, the one to point a finger at as the destroyer of wildlife. There is an incessant drum beat of: “the animals were here first”, that “there are just too many people” and that “man is encroaching on everything to do with wildlife” and ruining it; while seldom providing the proper documentation to support such claims. It’s easy to look at places like Westchester County, New York, a suburb of New York City, where on a recent trip along the Saw Mill River Parkway heading for the Tappan Zee Bridge, I witnessed more deer grazing along the highway and in people’s back yards than I saw for an entire week of hunting deer in the deep Maine woods.

I suppose it may be related to the person who calls a glass of water half empty rather than half full, but others see this occurrence and somehow see it as man’s fault. The poor deer/dear! If it is man’s fault for doing too good a job devising ways to protect and conserve deer and other wildlife, then I guess the shoe fits and must be worn. However, these same man haters fail to comprehend history of how things were in America before it was America.

Many have swallowed the pill and believe what they have been told that in pre-Columbian days the forests, hills and plains of this vast and beautiful country were teeming with wildlife everywhere. While there existed areas of abundant wildlife, it is fact that much of our wildlife in this country never inhabited vast areas until man settled and unknowingly or unintentionally created large expanses of wildlife habitat by growing lush crops, lawns, flower beds, working forests, etc. The result now being perhaps the largest populations of most wildlife at any given time in history in this nation.

So, is the problem, if there is one, that man is ruining everything for our wildlife? Or, is there a problem that man has done too good of a job? Consider a recent article found in the Wall Street Journal, written by Jim Sterba. Sterba says that we have done such a remarkable job of conserving wildlife that in many areas there are too many and that presents a host of problems, some of which are very expensive.

It is not my intent to get off on side discussions about wildlife management. It is my intent to point out what I perceive as obvious and I’m sure non existent for others; that our scientists graduating from our education factories are leaving with information that, when applied, appears to be more geared at destroying our wildlife, while ripping man to shreds, rather than improving on a pretty darn good, man-made, wildlife conservation model for management.

Why? Who is teaching these students such things and why? Does it begin once they reach college or are our students being “prepared” to enter the science world long before college graduation day.

Part II will take a closer look.

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