August 26, 2019

Neospora caninum: Seroprevalence and DNA detection in blood of sheep from Aguascalientes, Mexico

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Neospora caninum: Seroprevalence and DNA detection in blood of sheep from Aguascalientes, Mexico
A. Castañeda-Hernández, C. Cruz-Vázquez, L. Medina-Esparza

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of anti-N. caninum antibodies, the prevalence of the parasite’s DNA in blood and to estimate the association between seroprevalence and potential risk factors in sheep herds in Aguascalientes, Mexico. A total of 324 blood samples were taken from 13 farms and tested using ELISA in order to detect N. caninum antibodies and nested PCR was used to determine the prevalence of the parasite’s DNA in blood. The association between seroprevalence and some potential risk factors was estimated. The general seroprevalence reached 5.5% (18/324; 95% C.I. 3-8), ranging between 4 to 15% with the presence of seropositive animals in 61.5% of the farms; seroprevalence in ewes was 5.2% (15/286; 95% C.I. 3-8) while in rams it reached 7.9% (3/38; 95% C.I. 2-22). The prevalence of the parasite’s DNA in blood was 25% (81/324; 95% C.I. 20-30), with a range from 7.7 to 50%, with 84.6% of the flock with at least one positive animal. Were identified as positive to both tests the 3% of the animals probed (10/324; 95% C.I. 1-5) of which nine were ewes and only one ram. The agreement between tests was k= 0.12. No association statistically significant was found between seroprevalence and the risk factors considered in this study.

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Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite of animals. Until 1988, it was misdiagnosed as Toxoplasma gondii. Since its first recognition in 1984 in dogs and the description of a new genus and species Neospora caninum in 1988, neosporosis has emerged as a serious disease of cattle and dogs worldwide. Abortions and neonatal mortality are a major problem in livestock operations and neosporosis is a major cause of abortion in cattle. This review is focused on current status of neosporosis in animals based on papers published in the last five years. Worldwide seroprevalences are tabulated. Strategies for control and prevention are discussed.

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