October 23, 2017

Brucellosis And Wolves

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By James Beers:

It was 1957 and I spent a touch-and-go week in a St. Charles, Illinois hospital with a swollen spleen, swollen glands under my arms in a semi-conscious state. I was diagnosed with Brucellosis, called Undulant Fever in humans and my parents were worried that I wasn’t going to make it. The local newspapers did not cover this and my parents soon found out that our County did not have a Health Department and certain factions, like dairy farmers, were opposed to having one established. The doctor said I must have gotten it from “bad” milk (we bought all our milk from a store) or had somewhere been “exposed” to brucellosis. My folks knew I had been hunting in and around dairy farms that fall so everyone assumed I had somehow “picked it up” while hunting pheasants.

In spring of 2010 I was preparing Testimony for the Oregon State Legislature’s House Agricultural Committee on Wolves and particularly on the Diseases and Infections they contract, transmit and spread. As I composed a list of over 30+ such diseases and infections I discovered that wolves, like dogs, contract, carry and transmit Brucellosis. I never knew this and certainly 60 years earlier, no one mentioned this or likely even knew it. I remembered that, those fall days right before coming down with Brucellosis I had hunted with my dog and he was often very good at finding and retrieving pheasants that I shot. In those early kid days I would lavish the dog with praise when he was “good” and he would often lick my face as I squatted and scratched his ears with hands that often had cuts on them as I was praising him. THAT is where I got Brucellosis. Some of those cows in those Health Department-free days probably had Brucellosis and my dog probably had:

“contact with infected birthing tissues and fluids (e.g., placenta, aborted fetuses, fetal fluids, vaginal discharges). The bacteria can also be found in the milk, blood, urine and semen of infected animals.

Animals can get the bacteria by ingestion (oral), direct contact with mucous membranes (eyes, nose, mouth), or breaks in the skin. Brucella can also be transmitted by contaminated objects (fomites) such as, equipment, clothing, shoes, hay, feed or water.

Some animals are carriers; they will have the bacteria but show no signs of illness. These animals can shed the bacteria into the environment for long periods of time, infecting other animals in the herd.” (From The Center for Food Security and Public Health)

The Center for Food Security and Public Health goes on to say that:

1. “Brucellosis can affect sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Brucellosis can also affect rats and wild animals including deer, bison, elk, moose, camels, water buffalo, and marine mammals.”

AND

2. “Brucellosis causes reproductive problems (e.g. abortions, stillbirth, infertility) in most species of animals. Other signs can include arthritis in cows and pigs, mastitis and lameness in goats, and oozing skin lesions in horses (“fistulous withers”).”

NOTE: Under # 1. There is NO mention of Wolves or Coyotes that interbreed freely with wolves producing viable offspring and are for all practical purposes the Same Species, especially in their Disease and Infection capabilities and capacities. This is a reprehensible act of political correctness (to avoid the wrath of environmentalists) and a not insignificant breach of the Public Trust that withholds information of significant importance from those rural persons increasingly at risk due to the spreading presence of WOLVES. (Jim Beers)

The National Association of Public Health Veterinarians tells us that:

“Brucella canis is transmitted among dogs by mucosal contact with infected material. Vaginal discharges, semen, and fluids and tissues associated with birth and abortion contain the highest concentrations of the bacteria, but urine, blood, milk, saliva, and feces also contain organisms.3 Pups can be infected in utero, intrapartum, or during nursing. The infective dose in dogs ranges from 104 for the conjunctival exposure route to 106 for the oral route. Concentrations of 103 to 106 organisms per ml have been found in urine of infected dogs.2 Dogs can remain bacteremic for at least five years.”

In summary; dogs are wolves are coyotes. They contract, carry and spread a very serious infection (Brucellosis) that infects and debilitates humans; and additionally destroys livestock, big game, and pets. They can contract, carry and spread Brucellosis for “at least five years”.

WOLVES are the most effective and therefore most dangerous vector of the highly infectious Disease Brucellosis. Why is that? Because:

* Wolves roam over a far wider area that any other vector.
* Wolves can contract Brucellosis from livestock, big game, dogs, rats and coyotes, all of which they eat, attack and/or kill for one reason or another.
* Wolves that contract Brucellosis are extremely likely to frequent similar habitats and similar animals (cattle, wintering elk, moose giving birth, sheep pastures) as where they have contracted the disease thus exposing similar animals to “mucosal contact with infected material. Vaginal discharges, semen, and fluids and tissues associated with birth and abortion tissue, urine, blood, milk, saliva, and feces” that infected them and that “is being passed on in their blood, saliva, feces, mucous, milk, vaginal discharges that they leave behind as they roam chasing and killing animals similar to the ones that infected them”.
* Wolves roam, fight, play, sleep and feed in packs, all but guaranteeing that, like bats, what one gets – they all get.
* Wolves kill, eat and attack cattle, big game and dogs. They will tear out their prey’s rear end and often the fetus they carry thus exposing themselves to “Vaginal discharges, semen, and fluids and tissues associated with birth and abortion (sic, that) contain the highest concentrations of the bacteria.” They sniff, roll in and smell urine and blood as well as feces and saliva of infected animals, thus making them almost perfect 100% contractors of any Brucellosis-infected material wherever they encounter it.
* Wolves sneeze and deposit mucous material on plants and other items for an undetermined time. Wolves deposit feces for other animals to smell and/or to consume nearby plants that have become contaminated by infected wolf feces. Wolves leave blood at various sites that is smelled and licked by coyotes and dogs. Wolves leave saliva on items that dogs and coyotes smell, lick, pick up and even swallow. Wolves leave urine and vaginal discharges at various sites in their wanderings.

All of the above can transmit the Brucellosis bacteria from infected wolves to coyotes and dogs for further transmission (coyotes) and to carry back into homes and kennels (dogs). The bacteria can be deposited in pastures to linger on plants for consumption by livestock, or they can be given directly to animals that survive an attack for transmission to others. The bacteria can infect big game animals and their unborn young that survive an attack for later transmission to pastures and haystacks frequented by both big game and livestock.

And the beauty of all this is that the veterinarians won’t touch this with a 10 ft. pole; the academics say, “there is no research”; the state wildlife biologists’ say, “where is your proof”; and the federal “experts” that put the wolves there just remain silent and smirk: thus there is no problem and therefore no responsibility or liability. A federal bureaucrat can’t have a finer dream.

Jim Beers
15 February 2015

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Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC. He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands. He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC. He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority. He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.

Jim Beers is available to speak or for consulting. You can receive future articles by sending a request with your e-mail address to: jimbeers7@comcast.net

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  • Polly Ann

    Thank you thank you thank you! I just completed treatment for brucellosis. There are cattle on my land but I have no contact with them. The doc says that brucella bacteria can be airborne to some extent and ASSUMED that is how I got it. Sorry, I do t drink milk or eat uncured beef. I want them to isolate the bacteria to the species ( canis or melitensis etc) so I can have a better guess as to the vector/carrier animal. Seeing brucella and assuming cattle is the culprit is irresponsible. There are a LOT of coyote on our property and I have dogs. Cattle in the US are routinely vaccinated against brucella (keep in mind that, just like with humans, not all who are vaccinated become immune). Brucellosis is a reportable illness thus we should be working to identify the vector animal. I agree with you that research into wolf and coyote population is reasonable. Especially where there have been reported cases of brucellosis!