March 20, 2018

New Mexico says no to wolves, creating quandary for federal officials

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*Editor’s Note* – The author of this article states that the Feds “can go over the state’s head” but questions whether or not the Feds will do that. The answer is simple: Of course they will. They have a history of breaking laws and doing just as they damned please anyway. So, why act as though you don’t know?

When one considers all the corruption that has existed from the very beginning, from dishonestly crafting environmental impact statements to conform with the desired narrative of forcing wolf introduction, to illegally releasing cross-bred, mongrel, semi-wild dogs on private land in North Carolina, why would anyone suspect they don’t know what the Feds will do?

In North Carolina, state authorities demanded the Feds remove fake red wolves they planted on private land and still they refuse, even though the Fed’s actions are clearly illegal.

Not unlike North Carolina, the fake “Mexican” wolves of the Desert Southwest are almost as mongrel. And these clowns say it is necessary for genetic diversity. BS

The Feds have always hidden behind the claim that the Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires them to “recover” wolves. Odd, as well as corrupt, that the Feds wish to adhere closely to the ESA laws – actually, their own interpretation of them, and yet thumb their fascist noses at those calling them out when they have deliberately broken the other laws from the same ESA.

No, there shouldn’t be any questions about what the Feds are going to do in New Mexico or anywhere else they decide to force people to live with wolves. If it destroys the American Heritage, including the freedom to pursue life, liberty and happiness, these fascists have and will continue to carry on with business as usual.

We have created it, now we must live with it.


State officials have said they are unwilling to approve new releases until FWS updates its recovery plan for the wolf, which was written in 1982. Concerned about impacts to ranchers and elk hunters, they’ve pressed FWS for the total number of wolves it aims to restore to the landscape in the long-term. But the agency doesn’t have that number yet, and though it is updating the recovery plan, the process is likely to take at least 2 years.

Now, the federal agency must decide whether to release the wolves against the state’s wishes. Federal policy requires FWS to consult state agencies and comply with their permitting processes when releasing endangered animals from captivity, even when releases are made on federal land. But there’s one exception: If a state agency prevents the service from fulfilling its statutory responsibilities, the feds can go over the state’s head.

Source: New Mexico says no to wolves, creating quandary for federal officials | Science/AAAS | News