September 17, 2019

Ticks Cause of New Hampshire Moose Deaths

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But, people calling themselves biologists insist on using non scientific, nonsense about man-caused global warming to explain increased numbers of ticks.

A New Hampshire Fish and Game biologist is encouraging Granite State moose lovers to get involved in the fight against climate change so the species can continue to live here.

According to Kristine Rines, warm winters are causing parasites to decimate the moose population. In response, Fish and Game is considering cutting the number of available moose permits.

I wonder if these people even understand that there is a difference between weather and climate? The average Joe looks out the window and sees little snow and experiences temperatures this winter as being above normal. Because of brainwashing, they think what they are seeing is something called “global warming” – a political ruse designed to steal tax dollars and control human masses.

There is no real scientific evidence to support man-caused climate change. In reality, real science is showing that we are in a cooling trend and that trend may continue for several more years. This comes on the heels of a decade of warming. The weather outside today has little to do with climate change.

I also wonder if any of these scientists have actually done any research on the winter tick, or do they just echo the lies being fed to them that snow and cold will kill the tick? It is repeated, like a broken record, that to ease the mortality of moose (because environmentalists, anti-hunters, moose watchers, and brainwashed “biologists” think tons of moose for everyone to see from their vehicles is good) we need to have longer, colder, snowier winters. The duration of cold and the amount of cold is nearly impossible to achieve anywhere in the lower 48 states.

There are few scientific studies on the winter tick. Most of what exists is nothing but repeated theories perpetuated by environmentalist in order to further instill fear in people over a fake crisis called global warming/climate change. However, what studies that do exist, tell us that winter ticks have been around for a long time and are widespread, to exist in climates as warm as Texas and as cold as the Yukon.

The repeated myth that cold, snowy winters will kill the ticks and thus allow the populations of moose to grow, is not supported scientifically. Winter Ticks on Moose and Other Ungulates: Factors Influencing Their Population Size – William M. Samuel and Dwight A. Welch, tells us that there is not scientific evidence to indicate that the winter ticks alone kill moose. It is the existence of circumstances, combined with the existence of ticks and their quantities, that contribute to moose mortality.

Biologists and others cry out for the need of cold and snowy weather, when, in actuality, they may be seeking a death wish for the moose. Tick-infested moose, the result being loss of protective hair and anemia, are extremely susceptible to severe cold, especially the later in the winter it appears.

Samuel and Welch tell us also that in order for cold weather to have a negative effect on the winter ticks you need 6 consecutive days in which the temperature does not exceed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit. We simply don’t realize or refuse to learn that these ticks are extremely hardy and resilient. There are other weather related conditions that can be more effective in reducing tick infestation of moose.

We are told that in late summer, these ticks begin climbing vegetation. When a moose walks by, the ticks attach themselves to the moose for the long winter ride. The study showed that during this vegetation climb, if windy weather persists, the wind easily knocks the tick off the vegetation and then they must begin the long arduous climb back up the vegetation. If this persists, it can greatly reduce the number of ticks that get on the backs of moose.

What is almost never discussed when talking about ticks is that in order for the tick to survive, it needs a blood meal host, i.e. the moose. This tick does cling to other animals but moose are more susceptible to ticks because of poor grooming habits. Why then, with the tick needing a blood meal host, is it not discussed that perhaps we are trying to grow moose numbers to a population level that is simply to high?

It has been suggested that perhaps locating moose “licks” – a mineral or salt block – that contains a chemical to kill the ticks after moose feed from the lick. This may be a good idea or not. If we then essentially rid the country of winter ticks, what are the residual effects of the greater ecosystem? Do we know?

While growing moose or any other game animal to artificially high numbers, may have its benefits, maybe we are fight against Mother Nature instead of understand and working with her.

It is, however, idiotic and irresponsible to continue the mantra of climate change, climate change, climate change. We can blame climate change until we vomit but it will never address the scientific realities we face. The climate is always changing. It has always changed and it will continue to change. What then is the difference in how we are choosing to deal with winter ticks? I don’t think it’s that difficult after you are willing to be a scientist seeking truthful answers.

BUT DON’T GO LOOK!!

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