May 30, 2017

Rights Of Nations Superior To Rights Granted Subjects

Declaration of the Rights of Nations

SO WHO CREATED THE NATIONS? WHAT ARE THEIR RIGHTS IN COMPARISON OF CITIZENS SUBJECTS RIGHTS? IF YOU DON’T KNOW YOU’D BEST FIND OUT.

All Want Peace: What Must Be It’s Basis? by A Distinguished Publicist. Tenth Article. (New York Times)

The American Institute of International Law, at its first session, held in Washington on January 6, of this year(1916), under the auspices of the Second Pan-American Scientific Congress, unanimously adopted the five following Articles to be known as The Declaration of the Rights of Nations:

“Whereas, the municipal law of civilized nations recognizes and protects the right to life, the right to liberty, to which the Declaration of Independence of the United States adds the right to the pursuit of happiness, the right to legal equality, the right to property and the right to the enjoyment of the aforesaid rights, creating a duty on the part of the citizens or subjects of each nation to observe them; and

“Whereas, these fundamental rights, thus universally recognized, are familiar to the peoples of all civilized countries, and

“Whereas, these fundamental rights can be stated in terms of international law and can be applied to the relations of the members of the society of nations, one with another, just as they have been applied in the relations of the citizens or subjects of the states forming the Society of Nations; and

“Whereas, these fundamental rights of national jurisprudence, namely, the right to life, the right to liberty, the right to the pursuit of happiness, the right to equality before the law, the right of the nation to exist and to protect and to conserve its existence; the right of independence and the freedom to develop itself without interference or control from other nations, the right of equality in law and before the law; the right to territory within defined boundaries and to exclusive jurisdiction therein; and the right to the observance of those fundamental rights;

“Therefore, the American Institute of International Law unanimously adopts at its first session, held in the city of Washington, in the United States of America, on the sixth day of January, 1916, in connection with and under the auspices of the Second Pan-American Scientific Congress, the following five articles, together with the commentary thereon, to be known as the Declaration of the Rights of Nations.”

I. — Every Nation has the right to exist, to protect and conserve its existence, but this right neither implies the right nor justifies the act of the State to protect itself or to conserve its existence by the commission of unlawful acts against innocent and unoffending States.

2. — Every Nation has the right to independence in the sense that it has a right to the pursuit of happiness and is free to develop itself without interference or control from other States, provided that in so doing it does not interfere with or violate the just rights of other States.

3. — Every Nation is in law and before law the equal of every other State composing the society of Nations, and all States have the right to claim, and according to the Declaration of Independence of the United States, to assume, among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and of nature’s God entitle them.

4. — Every Nation has the right to territory within defined boundaries and to exercise exclusive jurisdiction over this territory and all persons, whether native or foreign, found therein.

5. — Every Nation entitled to a right by the law of nations is entitled to have that right respected and protected by all other Nations ; for right and duty are correlative, and the right of one is the duty of all to observe.

AND;

Law Of Nations § 32. It may reform the government. If any nation is dissatisfied with the public administration, it may apply the necessary remedies, and reform the government. But observe that I say “the nation;” for I am very far from meaning to authorize a few malcontents or incendiaries to give disturbance to their governors by exciting murmurs and seditions. None but the body of a nation have a right to check those at the helm when they abuse their power. When the nation is silent and obeys, the people are considered as approving the conduct of their superiors, or at least finding it supportable; and it is not the business of a small number of citizens to put the state in danger, under the pretense of reforming it.

§ 33. And may change the constitution. In virtue of the same principles, it is certain that it the nation is uneasy under its constitution, it has a right to change it. There can be no difficulty in the case, if the whole nation be unanimously inclined to make this change. But it is asked, what is to be done if the people are divided? In the ordinary management of the state, the opinion of the majority must pass without dispute for that of the whole nation: otherwise it would be almost impossible for the society ever to take any resolution. It appears then, by parity of reasoning, that a nation may change the constitution of the state by a majority of voles; and whenever there is nothing in this change that can be considered as contrary to the act of civil association, or to the intention of those united under it, the whole are bound to conform to the resolution of the majority. (22) But if the question be, to quit a form of government to which alone it appeared that the people were willing to submit on their entering into the bonds of society, — if the greater part of a free people, after the example of the Jews in the time of Samuel, are weary of liberty, and resolved to submit to the authority of a {sovereign} monarch, — those citizens who are more jealous of that privilege, so invaluable to those who have tasted it, though obliged to suffer the majority to do as they please, are under no obligation at all to submit to the new government: they may quit a society which seems to have dissolved itself in order to unite again under another form: they have a right to retire elsewhere, to sell their lands, and take with them all their effects. Self Govern. Self Determination. Diplomatic Immunity from the Monarch.. This is not gained by challenging their system.. Law of Nations; or, Principles of the law of Nature: applied to the conduct and affairs of nations and sovereigns –1750 – Emerich. de Vattel

Only those signatories or their Posterity can change their own property, the Nation/State.. Subjects can like it or leave it..

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