August 17, 2019

The Two Faces of Environmentalism

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A man who is a member of the National Parks Conservation Association, wrote: “The northern Maine of my childhood was a perfect wilderness. In the car, as we drove north, houses and businesses would disappear from the sides of the highway, and the woods would close in. They were dense and dark and appeared entirely wild. I imagined, as a child, that no human had ever before dared to set foot in them. No one but us, of course.”

And this: “As it turns out, from the summit of Mount Katahdin I was looking out over what would become Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. The area appeared then as it does now, and as it has for thousands of years: It’s a rolling green sea of pine trees, broken only by granite peaks and shimmering lakes. It looked the same to Henry David Thoreau, who described finding “a primitive forest, more interesting” than any other for “a thousand miles westward.” It looked the same to a young Theodore Roosevelt, who took his experiences in the Maine woods and turned them into a life dedicated to conservation.”

Along with: “Having left Maine….There is simply nothing like the woods of Maine left in the eastern United States….Miles of forest floor covered in a thick bed of pine needles. Stands of fir so dense you need to turn around and use your back to push through.”

And finally this little tidbit: “My grandfather taught me years ago that Maine’s environment doesn’t stay wild on its own; rather, it requires ceaseless effort from those who are dedicated to protecting the land.”

These quotes were authored by a man, who not only supported the National Monument, Katahdin Woods and Waters, but claims to have been an active participant in getting the job done.

What puzzles me, and which is part of the nonsensical, two-faced hypocrisy of Environmentalism, is how can any person, with a straight face write such wonderful words to describe his memories of what Maine meant to him and his family, and then turn around and actively participate in creating a park, hoping to bring in hundreds of thousands of people, cutting trees, building roads and other infrastructure?

I think there is one small part of what this author writes that might go unnoticed. In the beginning the author describes how, while driving further and further north, the woods grew ever more wild and dense, imagining that no human had ever stepped foot into these forests, or ever would – No one but us, of course.”

And isn’t that the real face of Environmentalism?

The wonders of “conserving” wild lands and forests!

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