November 21, 2017

Fewer Moose Permits Because Of Fewer Moose Collisions With Cars?

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George Smith writes, “A Portland Press Herald news story by Deirdre Fleming recently reported that collisions with moose are down 55 percent in the last 10 years. And that led DIF&W this year to eliminate moose hunting permits in three coastal WMDs.” This information evidently comes from the Portland Press Herald. Certainly, neither Fleming, Smith or the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) mean, or are suggesting, that MDIFW is now basing their moose management decisions, along with the allotment of moose hunting permits, solely on how many cars collided with moose and how many people died in the process? Are they?

Smith also writes, “DIF&W’s outstanding moose biologist Lee Kantar still maintains that we’ve got between 60,000 and 70,000 moose, a drop from 76,000 in 2013. I am skeptical, given the significantly fewer moose I spot in my travels…” Here’s a thought. Suppose that MDIFW’s Kantar is correct, mostly, in maintaining his belief that Maine has between 60,000 and 70,000 moose. And let’s suppose that Smith is correct that he sees “significantly fewer moose” and that is the case statewide. They both could be correct you know.

The terribly incorrect information might just be that there was not 76,000 moose in Maine in 2013, but perhaps there were 90,000 or more moose in Maine before the ticks began wiping them all out. Someone from the MDIFW made the statement that there were at least 90,000 moose in Maine.

 

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