July 22, 2019

More Moose Permits Fewer Moose Ticks – Connection?

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It’s difficult most of the time to separate what a person says or doesn’t say in a Media report from what the author is either required to say or is brainwashed enough they don’t know the difference. I think we are seeing some of this in an article in the Portland (Maine) Press Herald about Maine’s intention to increase the number of moose permits they will have available for profit.

Lee Kantar is the head moose biologist at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW). When the MDIFW began their mostly secretive moose study, I held out little hope that much good would come out of it due to the extent to which brainwashing by Environmentalism has infiltrated the fish and wildlife community and every level of existence.

None of that has changed, however, there has been glimmers of hope in scattered reports from the MDIFW. It appears that Mr. Kantar might even have come to understand that there is a correlation between the number of moose and the number of winter ticks that are a cause of mortality in the great beast community. Perhaps (I may be giving him the doubt on this one) he even has a better understanding of the life cycle of the winter tick…(I’ll leave that one with a question mark at the end)?…? (make it two)

Kantar says: “This year, there was lower reproduction in moose in some parts of the state. Winter tick does not kill cows, it kills calves. But winter tick does put enough pressure on cows that are carrying a fetus, and not all the calves survive.”

An admission that ticks are one cause of moose mortality. This is the first (that I have seen or read) of MDIFW admitting or better, explaining, how anything that negatively effects the reproduction cycle of the moose will negatively effect the sustainability of the herd. It isn’t just the blood sucking that causes the moose to drop dead from exposure or starvation.

Many parts of Maine have seen tons of snow on the ground this winter. This kind of snowfall also has a negative effect on moose and deer. This is where Kantar suggests he has a better understanding of the ticks than before: “The fall conditions drive the winter tick,” Kantar said. “Our expectation is that the tick count will be down, and that should translate into increased calf survival.”

It is during the Fall that ticks are “questing” – in search of a host body to hang out on during the long winter months. When conditions on the ground seriously disrupt this questing process, ticks die by the millions and thus the overall negative effects of the winter tick on moose are mitigated…at least in the short term. This is why Mr. Kantar is suggesting a good moose calf survival and a need to make adjustments to the herd growth and population.

However, the reporter just can’t leave the “Climate Change” myth out of her reporting: “But biologists hope that the incidence of winter tick is lower because snow came early last fall and the parasite thrives in warmer climates and conditions.”

My wish is that one day, just one reporter would do some homework about the tick and stop perpetuating the Echo Chamber of Climate Change. The winter tick does not thrive in warmer climates and conditions. If that were true, the winter tick would be “thriving” to our south where the climate is always warmer and the conditions the way in which ignorant climate change alarmist present it.

The echo chambers continue to falsely report that because Maine has warmer winters the tick is thriving, when, in fact, this has nothing to do with the growth and sustainability of the winter tick. Science has shown that it would take conditions found in the Arctic to actually kill the tick. Two things drive the survival of the tick and Kantar mentioned one of them.

One is the questing process. As I have already mentioned, when the process of climbing vegetation and waiting for a moose to walk by so they can hitch a ride is seriously effected, fewer ticks will complete their life cycles and will die.

The second condition goes hand in hand with the first – ticks being able to find a host ride. It is important and necessary for the tick to find a host. If conditions are favorable to find a host, but there are fewer hosts to latch onto, tick production is mitigated. I believe Mr. Kantar is attempting to learn the balance between how many moose results in a healthy, relative tick-free existence while making adjustments in line with conditions.

What appears to me as encouraging here is that Kantar’s adjustments in the issuing of moose permits is as close to real time adjustments as you can get. Often reactions by biologists are years too late, making it difficult to understand whether any actions were good or effective.

Here we have a case where the biologist appears to understand that probably the tick questing period was interrupted by early fall snow which should result in an increased survival rate of moose calves – depending on how destructive the winter has been in general. This kind of real time management, so long as that management is based on sound science and not Climate Change mythology, should be a terrific boost for the moose herd and these actions should provide us all with a healthier population of moose to enjoy.

Keep up the good work. Let’s hope it continues.

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