November 15, 2018

Maine’s Big Bucks: Getting Smaller as Number Harvested Declines?

*Update* – March 1, 2012 – I will add the updated chart below that includes data from 2008 which was not available at the time of the original posting.

*Editor’s Note* All the information in this post was compiled by TomRemington.com contributor, Richard Paradis of Maine.

In 2009 I did a four-part series entitled, “Does Maine Have a Deer Management Problem?” (find links to the other parts in the “Related Links” at the bottom of the page.) In this expose I examined information I had received from the Maine Antler & Skull Trophy Club. It was expressed to me at the time that the harvest of trophy (rack and body weight) bucks in Maine had not only been significantly reduced in numbers but that it was not proportional to the overall decrease in deer harvested. From the information I had available to me at that time, I was able to show that the number of trophy bucks harvested did, in fact, mirror the overall trend in deer harvest statewide.

With Richard Paradis’ time to put together trophy deer body weight data and make a comparison for 5 or the past 6 years, it appears that again, number of trophy deer harvested closely follows in proportion to overall harvest. While some may view this as bad (of course we all want more deer to hunt.), it should tell us that the health of the deer herd, at least in terms of size, seems to be not be effected or is having an effect on the overall health and size of the herd.

Folks have been wondering whether Maine’s big bucks were getting fewer (they are) and whether they are getting smaller (not appreciably according to this small set of data). The counts are from a review of the Biggest Bucks in Maine entries from the Maine Sportsman magazine from 5 of the past 6 years. What is obvious is that the bucks being taken are being killed further south in the state. I had always assumed that the end of the season was a more opportune time to get a big buck so hunting hard to the last day was a good plan. Maybe not so. Of course, the bucks lose weight as the rut goes into high gear so they will weigh a lot more on the first day of the season than the last day. The disparities between the numbers of entries in the five years is due to ties and the 2010 listing does not have dates with the top 10. I will try to look that up and fix it later on as well as uncover 2008 of the Maine Sportsman’s Biggest Bucks in Maine editions to see if there really has been a difference over the years.


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Grey Ghost Productions: “Turning Tail” Atlantic Salmon Movie Trailer

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Open Thread – February 27, 2012

Please use this open thread to post your ideas, comments and information about issues not relevant to the content of articles published on this web site. Thank you.

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Idaho Fish and Game’s Blind Ignorance

This morning I was reading the “Critter News”, an electronic news report that get sent to a small contingency of readers. The editor provided a link to a story in the Magic Valley news online (subscription). The title of the article is, “Decline in Hunting-license Sales Sinks Conservation Money”.

As I began to read, it was about 50 words into the story that this quote from Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s (IDFG) regional conservation officer Gary Hompland, appeared.

“Fishing licenses have stayed relatively steady as far as the numbers of licenses sold,” regional conservation officer Gary Hompland said. “Most of that, from what we can tell, is because we’ve had some really good salmon and steelhead runs the last few years.”

From this point on Hompland laments about the drop in hunting license sales. While it appears from Hompland’s perspective, fishing license sales is very cut and dry; lots of fish equals lots of fishing licenses sold. Evidently this same theory doesn’t hold true for hunting.

According to Hompland, the loss of hunting license sales is having a devastating effect on the budget at IDFG and evidently the reasons are varied and have nothing to do with a lack of game to hunt. Here’s the list of excuses:

1.) According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey information, hunting license sales have declined since 1975. So, it’s a trend but no reasons given as to what drives that “trend”.

2.) IDFG attempted to lesson the blow by stating three other states, Rhode Island, California and Iowa, as having a greater decline in sales than Idaho.

3.) A “dour economy” as it is called by Hompland.

4.) And, “changing demographics of hunters”.

5.) Lack of new hunter recruitment “like we used to”.

6.) More single-parent families result in fewer hunters.

All of these items seem to be contributing factors to the decline of hunting and evidently none of them effect fishing. But what’s even more transparently ignorant is to think that when it comes to fishing, it’s all about how many fish there are to catch but when it comes to hunting, it’s about everything else except how much game there is to shoot.

Idaho is not alone. Several states face budget problems and some of that is due to a decline in license sales. The state of Maine is one such state. As a matter of fact they formed a dreaded “task force” to study why nobody from out of state wants to go to Maine to hunt anymore. The task force acknowledged the fact that Maine’s deer population has disappeared, especially in those regions where the out-of-state hunters went for trophy game. Instead of working to deal with that problem, the opted, as I guess we are seeing here in Idaho, to not necessarily deny there’s a game problem but find every excuse other than that for the decline in hunting licenses sold.

Tom Remington

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Open Thread – February 25, 2012

Please use this open thread to post your ideas, comments and information about issues not related to the content of articles posted on this blog. Thank you.

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Spoof: Brain-Dead Teen, Only Capable Of Rolling Eyes And Texting, To Be Euthanized

I would suppose in keeping the content of this video I should tell readers that this in NOT a real story. It is a spoof, a parody if you will that attempts to drive home some of the negative effects that come from mobile devices that consume huge portions of people’s lives.

God, I can’t believe I actually had to write that.

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Occupy Occupy D.C. Activists Call on Congress to Conduct Oversight Hearings into EPA Grantmaking

Washington, D.C. – “Occupy Occupy D.C.” activists will gather just steps from the headquarters of the Environmental Protection Agency at noon on Friday, February 24 to demand that Congress hold oversight hearings about possibly politicized grants made by the federal agency, and related issues.

The need for hearings, first suggested two days ago by the National Center for Public Policy Research in light of EPA grants made to the Pacific Institute, currently embroiled in an ethics scandal, has been heightened by the EPA’s scrubbing of its public grants database on or around February 23.

“The EPA’s decision to remove information about grants made to the Pacific Institute from the public database, first revealed by the website JunkScience.com, immediately after the National Center for Public Policy Research filed a Freedom of Information Act request for information about those grants is suspicious,” said National Center Chairman Amy Ridenour.

The National Center is concerned that the EPA is making grants to organizations involved in policy advocacy, an inappropriate use of taxpayer monies.

“With our spiraling deficit, the last thing the American people need to pay for is someone else’s political mudslinging,” added David Almasi, executive director of the National Center for Public Policy Research and director of the National Center’s “Occupy Occupy DC” project. “Not only is politicized grantmaking a waste of taxpayer money, it is illegal.”

Activists will gather on Friday at noontime at Freedom Plaza (13th and Pennsylvania Avenue NW) to call for a series of oversight hearings over possibly-politicized grants made by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Occupy Occupy DC activists are asking Congress to review the grants made during the last two Administrations to make certain sufficient standards of objectivity are in place; to obtain the views of respected scientists as to whether the EPA grant program is focusing its resources in the most promising areas; and to examine the question of whether the grant program, at a time of massive deficits, is set at an appropriate spending level.

The National Center has obtained a five-week permit for Freedom Plaza to share Freedom Plaza with left-wing “Occupy D.C.” protesters. Since February 13, it has sponsored noontime events every weekday.

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The World Bank Off To Save the Oceans

Why in heavens name would the World Bank want to “save” the oceans? I’m mean, no, really? The World Bank proposes to bring together a montage of “countries, scientific centers, NGOs, international organisations, foundations and the private sector” groups to “save” the oceans.

Aside from looking to raise $1.5 billion, here’s a bullet list of goals:

* Coordinated global action to restore our oceans to health

* An unprecedented Global Partnership for Oceans

* To pool knowledge, experience, expertise, and investment around a set of agreed upon goals

* Raise at least $300 million in “catalytic finance”, meaning funds that would be used for technical assistance for key governance reforms

* Raise $1.2 billion to support healthy and sustainable oceans

* Rebuilding at least half of the world’s fish stocks

* Increase the annual net benefits of fisheries to between $20 billion and $30 billion

* Increase marine protected areas from 2% to 5%

At the end of the Brietbart article, we get a glimpse into what is really behind the World Bank’s initiative to “protect” and “save” the oceans.

In developing countries, one billion people depend on fish and seafood for their primary source of protein and over half a billion rely on fishing as a means of livelihood, Zoellick said.

For developing countries, including many island and coastal nations, fish represent the single most traded food product, and for many Pacific Island states, fish make up 80 percent of total exports.

“The world’s oceans are in danger,” Zoellick said. “Send out the S-O-S: We need to Save Our Seas.”

You can take this as the WB looking out for you and the people of the world to ensure food supplies or you can look at it as a means of being able to gain control over the oceans and as a result gaining control over the people.

It was former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who said, “If you control the oil you control the country; if you control food, you control the population.” Is this the plan?

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Open Thread – February 24, 2012

Please use this open thread to post your ideas, comments and information on issues not directly related to the content of articles published on this blog. Thank you.

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N.H. Boy Attacked By Coyote. Officials Conclude Rabies Pass On Poor Information to Public

*Editor’s Note* Below is a copy of a press release sent out by the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game about a boy that got attacked by a coyote. The department, for no other reason than because they think that only a sick coyote would attack a human, is warning everyone that the coyote is rabid.

As long as fish and wildlife officials insist on burying their heads in the sand and refusing to understand wild canine behavior, beyond the ancient talking points, they are irresponsibly putting people at further risk.

Teen Attacked by Coyote in Hopkinton, N.H.

CONCORD, N.H. – Fish and Game Department personnel are alerting residents of Hopkinton, N.H., to the likely presence of a rabid coyote, following an attack on a local teenager yesterday (February 22, 2012).

The young man was walking the family dog in a wooded area near his home when the coyote approached him. The dog ran away, at which point the coyote attacked the teenager. The teen defended himself, reportedly punching the coyote in the nose until the coyote left the scene. During the interaction, the teenager was scratched and possibly bitten by the coyote. The teen sought medical treatment, and is receiving a course of rabies shots as a precaution.

Though there are occasional reports of rabid wild animals attacking humans in New Hampshire, Pat Tate, wildlife biologist with Fish and Game, said that the coyote attack was highly unusual. “It’s the first time we know of that a coyote has attacked a person in New Hampshire,” he said. Tate noted that earlier in the week, a local dog was also attacked by a coyote, and required veterinary care. “We suspect that it’s the same coyote, and that the coyote is rabid, given the uncharacteristic aggressiveness of the attacks. For local residents, that means they should be aware of the presence of coyotes, and they should know the signs of a rabid animal.” He added, “This incident, scary as it was, gives us no reason to fear wild animals in general.”

Tate points out that it’s not that unusual to see a coyote at any time of day or night. “The species is spread out around the state. Seeing a coyote in woodland landscape, one that’s acting normal, is fine,” he said. Normal behavior, for a coyote, is expressing no interest in humans or pets. “If a coyote displays any interest in a human – whether friendly or aggressive – that’s unusual, and that’s when you need to be on alert.”

Martin Garabedian, chief of Law Enforcement for N.H. Fish and Game, says that Conservation Officers and Hopkinton Police Department personnel are in the area, looking for signs of the rabid coyote. “In the interest of public safety, when the officers find the animal in question, they will dispatch it and send it for rabies testing,” he said.

If someone sees a coyote, Tate recommends yelling at it to instill fear. Healthy coyotes will retreat when faced with loud noises or thrown objects. “Obviously, you never want to approach a wild animal. But if you are in a situation where you are outdoors near a coyote, shout at it, make sure it knows you’re a threat,” Tate advises. “If it comes at you, hit it hard on the head and snout.”

If Hopkinton residents see a coyote behaving aggressively, they are asked to notify Fish and Game Law Enforcement dispatch at (603) 271-3361.

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