April 23, 2014

Radio Interview With Ted Lyon, Author The Real Wolf

This is about a 12-minute radio interview with Ted Lyon, co-author of the book, The Real Wolf: The Science, Politics and Economics of Co-Existing With Wolves in Modern Times.

Radio Interview Link

“The Real Wolf” Sells 1,800 Copies in First Week

“I’m elated and very humbled,” Lyon said when he learned how fast the book has sold. “My co-author, Will Graves and I, along with the contributors to the book are extremely happy this book is already being read by nearly 2,000 persons and sales of the book have just started.”<<<Read More>>>

Visit The Real Wolf website.

The Outdoorsman Book Review: The Real Wolf

*Editor’s Note* – The below article appears in the Outdoorsman, Bulletin Number 54, Oct.-Dec. 2013. It is republished here with express permission from the author. Please honor the protection of intellectual property and copyright. The Outdoorsman is the leading publication of truth concerning outdoor issues. To the right on this webpage is a link to follow in which readers are encouraged to subscribe to the print publication. Money is necessary for the continued publication of this important work. Thank you.

The Real Wolf
The Science, Politics and Economics of Co-Existing with Wolves in Modern Times
Book Review by George Dovel

When Will Graves asked me if I would consider writing a chapter for The Real Wolf, which he co-authored along with Ted Lyon, my first reaction was that it would be a wonderful opportunity to provide factual information to countless people who have been bombarded with fairy tales about living with wolves.

But after learning the names of several bona fide experts from various fields who, like Graves, had already agreed to provide their facts, I felt that anything I added to the book would be coming from a researcher rather than an expert.

In late November of 2013, Ted Lyon sent me a manuscript of The Real Wolf and asked me to write a review in The Outdoorsman. When I took the time to read the manuscript thoroughly, I was amazed by the straightforward collection of facts presented without anger, apology or attempts at political correctness.

I agree with comments by Tom Remington in his “Foreword” that The Real Wolf is loaded with resources from several of the most renowned scientists, researchers, investigators, and historians the world has to offer. I also share Tom’s confidence that this book is destined to become the encyclopedia of wolf facts for readers who have never had the opportunity to read the whole truth.

Ted Lyon Did Not Believe Horror Stories at First

After briefly sharing his outstanding 37-year career as an attorney representing clients in more then 150 jury trials, Lyon said he always relied on the truth. Then he confided that he did not fully believe the horror stories he kept hearing about wolves until after he bought a second home in Montana and experienced that reality himself.

His background as an avid hunter, including a period long ago as an outfitter and guide, probably influenced the amount of time he spent researching and verifying the information he has collected. The fact that he reported FWS biologists providing false information about wolves, and later, state biologists in Idaho and Montana lying to support what FWS said, reflects his intent to report all of the facts.

The Real Wolf also includes documentation by experts other than scientists of frequent radical changes in what was considered the legitimate wolf species to be protected. For example, Jim and Cat Urbigkit documented the existence of the original Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf, Canus lupus irremotus, on their sheep range in Wyoming before the larger Canadian wolves were introduced.

Cat Urbigkit reminds us that they presented their information through the courts, and Federal Judge William Downes finally ruled that introduction of Canadian wolves was illegal. He also ordered immediate removal of all Canadian wolves that had been introduced two years earlier, along with their offspring.

But several days later he put a stay on the removal order until it was appealed. And several months later the new court held that FWS had authority to change the subspecies that was being preserved, and the charade continued.

Chapters by Arizona’s Laura Schneberger and Catron County New Mexico Wildlife Investigator Jess Carey are vital to explain why wolves that are crossbred with dogs and raised in captivity represent a special threat to livestock and humans. The calculated non-reimbursed losses for livestock in both locations should end efforts to continue the wolf transplants – but they haven’t.

Epilogue

On November 1, 2013, Idaho Gov. Butch Otter wrote the “Epilogue” to The Real Wolf. Part of that document follows:

“There have been few issues during my 40 years in public life that have provoked the raw passions of so many people from around the world as the debate over wolves. I was deluged with some of the nastiest, most disparaging, and truly hateful letters, emails and phone calls from well-meaning but badly misinformed folks, who saw wolves only as big beautiful dogs harmlessly pursuing their majestic lives in the trackless wild. Wolves are an essential and misunderstood part of the Rocky Mountain ecosystem, many argued, and we owe it to our Western heritage to enable wolves to once again roam freely in the Idaho wilderness.

“The problem is that wolves don’t stay put. Their enormous range, high reproductive rate and insatiable hunger for ungulates inevitably draw them out of the woods to interface with man. As their numbers spiraled far beyond expectations, so did the conflicts, and so did my determination to manage wolves as we do any other species – with an eye toward the bigger picture of a balanced ecosystem that includes man.

“I’m grateful to Ted and the many good people who feel a strong affinity for Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and the other states where wolves were another government-imposed challenge to overcome. It was a problem created by “conservationists” who speak floridly about the primal necessity of having wolves in our midst, but for whom the real goal is raising money and disrupting or shutting down such traditional multiple uses of public lands as grazing, logging, mining, and especially hunting. It was a problem created by “conservationists” who consistently move the recovery targets, forum-shopped for
a sympathetic judge, collected millions of taxpayer dollars to pay their lawyers, and looked for any opportunity to abandon their commitment to pay for our ranchers’ losses to wolves released in Idaho.

“Ted, and many others who recognize that reality, fought tough odds to turn the tide on the wolf issue. Now Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming are managing wolves – wolves that never should have been here in the first place. But since they are, the happy ending to this story is that the people most affected by their presence now are managing them in a way that’s far more balanced and reflective of the realities of today’s West. They will never be “our wolves,” but at least now we have a primary role in controlling their population and impacts.

“It’s my sincere hope that The Real Wolf will help open some eyes to the bigger problems with the Endangered Species Act – a once well-intentioned but incredibly flawed law that undermines the real interests and values of conservation by placing the well-being of humans and their livelihoods far down the food chain.”

Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter
November 1, 2013
(NOTE: The Epilogue that Governor Otter has supplied tells it ‘like’ it is in my opinion. Yet I remain concerned at his repeating our Fish and Game biologists’ standard phrase that they intend to manage wolves as we do any

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other species. I’ve been very close to this for a lot of years and I know of no place in the world that has ever been able to manage wolves as our wildlife managers do with other species.

When the ratio of wolves to elk – their primary prey species in Idaho – got higher than it is in any other place in North America, we needed to lethally remove at least 75%-80% of the wolves in those high density areas. Maintaining very few, if any, wolves for five years until recovery occurred was essential.

But now that our primary elk populations are in a predator pit from which they cannot recover, and wolves soon find them and drive them down each time they produce a few calves, we must initiate really aggressive control until elk numbers have reached the desired goal in each depleted area.
I am pleased that Gov. Otter has taken this step which will allow recovery IF he selects the proper individuals with the sole motive to lethally remove wolves with all of the tools at their disposal until our elk and deer populations have recovered.

I believe anything else would be a serious mistake at this point in time. – ED)

Dear hunter,

No matter what state you live in, I urge you to visit http://www.farcountrypress.com/details.php?id=575 – then read about The Real Wolf and order at least one copy.

The price is $21 for the Soft Cover or $30 for the Hard Cover and I know of no book of this quality for sale anywhere near this low price. Once you have had the opportunity to read it, I urge you to get a copy into the hands of your resource committee members, or at the very least, to the state legislators who represent you.

Thank you,
George Dovel

On Amazon: “The Real Wolf”

RealWolfCoverThe Real Wolf: The Science, Politics, and Economics of Co-Existing with Wolves in Modern Times – Paperback
by Ted B. Lyon and Will N. Graves

How have thriving elk populations of thousands dwindled to mere hundreds in just a matter of years? Author Ted B. Lyon asserts the wolf is at fault. He also blames the wolf for the rampant spread of infectious diseases among livestock populations and the decimation of wild deer, moose, sheep, and domestic animals alike. A trial lawyer with over 37 years of litigation experience, Lyon proves his case in The Real Wolf: The Science, Politics, and Economics of Co-Existing with Wolves in Modern Times. In this detailed yet easy-to-read essay collection, authors Ted B. Lyon and Will N. Graves investigate the majesty and myths surrounding wolves in the United States and offer a new, true picture of the wolf in contemporary America. The Real Wolf is an in-depth study of the impact wolves as a federally protected species have had on big game and livestock populations. Each chapter in the book is meticulously researched and written by authors and scientists who have spent years studying wolves and wolf behavior. Contributing authors Rob Arnaud, Dr. Arthur Bergerud, Karen Budd-Falen, Jess Carey, Dr. Matthew A. Cronin, Dr. Valerius Geist, Don Peay, Laura Schneberger, Heather Smith-Thomas, and Cat Urbigkit each describe a unique aspect of the wolf in the United States. The Real Wolf does not call for the eradication of wolves from the United States, but rather advocates a new system of species management that would allow wolves, game animals, and farmers to live in harmony.

*Note* I was privileged to be asked to write a book review of “The Real Wolf”. Subsequently it became the foreword for this book. If you would like, you can read a copy of that below: (this review has been slightly edited from this original submission.)

Book Review: The Real Wolf
The Science, Politics, and Economics of Co-Existing with Wolves in Modern Times
Ted B. Lyons and Will N. Graves and other contributions

It has been nearly 30 years since United States Government employees undertook steps to import Canadian wolves into Yellowstone and Central Idaho; much of that event done illegally. To pull it off, the greatest sales pitch, or con job, in U.S. History had to take place. Wolves were sold as something they were not. Wolf advocates deliberately lied[this has been changed to something more politically correct], brainwashing masses of people with images of the gray wolf as a “keystone predator”, an “indicator species”, a “flagship species”, and all wrapped up in descriptions of wolves “balancing nature” and “sanitarians” of the forests. This was all done for one purpose: to sell the people about introducing wolves into the Lower 48 States. After all, if people were reminded of the truthful history of wolves globally, they would not have fallen for the idea.

It has taken nearly 30 years to compile between two book covers all the facts to explain to the American people that they were lied[also changed] to about the wolf. Everything you need to learn about the truth concerning wolves, can be found in “The Real Wolf.” The Real Wolf is destined to become the encyclopedia of wolf facts, loaded with resources from some of the most renowned scientists, researchers, investigators and historians the world has to offer.

The Real Wolf presents hundreds of pages of documents, facts and real life stories about gray wolves, including over 450 references, footnotes and links to sources and facts.

What began in this country at least 100 years ago, a deliberate effort to change the minds of American children, cannot be reversed in one book publication, but as far as the repulsive fairy tales that have been told about gray wolves around the world, The Real Wolf is a strong first step. It should be the foundation of understanding the wolf and required reading for all wildlife managers and biologists.

For those always wishing they had at their disposal a comprehensive publication in which to share with others and increase their own knowledge of “real wolves”, The Real Wolf is certainly something to add to your library.

Some of my favorite researchers and scientists have contributed to this book: Will N. Graves, author of Wolves in Russia: Anxiety Through the Ages; Dr. Valerius Geist, a leading ethologist and professor emeritus University of Calgary; Dr. Tom Bergerud, the world’s leading authority on caribou; and Dr. Matthew Cronin, a research professor of Animal Genetics at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks.

The Real Wolf will teach readers of wolf history across the globe, wolf introduction in the United States, the more than 50 diseases wolves carry, how U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service alters science to fit agendas, how mongrel mutts are being introduced as pure wolves, the devastation wolves have had on other wild animals and private property depredating livestock and the unbelievable affect it has had on people, plus a whole lot more.

New Book Release: The Real Wolf

RealWolfThe Real Wolf
The Science, Politics, and Economics of Co-Existing with Wolves in Modern Times

by Ted B. Lyon
and Will N. Graves

edited by Linda Grosskopf and Nancy Morrison

foreword by Tom Remington

published by Ted B. Lyon

How have thriving elk populations of thousands dwindled to mere hundreds in just a matter of years? Author Ted B. Lyon asserts the wolf is at fault. He also blames the wolf for the rampant spread of infectious diseases among livestock populations and the decimation of wild deer, moose, sheep, and domestic animals alike. A trial lawyer with over 37 years of litigation experience, Lyon proves his case in The Real Wolf: The Science, Politics, and Economics of Co-Existing with Wolves in Modern Times. In this detailed yet easy-to-read essay collection, authors Ted B. Lyon and Will N. Graves investigate the majesty and myths surrounding wolves in the United States and offer a new, true picture of the wolf in contemporary America. The Real Wolf is an in-depth study of the impact wolves as a federally protected species have had on big game and livestock populations. Each chapter in the book is meticulously researched and written by authors and scientists who have spent years studying wolves and wolf behavior. Contributing authors Rob Arnaud, Dr. Arthur Bergerud, Karen Budd-Falen, Jess Carey, Dr. Matthew A. Cronin, Dr. Valerius Geist, Don Peay, Laura Schneberger, Heather Smith-Thomas, and Cat Urbigkit each describe a unique aspect of the wolf in the United States. The Real Wolf does not call for the eradication of wolves from the United States, but rather advocates a new system of species “management” that would allow wolves, game animals, and farmers to live in harmony. <<<More Information and to Purchase>>>

Gary Marbut Books

The Fourth Printing of my book Gun Laws of Montana, updated to 2013, is now available and shipping. To order, see the instructions at:
http://www.mtpublish.com/mp/GunLawsofMontana.html

For stores, trainers and others, there is a 40% discount for orders of 10 or more books.

Dear MSSA Friend,

I just published another book, an E-book on Amazon, Hunting Elk by Handgun, just in time for hunting season. Now I need customers and (hopefully good) reviews. The full title is:
Hunting Elk by Handgun, a Primer for Beginners, a Refresher for Others.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00F3MXVLU

For any hunter who ever thought about hunting big game with a handgun, especially for Rocky Mountain elk, this book is packed with information that will give readers the knowledge and confidence to take the plunge. Covering all essential aspects of gear and technique, from scouting to game retrieval, Hunting Elk by Handgun opens the door to a challenging method of hunting. Written by a veteran handgun hunter, this book details field-proven practices sufficient to inspire any prospective handgun hunter or refresh and improve the ability of any existing handgun hunter.

This E-book is formatted for Amazon’s Kindle, although Amazon has free apps for computers, tablets and smartphones. It can also be read with free Calibre software.

Please send this email on to your friends.

Thanks!

Gary Marbut, President
Montana Shooting Sports Association

Wolves in Maine Beginning in the 1600s

Perhaps readers will remember a 6-part series I did on wolves in Maine beginning in the 1600s. The majority of the information was taken from a book, “Early Maine Wildlife: Historical accounts of Canada lynx, Moose, Mountain Lions, White-tailed Deer, Wolverines, Wolves, and Woodland Caribou, 1603 – 1930, by William B. Krohn and Christopher L. Hoving.

I have taken those 6 parts and compiled them into one PDF file for free download and easier reading; along with some minor editing to make the reading flow a bit smoother. Please feel free to share this document should you deem it worthy. Thank you.

Please find that file and download at this link.

Book Review: Wolfer – a Memoir

wolfer
Wolfer – A Memoir
By Carter Niemeyer
Published by BottleFly Press
Copyright 2010 by Carter Niemeyer
ISBN-13 978-0-984-8113-0-4
ISBN-10 0984811303
Second Paperback Edition

For trappers, hunters, outdoor enthusiasts, animal lovers and anyone with any interest in the process of gray wolf introduction in the Yellowstone National Park and Central Idaho, I believe this book is a must read. I enjoyed it immensely and gained a different perspective about the author.

To be completely transparent about this book review, I have never met Mr. Niemeyer, the author, nor have I ever communicated with him, at least that I am aware of. I believe once I received an email from his wife suggesting I read this book. That was some time ago and it has taken me a couple of years to get around to reading it, mostly because of the recommendation of a friend.

When I first began reading the book, which sets the stage of a young boy growing up in rural Iowa, it didn’t take long to see that there were many similarities between Carter Niemeyer’s upbringing and young past in rural Iowa and mine in rural Maine, including the early deaths of our fathers.

Carter falls in love with trapping. It begins at an early age and his love for and knowledge of trapping grows with each turn of the page. His circumstances while growing up caused Carter to use trapping, the killing of animals, to pay his way in life. He never seemed to take much issue with killing most any animal for their resource, with the exception of the wild canines, excluding foxes.

In the book, I read where in his teen years, I believe it was, that Niemeyer shows his first unexplained affection toward coyotes and even displays hesitation in having to kill one; something that never is shown throughout the book, with the exception of the wild wolves.

After losing his father, Carter Niemeyer comes in contact with people who encourage him to go to college and through it all is presented with opportunities to work outdoors and especially take advantage of his trapping abilities, most of which he learned from people he grew up around.

Much of the author’s story of his trapping life isn’t all that much unlike many diehard trappers. Those around him, in this case his wife and children, have to put up with the long hours, hard work and rancid smells that get embedded into just about everything a trapper comes in contact with.

Eventually Niemeyer takes a job with the Federal Government in Montana and works for animal damage control (now Wildlife Services) through the U.S. Department of Agriculture. There he trapped and mostly killed predators that were killing and harassing privately owned livestock.

Things seem to change and Carter Niemeyer begins to morph into either someone different or into the man he really was inside, when he becomes involved in the Federal Government’s gray wolf introduction program. He teams up with Ed Bangs and the two of them travel into Canada, trap gray wolves, then release them in Yellowstone and central Idaho.

Carter Niemeyer comes across as a ballsy, stubborn and often arrogant man. From the book I gathered he was not afraid to stand up to anyone. A large chip grows and sticks firmly onto his shoulder. At times he doesn’t seem to understand that he is a turncoat; a man who willingly, nay, eagerly killed any animal threatening ranchers’ livestock, including the handful of wolves naturally re-habituating northwestern Montana, to one now bringing the most savage of predators, the gray wolf, into the lands surrounding some of the best ranching lands in the nation.

Niemeyer’s attitude toward these ranchers changes and throughout this book we find little good he has to say about any of them. His attitude becomes that of an elitist, self-taught authority on trapping and wolves. Pity the man who dared to stand up to him. He develops enemies.

The book is mostly well written and interesting enough to keep a reader’s attention. It’s a fascinating revelation of how one man can be transformed into a completely different person because of an animal.

From what I gleaned from the book, Carter Niemeyer, a good man, a great trapper, loses his way and forgets his past. His enthusiasm and learned dedication to whatever he attempts, makes him a prime target for being taken advantage of because of his skills as a trapper. But he prevails, always determined.

Pick up a copy, as I’m sure you will enjoy it. I hesitated because, to be honest, I’m tiring of the same old wolf wars and there’s little new that can be added to the debate. However, information I found in this book helps to show that the actual event of going to Canada to trap wolves and bring them back to the U.S. was extremely poorly planned and wrought with problems. I think, had it not been for Niemeyer’s determination for accomplishment, the wolf introduction may never have taken place. We can either thank him or blame him.

Out of five stars, I would give this book 4 stars.

Do We Learn From History?

Maybe more so if we studied it.

As is standard procedure, I was reading a book and the other day I came across the two paragraphs which I have included below. Not only did it strike me that what was written was about the struggles we have been and still do face in this country concerning middle class, balance of power, money corruption to influence society and political decisions, etc., but also that one might ask when was this written?

Was this book written about events occurring in 2013? How about 1913? 1813? Let me tell you this. The book was written in 1891 by A.T. Jones, titled – The Two Republics. But, the real shocker in this is that this is describing the struggles taking place in 146 B.C.

What do we learn from history?

And as these two classes were constantly growing farther apart, – the rich growing richer and the poor, poorer, – there ceased to be any middle class to maintain order in government and society by holding the balance of power. There remained only the two classes, the rich and the poor, and of these the rich despised the poor and the poor envied the rich. And there were always plenty of men to stir up the discontent of the masses, and present schemes for the reorganization of society and government.

Some of these were well meaning men, men who really had in view the good of there fellow-men, but the far greater number were mere demagogues, – ambitious schemers who used the discontent of the populace only to lift themselves into the places of wealth and power which they envied others, and which, when they had secured, they used as selfishly and as oppressively as did any of those against whom they clamored. But whether they were well meaning men or demagogues, in order to hold the populace against the persuasions and bribes of the wealthy, they were compelled to make promises and concessions, which were only in the nature of larger bribes and which in the end were as destructive of free government as the worst acts of the Senate itself.

New-Science Wildlife Scientists Available For Free Download

Dear Readers:

After composing the seven-part series, “New-Science Wildlife Scientists: Creations of Wellington House”, I took the time to neatly (with a little editing) put the seven parts into one 19-page document. It is now available at Tom Remington’s E-Book Library as a FREE download – available in 3 formats (PDF, TXT, and ODT).

Please visit this page and get your copy as well as share it with other people.

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