July 30, 2015

Maine Sportsmen, Retailers, and Business Leaders Join Forces on Hunting Economics Agenda

AUGUSTA, Maine, July 21, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — A group of local and regional leaders representing sporting organizations, small businesses and retailers announced a new partnership called Hunting Works For Maine today. The group formed to highlight the many benefits of hunting and shooting to Maine’s economy, noting that sportsmen and women are crucial drivers of in-state commerce. Speakers at the press conference pledged a more unified voice in support of Maine’s hunting and shooting heritage through this new partnership.

Source: Maine Sportsmen, Retailers, and Business Leaders Join Forces on Hunting Economics Agenda – Yahoo News

FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestLinkedInEmailShare

Remembering Ski Jumping History

My brother Bob (in photo on the right) and I decided to collaborate on a book in which we recalled, from our own perspectives, the years we spent growing up and becoming ski jumpers. We felt it a good thing to assist in the preservation of history of a sport that, at least in most states, has died.

We also decided that after writing the book, we would donate all proceeds to the Ski Museum of Maine and the Maine Ski Hall of Fame, of which Bob is a member.

This past Saturday, at a festival here in my hometown, Bob and I were at the Ski Museum of Maine booth, selling and autographing copies of the book. It was a very successful and enjoyable time. We met some old ski jumping friends and their families with some surprises along the way.

If you would like some more information about the book and would like to purchase a paperback copy or Kindle book, visit this Amazon link. You can also purchase a book through Barnes and Noble or at the Ski Museum of Maine store.

TomRemBook

Milt Inman Photo

A Book to Read; A Book to Give

I just finished reading Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?. It is a book by Thomas K. Remington published in 2014.

The book covers the history of wolves. It describes ancient references to wolves in European history and the early history of wolves as America was being settled by European farmers, ranchers and other rural settlers.

It is mainly about the recent “restoration” and “re-introduction” of wolves in the Lower 48 states. The politics and bureaucratic “shenanigans” (a politically correct synonym for lies, ignorance and self-serving hidden agendas) of the past 40 years are covered in a way particularly geared for the general public, those casually interested in the subject, and those wanting to expand their understanding of how we got to where we are today in order to figure out what must be done if rural American communities are to be safe, productive and vibrant nurseries for families and communities that have been the backbone of the Nation for 240 years.

Tom is, like the Founding Fathers envisioned running the country, a citizen with a sharp mind, a deep interest in the wolf travesty, and the gumption to put together a book for others to understand what so many strive to keep “un-understandable”. His observations and insights are geared to others like himself, that is the American citizenry. They are refreshing for me and should prove useful to many others.

I believe it is a book worth reading and certainly a book worth giving to others in our families, workplace, church and neighborhoods.

The book is available in paperback and Kindle on Amazon, paperback of Barnes and Noble, paperback and signed copies on his website at tomremington.com (Link with book cover in right column, under “Tom’s Library.)”

NOTE: This is an honest recommendation for which I am not compensated nor awarded any tax break by faceless bureaucrats or omnipresent politicians. You can take that to the bank.

Jim Beers
1 June 2015

Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?

For a signed copy

To order through Amazon

To order through Barnes and Noble

Legend of Grey Ghost Second Edition Now Available on Amazon

GreyGhostCoverMy latest book, The Legend of Grey Ghost and Other Tales from the Maine Woods, second edition, is now available for purchase on Amazon. It should be available on Barnes and Noble within the next few days.

Coming soon: Grey Ghost 2.0 and Other Tales

Early Orders for Second Edition Legend of Grey Ghost and Other Tales

My son and I are excited to announce the soon to be released Second Edition of The Legend of Grey Ghost and Other Tales From the Maine Woods. The book will be available for purchase soon on Amazon and other book sellers in paperback and electronic editions.

A very popular first edition, prompted us to do a few rewrites making the book an even better read. We think you’ll really enjoy it.

Order now for delivery when orders come in (approximately 2 weeks) and get 25% off the cover price of the book. Get started now. Click on this link and place your order.

SecondEditionPromo

Introducing – WOLF: What’s to Misunderstand?

SmallWolfCoverI would like to introduce to readers the release of my latest book: WOLF: What’s to Misunderstand? The book can be purchased immediately on Amazon here. You can visit my Author Page here for a list of all my books. The book is available in paperback and a digital version for your Kindle.

If you would like a signed copy, please visit my website and preorder right now. The expected delivery date to me of books is, December 22, 2014…if all goes well. You can order now or wait. As soon as I receive my books, I will sign them and ship them immediately.

Provided on the book page here on my website, I have included: “About the Book,” “About the Author,” and an “Introduction.”

‘When Man Becomes Prey’, by local author Cat Urbigkit

New predator book released
‘When Man Becomes Prey’, by local author Cat Urbigkit
by Lyons Press media release
November 9, 2014

Lyons Press is proud to announce the release of When Man Becomes Prey: Fatal Encounters with North America’s Most Feared Predators, by Cat Urbigkit ($16.95, paperback).

Sam Ives’s family set up camp in a Utah campground, cooked dinner, cleaned up and packed their gear away, and climbed into their multi-chambered tent to sleep. It was a great end to Father’s Day. Eleven-year-old Sam crawled into the smaller compartment of the two-room tent. Without his parents knowing it, Sam ate a granola bar and placed the empty wrapper in a pocket of the tent. Sometime during the night, a black bear entered the campsite, ripped open the side of the tent where Sam slept, grabbed the boy, and killed him. His parents heard a noise and got up to have a look around, but were unable to find Sam. Terrified, they immediately called for help and a search was quickly conducted, where Sam’s body was found about 400 yards from the campsite.

Unfortunately, Sam’s story is not uncommon—every year there are numerous reports of predator attacks on humans, many of them resulting in fatalities.

When Man Becomes Prey examines the details of fatal predator attacks on humans, providing an opportunity to learn about the factors and behaviors that led to attacks. The predators profiled in the book include black bears, grizzly bears, mountain lions, coyotes, and gray wolves—the first time all five species have been included in one volume. Compelling narratives of conflicts involving these top predators are accompanied by how-to information for avoiding such clashes.

Cat Urbigkit is an award-winning writer and photographer. She has written ten books, including Yellowstone Wolves: A Chronicle of the Animal, the People, and the Politics and Shepherds of Coyote Rocks: Public Lands, Private Herds, and the Natural World. She maintains the news blog, Wolf Watch [on Pinedale Online!], and contributes regularly to regional newspapers and other outdoors blogs. She lives in western Wyoming.

<<<Source>>>

Sneak Preview VI – Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?

Cover290In referring back to the statement of Dr. Johnson to the Montana Environmental Quality Council, Dr. Johnson states that Droncit is “100% effective” for getting rid of tapeworms in wolves with just one treatment. If that was so, why then did he say he gave “at least twice” the number of injections that a 100% effective worm-killing drug would do.

The World Health Organization says that: “Although the efficacy of praziquantel is highly reliable in almost all cases, the possibility of low residual worm burdens in some of the treated animals cannot be excluded, notably if mistakes of drug administration occur.” Perhaps “almost” 100% would have been more accurate to describe the effectiveness of Droncit and perhaps “at least” two doses of Droncit would be responsible, if one considers the seriousness of the spread of disease. Was that the case here?

What we don’t know from Johnson’s statement is what the dosages given were for each wolf. In researching information on Droncit (praziquantel), The Food and Drug Administration(FDA) tells us1 that dosages depend on the weight of the animal. Did Dr. Johnson give injections “at least twice” because he spread out the “100% effective” dewormer into two or more injections? If so, does that render the drug ineffective?

The FDA also warns that harm or death can result to an animal that is dosed too highly. Therefore we must assume one of two things. One, that there was only really one injection divided into two or more administrations of the drug, which I think is rational to assume that was not the case, when considering the World Health Organization’s explanation that human error in administering Droncit might play a role in the effectiveness of the drug. It just doesn’t make sense that it would be done that way. Or, two, all the wolves captured in Canada were given two or more doses of Droncit at full dosage and other anti-parasitic drugs before being shipped to the U.S. Without putting the wolves in danger by following the FDA recommended dosages of Droncit, a first injection would have been given to the wolves followed by a second dosage 30 days after. And I assume 30 days after for all subsequent injections. That is my understanding.

So, were the wolves kept in crates or holding pens in Canada for 30 days, or longer, so that “at least twice” Droncit could be administered to each wolf? I’ve never seen any records that would indicate that Canada kept captured wolves for 30 days or more, but as I have said, information and records of this event are sketchy at best, and perhaps intended to be that way.

The reason this is important is because we Americans have been told on repeated occasions that “it is extremely unlikely” that any wolves came into the United States infected with Echinococcus tapeworms, i.e. those of the “northern strain.” We know this “northern strain” was readily found in Alaska and Canada, as far south as the northern border of the United States. So, trapped wolves that were caught in Canada were caught in landscapes where the more virulent strain of Echinococcus exists.

If the wolves were not kept in Canada for 30 days or more, then were all the wolves brought into the United States put into holding pens so they could be dewormed? Dr. Johnson’s statement makes less sense the more we examine it.

If Droncit is 100% effective, then why the need to offer a statement that all wolves were given Droncit at least twice? Of what was the Montana Environmental Quality Council trying to be convinced of?

Complicating the issue is that we know some wolves were brought in crates from Canada directly to their release zones and let go . We have been told that all wolves were dewormed before entering the United States. But how can we be sure?

The records I have indicated above that I possess, I had a licensed veterinary doctor examine these records. The doctor had no information about why I wanted an opinion other than I was writing a book. The doctor sent me this statement:

Sneak Preview IV – Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?

Cover290The rigged system began to show its ugly head in more places than the Northern Rocky Mountains. With the combination of “best available science” being applied by government and non governmental agencies, along with creating a new paradigm about wolves and gaining new understanding of those poor “misunderstood” wolves, all the American people needed was an ignorant, activist, agenda-driven court system and diseased wolves and their avid adorers would be trampling o’er the ramparts of sensible Americans wishing to live in peace and quiet.

It wasn’t just the people of the Northern Rockies, i.e. the “Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem” that were having issues with wolves. In Arizona and New Mexico, authorities there went above and beyond the call of duty and actually (re)introduced a “Heinz-57” (that’s what I always called mutts growing up); a hybrid dog raised in captivity and someone at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided to use, once again, “best available science,” and like Frankenstein, crafted a Loup Garou and named it a “Mexican wolf.”

My guess is those responsible for destroying science because of a love affair with wolves in the Southwest probably were leftovers from the failed (re)introduction of another mongrel mutt into the Carolinas. That creation was known as the “Red wolf.”

When the United States passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973, an event that took place while President Nixon was getting caught being a crook and a thief, as all presidents are, almost immediately after that, the gray wolf was listed as “endangered” on the Endangered Species Act list in all of the Lower 48 States, with the exception of Minnesota. A growing “natural” conglomeration of wild dogs inhabited most all of Northern Minnesota. The efforts over the years to protect the gray wolf in the “Western Great Lakes” had allowed for the expansion of “misunderstood” wolves into Wisconsin, Michigan, and parts of some surrounding states. Soon, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would be removing the gray wolf from protection under the Endangered Species Act; or so we were told.

The lie put to the American people in 1994 was that when wolves in the Northern Rockies three Recovery Areas had reached 10 breeding pairs, or about 100 wolves, for three consecutive years, wolves would be taken off the Federal Government’s protection list and management turned over to the states.