January 16, 2018

Agenda 21 For Dummies

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Uh Oh! Scientists Say No Need to Panic About Untenable Claims of Destructive Global Warming

No Need to Panic About Global Warming
There’s no compelling scientific argument for drastic action to ‘decarbonize’ the world’s economy.

Editor’s Note: The following has been signed by the 16 scientists listed at the end of the article:

A candidate for public office in any contemporary democracy may have to consider what, if anything, to do about “global warming.” Candidates should understand that the oft-repeated claim that nearly all scientists demand that something dramatic be done to stop global warming is not true. In fact, a large and growing number of distinguished scientists and engineers do not agree that drastic actions on global warming are needed.<<<Read the Rest>>>

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My Study Suggests Republicans Cause Decreased Amounts of Snowfall

The title above suggests that perhaps the author has lost his mind, or to some they might think he is starting to get it back. Regardless, even I’ll admit that perhaps making the conclusion that republicans cause less snow is ridiculous.

In my “study”, I’m “suggesting” that my observations are that republicans in Maine took over the Blaine House and Congress. In the first full year of this political reshuffling, I also witnessed the fact that the Pine Tree State has seen very little snow. Therefore, I’m “suggesting” from my “study” that it must be republicans that cause decreased amounts of snowfall.

Utterly ridiculous isn’t it……..well, unless of course you are a global warming cultist. (It’s a given that GW cultists hate republicans too.)

Such should be the case in a recent “study” that “suggests” that increased levels of mercury in the Northeast caused a handful of songbirds to stop reproducing. According to JunkScience, the study is junk science.

All the researchers did in this first-of-its-kind study was to correlate mercury levels with claimed reproductive failure in a small number of wrens — without taking any other measurements or observations of any other substances and/or conditions. They set out to blame mercury and, lo and behold, they succeeded (sic).

So, the next time you are gazing at your bird feeder and see a wren or two, know that there would have been more wrens in your feeder if republicans hadn’t taken the political advantage in Maine.

Tom Remington

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Dealing With Deer Herd Rebuilding: Maine Sportsmen Groups vs. Utah Sportsmen Groups

Two states that face similar problems with dwindling deer herds are Maine and Utah. In Utah, efforts are underway to improve habitat but the sportsmen there recognize that those efforts are limited. What they do recognize is that the number one problem and one that they CAN do something about is reducing coyote populations that have driven the fawn survival rate to near zero.

In Maine much of the effort is talk and complaining that loss of habitat, loss of quality wintering habitat and severe winters are killing the deer and there are no serious plans to address an overblown coyote population; again something that CAN be done while implementing programs to deal with habitat.

Recently sportsman’s groups in both states have launched efforts to address withering deer herds. In Maine it was announced that a conglomeration of “outdoor partners”, mostly coordinated by the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine, were going to work with the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) to address the deer herd issue.

In Utah, efforts are already underway by similar “outdoor partners”, mostly coordinated by the Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife, to address the deer herd issue.

Below is a comparison of ideas and plans by each of the two groups. Please compare and then decide which one stands the best chance of actually accomplishing the goals of rebuilding a deer herd.

Maine: (According to the statement made by the “outdoor partnership”)

1.) Create a “network” of sportsman’s clubs.
2.) Provide access to information Online.
3.) Host meetings, conferences, and training seminars dealing with habitat management, trapping and predator hunting, and a variety of other topics related to deer restoration and management.
4.) Produce DVDs and other educational materials.
5.) Provide a place where hunters and landowners can share tips, tactics and ideas that may help others succeed at protecting and managing deer.
6.) Support the Maine Deer Management Network at the Legislature and in other political venues.
7.) Provide outreach.
8.) Provide information in the print media by providing feature articles on deer management and outdoor recreation topics.
9.) Coordinate closely with MDIFW to assure mutual progress in restoring and then maintaining healthy deer populations again.
10.) Manage habitat.
11.) Manage predators.
12.) Manage hunting.
13.) Eager to support Dept. efforts to reduce predation losses near deer wintering areas.
14.) Develop coyote hunting into the next big hunting activity in Maine by transitioning the coyote from varmint status, to the valuable, huntable furbearer resource.
15.) Envisioning a volunteer “Adopt a Deer Yard” program targeting coyote hunting near deer wintering areas by individual hunters, or clubs.
16.) Intending to be a resource that individuals can turn to for information on coyote biology, hunting tactics, available equipment, bait sources, etc.
17.) Find opportunities to strengthen the connection between hunters and the non-hunting public and be a resource where hunters can find information on the latest hunting regulations, including legislative changes as they occur.
18.) Stress the importance of ethical hunting behavior, encourage active participation in game law compliance, and help define the importance of hunting and trapping as a means of keeping wildlife populations at compatible levels.

Utah: (According to the most recent email on future plans)

1.) Continue the aerial gunning of coyote pairs in the spring with $470,000. Better efforts will be made to target paired coyotes.

2.) Hire 5 Full time – NON Biologist – Regional coyote trappers/trapping coordinators. Job requirements: proven track record of knowing how to kill coyotes, and teach and motivate thousands of sportsmen to join the effort. Every day, the job is to wake up and kill coyotes, and additionally teach other sportsmen how to trap, snare, and otherwise kill coyotes. These full time people would also coordinate county bounty programs, and help target and measure – hopefully – increased fawn survival. These coordinators will also come up with some new and creative efforts to get sportsmen out killing coyotes.

3.) Have some current DWR Employees participate in coyote control efforts while doing spring and fall counts, etc.

4.) See coyote $1 Million coyote bounty below

Since it is not in the current Governors budget submitted on December 8, the bounty money will have to come from Legislative leaders like Senator Hinkins and Okerlund, who take the Governors budget and tweak it. I also think the Governor, after the meeting in Cache, and having aides see the turnout at other meetings, and realizing the need, will be supportive. So, the new piece of the puzzle? see Number five below:

5.) With the help of Sportsmen, obtain $1 Million in additional funds to pay $50 coyote bounty. This would lead to 20,000 dead coyotes, a DRAMATIC increase in coyote kill.

Let me give you some numbers.

1.) Last year, after seeing the dismal fawn survival on 4 central Utah deer units – Pavant, boulder, beaver – the Director spent an additional $100,000 on coyote control

a.) Fawn Survival from 2010 to 2011 went from approximately 43 fawns per 100 to 62 per 100

It is estimated that there are 80,000 coyotes in Utah.

Last year it is estimated that the government professional trappers took 4,000 coyotes. This program would stay the same, but it would be better targeted in fawning areas.

$1 Million for a $50 bounty would result in 20,000 dead coyotes, plus all the coyotes taken by 5 full time coyote killers from the UDWR, plus all the coyotes taken by aerial gunning $470,000 in the spring on deer winter ranges.

I would like to point out some important differences between these two state’s ideas on how to rebuild a deer population. First, the proposals written about from Utah are actually those made by the fish and game director Jim Karpowitz. From most of the accounts I have read about Utah’s efforts, it appears that for the most part the fish and game department, Legislature, Governor and members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives, sportsmen and citizens, understand the importance of hunting to their state and are committed at all levels to do what is necessary.

Second, I do not believe that Maine has the same commitment from the fish and wildlife department, the Governor or the Legislature and definitely not the U.S. Congressional Delegation. Sportsmen are split and citizens need to be educated. For this reason, I believe it is the major steering factor in the proposals that I’ve outlined above from Maine.

Governor Paul LePage campaigned on the promise that he was committed to rebuilding Maine’s deer herd. And what has transpired to date that has resulted in any effort to that end? I am not an advocate to fund the MDIFW with general fund taxpayer money. If Maine and the governor honestly are committed to the rebuilding of the deer herd to keep a vibrant industry providing jobs and upholding traditions and heritage, the value of investment would be realized and the Governor and Legislature would find the money to kill a lot of coyotes, reduce bear populations, protect wintering habitat, etc.

I’m not suggesting throwing money at a problem. The Governor must demand change and accountability for any state investment in rebuilding the deer herd. One can argue and spin the information anyway they so choose but the fact is the current management plans for deer failed miserably. Blame it on winter, blame it on habitat or predators, the realization is there are no deer left in many of Maine’s locations. Therefore, the plan fails simply because it doesn’t deal with these issues in a realistic manner. Winters have been around in Maine for longer than MDIFW and loggers have cut trees for centuries, and we still can’t deal with those two issues?

Whether you are from Maine or Utah or points in between, you decide from the information that I’ve provided which state has the biggest commitment to herd rebuilding and which plans have a better chance at seeing real results.

Tom Remington
 

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Climate Alarmists Still Beating Their Drum. 2011 Coolest in Over Decade.

From JunkScience.com comes an AP report that states: ““Global temperature in 2011 was lower than in 1998,” NASA climate scientist James Hansen admits in the GISS report. However, he adds that nine of the 10 warmest years on record have occurred in the 21st century, and that 2011 was cooled by a moderately strong La Niña.”

Does anyone remember taking science classes in grade school? Does anyone remember one of the first things we were taught? I didn’t think so. We were taught that in scientific experiments there always needs to be constants. Otherwise, what is there left to compare change to?

As shameful and disgusting as it is, people around the globe have been forced into being skeptical of any data put out by any climate scientists. There is so much money and politics behind climate science, the corruption renders news reports, like the one linked to here, as completely laughable. Why should we believe any of their crap?

But, beside that, consider the poor science in and of itself. In this report, these scientists are attempting to convince people the world is warming at a rapid rate and of course, even without any proof, they blame it on carbon dioxide. They base their conclusion of a rapidly warming globe on temperatures that are “above the average”.

What they fail to tell us are two extremely important items that render their conclusions something even an 8th grade science teacher would give a student a poor grade for. Climate scientists base their average temperature on records kept for the past 132 years. To a 5-year-old, 132 years seems like a long time but in climatological ranks, 132 is barely a blink of the eye.

Therefore, my 8th grade science teacher would question my conclusions as to how I obtained an “average” temperature, especially if I was trying to convince the teacher it applied to the planet since day one. I might have gotten a passing grade if I had explained that having only records for 132 years, it would be unreliable to trust my average extended out over millenniums.

The second issue involves the equipment, locations and methods of temperature taking over the 132 years. If a scientist could not have used the exact same locations, under the exact same conditions, using the exact same equipment, collecting data using the exact same methods, can it honestly be totally reliable scientific conclusions? Shouldn’t there at least be asterisks attached to certain data to explain differences?

Climate science is too young with far too many unanswered questions to be making brash statements and providing unsubstantiated conclusions about our climate, what’s causing any change and what direction it is headed in.

Please, continue the research but give us a friggin break on the political sheep dip!

Tom Remington

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Alaska is Chillin’ and More Snow Rope Artwork

A report coming to sunny Florida from Aniak, Alaska is that the temperature there was -55 degrees Fahrenheit. Nice! Aniak is on the Kuskokwim River northeast of Bethel.

Below are some more photos of Alaska’s icy trees near Anchorage, along with more “snow ropes” and a bit of snow art around the shrubs and bushes.


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington

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Is Wind Energy About Clean, Alternative Energy or Greasing Palms and Crooked Politicking?

Hat tip to Richard Paradis for providing the information for this article.

Maine is like many states that have been bombarded with the construction of intrusive, environment-destructive wind turbines, all hiding behind the image of providing alternative energy, lowering energy costs and saving the planet. Those who have had the nasty turbines planted in their back yards are finding out that all the promises made about how quiet and unobtrusive they are were false. In addition, while the entire efforts were billed as a cost effective alternative to carbon polluting oil and coal, over time we are finding out that much of the goings on behind providing funds to promote more wind energy, is nothing more than political paybacks by the Obama Administration from the 2008 campaign. With a new election coming this year, what kind of palm greasing can we expect?

From the book, “Throw Them All Out”, by Peter Schweizer, on page 94 we discover that Obama gave $115 million in taxpayer money to a wind energy company First Wind. People of Maine, Utah and New York in particular are familiar with First Wind.

The chart below shows a listing of people who were large contributors and/or bundlers to the Obama presidential campaign in 2008. For Maine residents, take notice that former Gov. Angus King and now owner of Record Hill Wind, received $102 million in taxpayer money to build his wind farms.

The center column shows the energy companies, i.e. wind energy, these donors own. In the right hand column is the amount of tax dollars kicked back to these donors by the Obama Administration after the election. So it’s all about clean energy is it?

I would put into action exactly what the title of the referenced book says: Throw Them All Out!

Tom Remington

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Alaska – Cold and Snowy. More Than Normal?

Below are some photographs depicting some of the cold and snow in the Anchorage area. Last week I received one report that Valdez, Alaska, a coastal town of just over 4,000 people that sits east of Anchorage, currently has 321 inches of snow. Make no mistake about it, that’s a lot of snow. However, according to Valdez websites, the average annual snowfall is about 360 inches. It’s still early in the winter season though.

And, this morning I heard on the news that Nome, Alaska was having difficulty getting heating fuel into the town because of the cold. The report said Alaska was currently experiencing the coldest winter in 40 years. In parts of the winter, Nome’s average daily high is 5.7 degrees.


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington

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