September 2, 2014

Bill Hoppe: Eye of the Hunter (Video)

The Realities of Limiting Bear Management Tools

Driving down the freeway in the wrong direction, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and most of their non thinking, brainwashed followers, are working feverishly to stop hunting. In Maine they’ve chosen another attempt at ending hunting bears with bait, hounds and traps. And in their campaign to deceitfully convince the Maine voter that bears shouldn’t be baited, hounded or trapped, the radicals continue to present wrong information that in states where they have banned these hunting methods, bear populations have remained stable. HSUS will never convince voters about THEIR idea of ethics and hunting. HSUS is moving toward a head-on collision.

Once headed in the wrong direction, some states are looking to reverse the trend from when they banned baiting or hounding or trapping bears as they cannot control the bear populations in their states.

Let’s peek into what’s going on in other places now having to deal with bear problems.

In British Columbia officials there have been forced to kill 240 black bears between April and August of this year alone.

Since April 2014 there have been 7,314 calls to Officers about black bears and they have attended 1,062 of those calls. That number is much higher than the number received for grizzly bear sightings in the province, there were 229 calls made over the past four months, with 46 of them attended by officers.

In Wisconsin, officials there have stepped up the number of bear permits to issue all in an effort to reduce bear populations in hopes of mitigating conflicts between bears and humans.

The DNR says the bear population continues to rise in northwestern Wisconsin. That means more conflicts between bears and people in areas that become increasingly residential. Now the DNR is increasing the number of bear hunting permits to decrease those conflicts.

We also discover from a report filed by Deirdre Fleming, in Maine’s Portland Press Herald, that in at least two states that banned or limited the methods of hunting bears, not only has the bear populations risen, in Massachusetts the population has gone through the roof.

In Oregon, where voters approved a measure to ban the use of baits and hounds in bear hunting in 1994, the black bear population has increased by 40 percent. In Massachusetts, where a ballot measure to ban hounds and traps in bear hunts passed in 1996, the bear population has skyrocketed by 700 percent.

As traffic passes by HSUS going the wrong way, it doesn’t deter them and their followers of spewing false information. In a report I filed a couple of days ago, we saw where one follower condemned the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) because they didn’t have a specific study to prove that baiting bears plays no role in the health and habits of black bears. As was pointed out in comments left by readers, MDIFW has been studying bears in Maine for 40 years. During that time they have collected perhaps more data on bears than any other entity. One would think that in 40 years biologists would have taken notice of changes in population growth and average bear weights that don’t coincide with proven science of weight and reproduction variances due to natural conditions.

The fact is now very clear to voters. HSUS has no data to support their claims about black bear management. And now, the realities of what is taking place in state after state across this nation, where limits were put on methods of harvesting bears, is hitting home destroying the claims made by HSUS and their blind mice followers. All HSUS has left is arguing hunting ethics and that has never been a successful argument to end hunting.

Perhaps if HSUS wants to discuss ethics, they should look in the mirror and see themselves as being extremely unethical in the methods of conning the public out of money to pay the inflated salaries and benefit packages going to HSUS staff and administration.

Odd “Critter” Spotted Along Maine Roadside

RoadsideCritter

RMEF Permanently Protects, Secures Access to Prime Montana Elk Country

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation acquired 988 acres of private elk habitat in south-central Montana which it conveyed to the Helena National Forest. The transaction also improved existing access to thousands of acres of Forest Service lands.

“This is another ‘win’ for sportsmen and women who want improved access to some great Montana elk country,” said Blake Henning, RMEF vice president of Lands and Conservation. “The acquisition breaks up a pattern of private and public land by opening land never before accessible to the public and securing a new entry point into adjacent public land for hunting and other recreational outings.”

Located in the upper Missouri River watershed on the west slope of the Big Belt Mountains, the parcel contains rich, diverse habitat for native wildlife and features large groves of aspen, Douglas fir, grasslands and sagebrush. It is home to large numbers of elk year-round, provides habitat for deer, black bear, mountain lion and other wildlife, and is a migration corridor for grizzlies, lynx and other species.

“This is much more than just vital elk habitat. The property contains a stretch of Ray Creek covering more than two miles,” said Mike Mueller, RMEF land program manager. “The riparian areas are a prime source of cold water habitat for spawning and rearing of westslope cutthroat trout, a native fish currently listed as a Montana Species of Concern.”

The project is a collaborative effort between RMEF, the Helena National Forest and the Neild Family Partnership consisting of four sisters. It received broad support from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, various other state and local government organizations, and numerous conservation and sportsmen groups.

“I am incredibly pleased to share in this moment—a moment that relied heavily on our partnership with RMEF and the support from the Montana Fish & Wildlife Conservation Fund—of celebration with all who have spent countless hours working on this incredibly important project that brought 988 acres of land, within the Canyon Ferry Lake watershed, into public access and ownership,” Forest Supervisor Bill Avey said. “Through this partnership and all the hard work put into the acquisition, these lands will provide excellent elk habitat, aspen groves and pure-strain Westslope cutthroat trout habitat for many generations to come.”

“We are grateful for the Neild family and their recognition of the importance of conserving a vital piece of land that plays such an important role for elk and so many other different species,” added Henning.

The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Trust, RMEF and the Land and Water Conservation Fund provided funding for the project along with other funding partners, all with the same goal of conserving valuable fish and wildlife habitat, open space and productive forest and grasslands.

Michigan: House Passes “Scientific Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act”

A Press Release from the Michigan United Conservation Clubs:

Scientific Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act now law, renders anti-hunting referendums moot

LANSING, MI – The Michigan House of Representatives passed the Scientific Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act today with a bipartisan vote of 65-43. The citizen initiative, which passed the Senate on August 13 and was supported by the signatures of almost 300,000 registered voters, allows the Natural Resources Commission to name game species and issue fisheries orders using sound science, creates a $1 million rapid response fund to prevent Asian carp, and provides free hunting and fishing licenses for active military members.

“We are very thankful to the legislators who voted for sound science, the voters who signed the petition, the organizations who supported it, and the tireless volunteers who collected the signatures of almost 300,000 registered Michigan voters,” said Dan Eichinger, executive director for Michigan United Conservation Clubs. “This is an important step to protecting the rights to hunt, fish and trap in Michigan from radical animal rights organizations.”

The initiative also renders moot two referendums sponsored by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), a Washington, D.C.-based anti-hunting organization, which sought to repeal two bills that would allow a regulated hunting season for wolves in certain areas of the Upper Peninsula where they have killed pets, dogs and livestock. Because the initiative contains an appropriation, it is not subject to a third referendum by HSUS or its front group, Keep Michigan Wolves Protected.

“We thought it was important to listen to the will of the 300,000 registered voters who brought this initiative to us,” said Representative Jon Bumbstead (R-Newago). “This is about more than wolves. It’s about protecting the rights of our constituents to hunt and fish by managing our fish and wildlife with sound science.”

Passage of the citizen initiative settles the wolf hunt controversy, which has moved back and forth over the past two years, providing the certainty that Department of Natural Resources biologists need to move forward with wolf management.

Citizens for Professional Wildlife Management is a coalition of conservation, hunting, fishing and trapping groups and individuals including the Michigan chapters of Safari Club International, the Michigan Bear Hunters Association, Michigan United Conservation Clubs, the Michigan Trappers and Predator Callers Association, the Michigan Hunting Dog Federation, the Upper Peninsula Sportsmen’s Alliance, U.P. Whitetails, Inc., the U.P. Bear Houndsmen, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, National Wild Turkey Federation, Ducks Unlimited and the United States Sportsmen’s Alliance. The act has also received the endorsement of the National Wildlife Federation, the Michigan Salmon and Steelhead Fishermen’s Association, the Lake St. Clair Walleye Association, the Lake St. Clair chapter of Muskies, Inc., and numerous local conservation groups throughout Michigan.

Contact: Drew YoungeDyke, Grassroots & Public Relations | 734-272-2584 | dyoungedyke@mucc.org

Bear Population Needs Management

Given the difficulties the government of Newfoundland currently faces with a class action suit surrounding their management of the moose herd and highway deaths involving moose you would expect a heightened sense of the importance of getting management issues right. While there is little chance of bear and human interactions reaching the levels of those of moose and humans the potential liabilities need to be recognized. Government sets not only forest harvest regulations but regulations around disposal of organic materials. The necessity of foreseeing unintended consequences has become a hallmark of our age.<<<Read More>>>

One Person’s Dispute Over Scientific Fact Does Not a Scientific Fact Make

God, I’m confused this morning. Thank God, we can still submit letters to editors of local and national newspapers. And, thank God, he gave me a brain to understand nonsense and avoid it.

In another letter to the editor of the Bangor Daily News, a writer states that a statement made by representatives of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) that baiting bears for short periods of time over many years in a row, has no measurable impact on bear populations. The writer claims the statement was, “nothing more than an untested hypothesis.” And to prove that this is an “untested hypothesis”, the writer uses an untested hypothesis and states that if a department that most believe operates under the pretext of scientific approach can’t produce a scientific “study” the claim is no good. There! That’s settled.

Let’s not consider a 40-year ongoing bear study by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries as a “scientific study.” What nonsense!

Washington Authorities Target Sheep-Killing Wolves. Wolf Protectors Use Event to Fundraise

According to a Spokesman Review article, authorities in Washington State have decided to order helicopters and shooters to kill four members of the so-called Huckleberry Pack because of persistent depredation by wolves on sheep in the area. This is why forcing large predators into human-settled landscapes is a non-starter.

As is ALWAYS the case, those groups who make a living pretending to care for wild animals, went to work to feverishly do all that they could to raise money. Wolf pimps is what they are, and if it isn’t a wolf, it’s a grizzly bear, a piping plover, a Canada lynx or any other species that can be exploited for profits.

In an email that was sent out by Predator Defense Fund, the effort to stop the destruction of private property by wolves, was called “a secret operation” because Washington officials didn’t take 10 years to consult with the fascists of predator protection first.

The remainder of the email if full of balderdash aimed at playing on the emotions of ignorant people eager to give their money away to fraudulent groups like Predator Defense Fund. Isn’t that why these criminals jump on every opportunity to make money?

Hat tip goes out to Shake, Rattle and Troll

Outdoor Industry Executives Warn North American Wildlife Conservation Model in Peril

USA – -(Ammoland.com)- Arguably, the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation is in peril.

But, there is a solution to not only preserve the model, but push it to new heights of success.

Technology is the answer.

“We must open up access to hunting and fishing for everyone, especially new generations,” says Powderhook visionary and CEO, Eric Dinger.

“I’m not talking just access to lands and waters, but access to information and easy participation. Improving access will save America’s outdoor heritage and industry.”<<<Read More>>>

Maine’s Kennebec Journal Editor Corrects False Accusation About HSUS

In what can only be described as unprecedented, the editor of the Kennebec Journal corrects a statement made by a person in a Letter to the Editor promoting a “yes” vote on Question One of Maine’s upcoming November referendum vote. In that letter, the writer accuses a previous letter writer(Carroll Ware) of “made up stuff out of whole cloth” when Ware said that Wayne Pacelle, CEO of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), wanted to end all hunting.

The editor adds a correction after the Letter to the Editor that reads: “Editor’s note: In 1991, when he was CEO of the Fund for Animals, a radical anti-hunting organization, Pacelle was quoted by The Associated Press as saying, “If we could shut down all sport hunting in a moment, we would.””

The other information contained in this letter about the results of bear baiting is “made up stuff out of whole cloth.”