August 23, 2017

Why Constitutional Amendments to “Protect” Hunting Need The Correct Language

Many states have tried, some have succeeded, in getting a constitutional amendment to protect the right to hunt, fish and trap…or at least they think they have. Truth is, very few, and perhaps no state, has made a success out of actually protecting and guaranteeing the right to hunt, fish and trap. Essentially what they have done is end up with legalese, fit only for the law profession, that says the state recognizes that hunting, fishing and trapping are long held traditions and these activities have been used as part of a game management plan. The new laws then make people think this tradition is being protected, when it is not. And here’s why.

As an example of the wrong wording in a right to hunt, fish and trap constitutional amendment, the state of Maine, over the past few years, has bounced around half-efforts to get an amendment passed. However, I have opposed all wording of this effort because it’s fake wording that fails to provide the protection that I believe most sportsmen want.

Without the proper, tough and direct language, while there may be recognition of how hunting, fishing and trapping have been a part of game management and responsible use of natural resources, all attempts have failed to provide language that forces the state, along with their natural resources departments. or fish and game departments, to manage all game species specifically for surplus harvests. I might point out that this kind of tough language is generally opposed by legislators and in particular heads of fish and game departments. The biggest reason is because most fish and game departments have already morphed beyond sensible and scientific game management in favor of environmentalism’s “Romance Biology” and “Voodoo Science.”

Without this kind of tough and direct language, fish and game departments and/or state governments, can end hunting, fishing and trapping at anytime. With a growth and power of the progressive Left, a totalitarian social effort to end all hunting, fishing and trapping, mostly driven by an extremely perverse animal rights society, not only are fish and wildlife departments gradually, and sometimes not so gradual, are becoming more anti hunting, fishing and trapping, but the general electorate can end hunting, fishing or trapping with one effort at the ballot box with zero consideration for science.

An example of that is seen in British Columbia, Canada, where voters have decided to ban grizzly bear hunting because it doesn’t fit their ideological narrative. As was said by Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Minister Doug Donaldson, “[It is]not a matter of numbers, it’s a matter of society has come to the point in B.C. where they are no longer in favour of the grizzly bear trophy hunt.”

Certainly this reflects the desires of the people, a product of a totalitarian democracy of sorts (two wolves and a sheep discussing what’s for lunch), where a simple vote can destroy long held traditions as well as making a mockery out of wildlife science.

While there never exists any true guarantee of a right to hunt, fish and trap, one does have to wonder if this same kind of referendum would have even been attempted if a true constitutional amendment existed with real power that said it is the mandated function of government to manage all game species for the purpose of surplus harvest and use of natural resources.

It is often argued about whether wildlife is part of the public trust. In my 65 years of life, I do not recall anyone suggesting that viewing wildlife, even out one’s back door, should be stopped or that managers should grow game species to levels that would be harmful to a healthy establishment of animal species. Why is it then, as seems to be the way of the “new” progressive society, that society has little interest in the aspects of the public trust when it comes to the public trust involvement of hunters, fishermen and trappers? In their pea brains, hunters, trappers and fishermen are excluded from any participation in a public trust.

A classic example of totalitarians at work.

Next time anyone begins talking about another proposed constitutional amendment to guarantee the right to hunt, trap and fish, please take a little extra time and honestly ask yourself if what is being proposed will do what it is being sold as doing and is worth any effort to get it passed. Contrary to what the politician will tell you. something is NOT better than nothing.

But, isn’t it now just too late? Does there even exist enough people who aren’t mentally destroyed and manipulated with animal rights and environmentalism, along with Romance Biology and Voodoo Science?

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One Bear, Two Bears, Three Bears, Four

The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife has yet to publish black bear harvest data on their website. So far, this is the second longest it has taken the Department to count bears. How long does it take to count bears? Oh, yeah! It’s the teeth that slows them down. RIGHT!

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When Lawmakers Strengthen Laws Against Hunters and Do Worse Crimes and Get Away With It Themselves

George Smith writes to clarify a new anti-baiting law for deer. Under current circumstances, I do not favor hunting deer over bait, although, like bear management, I think the decision should be based on the need to more effectively control the population of deer, of which Maine does not have a problem with, and that decision should be left in the hands of the commissioner. Why in one instance the commissioner knows best and in another he doesn’t?

According to Smith, a new law,  An Act To Increase the Penalties for Hunting Deer over Bait, was passed in the Maine Legislature that upon a second offense of baiting deer a person’s privilege to purchase a hunting license is revoked for the remainder of that person’s life.

Isn’t this just a bit draconian? In what direction is this Maine Legislature headed? We learned recently of the Legislature passing a bill that directs greater punishment against hunters as a group than any other group or individual in Maine. That is unlawful, and yet it passed and appears as though I am the only one who sees the new law for what it is. Maybe that’s why the Legislature gets away with their fascism.

And now we see the liberal, progressive mindset, that believes tougher laws stop criminals…or is it something else? Perhaps this is part of the brainwashing rearing its ugly head of the brainwashed masses targeting hunting simply because they have been taught to dislike and disapprove of the activity and will do what they can, outwardly and covertly to end the practice.

But that’s just one aspect of totalitarianism run amok. When you consider that at least one of the lawmakers, who is part of the whole Maine Legislative body, committed the crime of threatening the president and displayed his true colors as a bigoted, hate-filled, filthy-mouthed pervert, walks away after offering some kind of fake apology. Why doesn’t he lose his privilege to serve his state and country for life? Who wants a filthy hate-monger representing them anyway? But he keeps his job and can vote on and craft draconian laws like the one we see here.

Evidently, Maine is no different than any other state. Lawmakers, like all politicians, realize at some point in their careers that they are above the law and that the laws they make as fascists, to please the totalitarians for their votes, do not pertain to them. And so, Maine, like so many other places, is headed in the wrong direction.

There once was a day when any law was crafted around the seriousness of the crime. In this case it appears that it is more serious to put out some food for a deer than it is to threaten the life of the president. And in the other case, hunters are to receive greater punishment than any other group or individual.

Somebody’s got their heads inserted deeply where the sun doesn’t shine. And evidently we like it!

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Why Did Maine’s Head Deer Biologist Walk Away From His Job?

*Editor’s Note* – Is there a bad atmosphere at the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife? If so, how will this effect who gets hired as the new guy?

Kyle, who had only been at his position a few years, apparently decided it was no longer for him. Although there has been no official acknowledgment of this from the department, his departure was, insofar as I can tell, abrupt and unexpected. There were no press releases. I stumbled upon the information that he had left his job more than three months after he left his post.<<<Read More>>>

 

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Deadline to apply for the 2017 any-deer permit lottery is August 15.

Press Release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

Deadline reminder to those who wish to apply for 2017 any-deer (antlerless) permit lottery!

Applications will be accepted online until 11:59 p.m. on August 15, 2017.

It is free to apply for the any-deer permit lottery. The drawing will be held on September 8, 2017 and results will be posted on the Department’s website.

Applicants are reminded that the Department does not mail the any-deer, bonus antlerless deer, or superpack antlerless deer permits/transportation tags. Instead, permit winners will need to record their permit number that can be found online after the drawing, and report the permit number to the registration station when tagging their deer.

For more information, visit www.mefishwildlife.com

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Should Maine Licensed Hunters and Fisherman Help Landowners Clean Up After Being Targeted for Undue Process?

So, let’s get this straight. I just received a press release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife seeking volunteers to help clean up trash, etc. on land owned by private individuals “to secure access to private land for recreational use and show your appreciation for Maine’s landowners.” Maybe licensed hunters and fishermen should seriously consider whether helping out the landowner who just screwed them over is in everyone’s best interest.

The Maine Legislature recently passed a bill, which unjustly targets licensed hunters and fishermen for extra punishment if caught harming signs and other private property. If you create the same damage and are not a licensed hunter or fishermen, there is no extra penalty for said crime.

One can understand the frustration of a landowner who is tired of replacing damaged signs or other property, but to specifically target one group is unlawful and until attention is brought to this travesty passed by the Maine Legislature, why should any licensed hunter or fisherman help out a landowner who just saw to it that you would get doubly screwed over for breaking the same law as an unlicensed person?

Sorry, landowners. I have always supported the rights of landowners and will continue to do so. I will not stand ignorantly by while I am unjustly targeted for extra criminal penalties for committing the same crime as an unlicensed person. Until that law is changed, and intelligent landowners step forward to change this law, licensed hunters should send a message.

But, they won’t!

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Mixed Messages About Bears and Nuisance Wildlife And the Words of a Totalitarian

Not that most people actually care or are even positioned in any way to think for themselves anymore, but how can you expect people to “learn to live with wild animals” and other such nonsense when the messages being delivered by the indoctrinated authorities is all over the board?

Let’s look at some of the messages being delivered to the public by the Press from members of the so-called expert and authoritarian crowd, including government agencies.

In an article by an “expert” on bears, the expert addresses the fact that recently a professional runner (whatever that is) in Maine was attacked and chased by two bears. He wields the theory that the reason the bear chased the runner was for the same reason a dog chases a car…unknown. The runner decided, because he was a runner, I suppose, to attempt to outrun the bear. He did and ran into a building and hid behind a screen door. The expert says of this event: “Clearly if the bears wanted to get to him and all they had to do was lean into this flimsy screen door,” he says. “At that point the separation of this screen door was enough to say ‘the chase is over.’ Whatever signaled the chase to shutoff at that point indicating that this wasn’t a predatory attack. The initial event was over when there was a structure involved.”

The expert assumes, in his theory, that the bear is only motivated by the urge to chase something that is moving, a la the dog chasing a car theory. One thing wrong with this theory is that, according to the article, when the runner first encountered the bears, “…he encountered two charging black bears.” The two bears were charging not chasing.

What if the bears were actually looking for a meal? If I were to attempt to rationalized a bear’s behavior, as most people do, failing to accept the fact that an animal is an animal and a man is a man, I could say that the bears decided they weren’t that hungry and less effort would be expended by visiting a nearby garbage can or two. Animal behavior is unpredictable….period!

In this incident the authorities give the following advice: “Wardens advise people who encounter black bears to make themselves appear big, make noise and back away slowly. But they recommend people stand their ground if a black bear charges and say if the bear attacks, then fight back.”

A Maine wildlife biologist, whose job is to deal with encounters and interactions between people and wild animals says that he thinks the best thing to do is to find ways in which people can….wait for it…..here it comes….”learn to live with the bear…” or any other animal that is creating a problem.

I wrote recently about my thoughts on anyone trying to tell me to learn to live with wild animals.

Maine’s wildlife biologist suggests, instead of killing the nuisance animal: “would rather move the bear to somewhere else in the neighborhood and then “haze” it a bit, with noise, hit it with some rubber bullets, fire off some pyrotechnics and maybe even “some hound dogs barking nearby.” (Note: Authorities can legally harass and deliberately abuse a wild animal, hoping it teaches them to fear people. It is against the law for you and I to harass wildlife in this manner.)

According to the expert, relocating a wild animal, “About 50 to even 75 percent of them might die” anyways.

In Maine Government News we get a different story. Here we learn that the State of Maine has brought in the Federal Government agency APHIS (Animal Plant Health Inspection Service) who will distribute rabies bait vaccines in efforts to counter the prevalence of rabies in the Pine Tree State.

In the Release an attempt is being made to educate the public about how to deal with wildlife and especially wildlife that may be infected with rabies. The Government advises against relocating animals, even though they tell us in other media outlets that they prefer moving problem animals to other locations.

“Do not relocate wildlife because this can spread rabies into new areas.”

The last thing I need is some heavily indoctrinated totalitarian animal lover telling me to learn to live with predators and nuisance animals. If I, my family, or my property is being damaged or is in danger of harm or damage, killing the problem animal is about the only sensible solution to the problem. More than likely the reason any animal is intruding on you or your property is because there are too many of them.

Time to do a little house cleaning.

You do what you want to do to deal with such animal issues but don’t tell me I have to learn to live with it when I don’t.

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VooDoo Science, Social Demands and Lyme Disease Drive Any-Deer Permit Allocations

So, let me get this straight! According to John Holyoke’s report in the Bangor Daily News, the excuses the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) give for increasing the allotment of “Any-Deer Permits” (ADP) to over 66,000 is because of 10 consecutive years of mild winters. I can say they were mild for me because I was in Florida, but record breaking snowfall evidently doesn’t account for any part of the Winter Severity Index.

We hear also that most of those ADPs are being handed out in Wildlife Management Districts (WMD) in Central and Southern Maine where populations of deer are the highest, and yet ADPs are being issued in zones where there haven’t been any for a few years and where record deep snowfalls occurred.

And if that isn’t enough to start your blood boiling just a tad, read what Lee Kantar, acting deer biologist(?) said (because the former deer biologist quit and moved on): “Kantar said that as the DIF&W continues to work on its next generation of long-range management plans, a subtle shift is emerging. In past years, it was common for biologists to issue population estimates for various big game animals. When asked for a statewide estimate on deer, Kantar said biologists are focusing more on the health of the population than sheer numbers.

“We’re not abandoning the thought of ‘How many critters are there out there?’ but the means for us doing that, we do as part of monitoring health, as well,” Kantar said.”

This “subtle shift” is a convenient new tool that is part of a continued reduction in accountability for wildlife managers. The ONLY way a biologist can honestly determine how many ADPs to issue to meet population goals is to know how many deer are within a WMD. To somehow approach things from the perspective of “I think the herd is healthy in WMD 27, therefore I will increase ADPs,” is a step backwards of about 40 years.

Now, it appears, the convenient excuse will be that managers don’t really have a handle on deer populations and will, with the onset of a new Romance Biological deer management plan, sense the condition of the herd and make excuses from there. In case you hadn’t figured it out yet, this is right in line with the convenience of Climate Change (CC = 33). With Climate Change and managing deer for “health” is there really any reason Maine needs any wildlife biologists?

The third excuse of convenience is now emerging where the issuance of 66,000-plus ADPs is Lyme Disease. Deer are carriers of ticks that spread Lyme disease. With the perpetual effort to scare the living hell out of people over Lyme disease, social pressures will demand that MDIFW kill more deer. Historically when those demands are made, the deer get killed and licensed sportsmen are not allowed to do the job and residents are not allowed to benefit from the resource. Also, understand that where Lyme disease is said to be most prevalent is in areas where land is heavily posted to prevent access for hunting those deer. As with any Totalitarian society, the problem is created by the totalitarians who in turn demand that government solve their problems. And we know what kind of job government does at anything they do.

Maine residents and sportsmen should look of a “subtle shift,” or maybe not so subtle shift, toward a new movement of Romance Biology and Voodoo Science to guide the wildlife managers to wallow in their own brilliance of disease creation and scarcity because they are fully engaged in the effort to “change the way we look at and discuss wildlife management.”

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Legendary Guide Award: DIFW Never Issued a Press Release or Photo

What is not so wonderful is the seeming impression that the powers that be at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife have allowed this important award to take a back seat to other priorities.

This April, during the MPGA’s spring banquet in Brewer, the IF&W Commissioner Chandler Woodcock was on-hand to present this year’s Legendary Guide Award to another deserving veteran, Don Helstrom, from Turnpike Ridge Outfitters in Millinocket. Trouble is, the news of Helstrom’s recognition apparently never got beyond the doors of the guide’s banquet. MDIF&W never issued a press release or a photo, which has always been the custom.<<<Read More>>>

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Maine Lynx Trapping Case Ends with Anti-Hunters Conceding Defeat

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit officially dismissed an appeal brought by animal-rights organizations concerning the trapping of Canada lynx in Maine, likely ending a multi-year, multi-lawsuit court battle concerning the protections offered the predator in the state.<<<Read More>>>

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