August 17, 2018

Oops! Computer Crashes on Maine’s Any-Deer Permit Application

Deadline extended until Monday.

MDIFW spokesman says they will email everyone who applied for a permit last year to let them know they have until Monday to apply.

With Maine’s deer population running at low numbers and MDIFW allotting a record number of “Any-Deer Permits” it would appear something has to give. Is it that Maine is looking for a one year boost in deer harvest to make things look better than they really are? And what will the deer harvest for 2019 look like?

Even with the increased number of permits going to Wildlife Management Districts where officials say deer numbers need to be reduced, it still makes little sense to me that a record number of permits are needed to balance the overall population.

Couple these thoughts with the new approach MDIFW has decided to take toward deer management where health is the number one issue and counting and tracking populations is not, it’s tough to justify a move to issue unprecedented numbers of anterless deer permits.

I don’t like…but in two years time, we will have a better idea.

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Odd Way of Selling Bear Hunting

It seems that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) is on a bit of a promotion kick attempting to convince more Mainer’s to take up bear hunting.

Maine has too many bears – or at least anyone with any sense at all realizes that – and not enough hunters to control the growth. Or, it could be that the MDIFW is too tightly controlled by the guides and outfitters who dictate to them when, where, how often, how long and what bag limits will be on black bear. Then again, maybe two seasons for bear would work but you still need hunters.

Several articles have appeared in newspapers of late encouraging people to take up bear hunting with the MDIFW expressing thoughts of how the population of bears keeps growing while the population of bear hunters keeps shrinking.

Perhaps an actual change in attitude and presentation of propaganda at the department might help in that way. MDIFW is pretty quick to relate stories of their great bear management activities, cuddling up with bear cubs during the winter surveys and sharing stories of “named” bears as though they were a member of the neighborhood instead of potential table fare.

Some people (potential bear hunters) would prefer to see statistics from bear harvests to determine whether making the effort to take up bear hunting or come to Maine for a visit and do some bear hunting is worthwhile. To a bear hunter, cute and cuddly bear cubs all snuggly-wuggly into the jacket of a bear biologist isn’t what excites a bear hunter.

So here’s a suggestion. To help generate a bit more interest in bear hunting, MDIFW could at least pretend they give two rat’s patooties about bear hunting and see if they could publish the bear harvest results for the previous bear hunting season before the next one begins. Maybe they could even run a few more bear hunting reports in those same newspapers they like to publish cute bear pictures in.

But now that MDIFW has announced that they are no longer all that concerned about game populations and will focus more on health, counting and producing data is a thing of the past. It’s also a convenient way of ensuring there is no accountability.

Well, here’s a thought. If MDIFW is pretending to be recruiting bear hunters (more precisely they are recruiting revenue to pay the retirement pensions) but at the same time changing their focus to the health of game herds instead of population numbers, then history tells us that soon MDIFW will have their hands full of taking up the chore of dealing with all the diseases that come from overpopulations of any animal.

Health focus they want? Health focus they will get!

BUT DON’T GO LOOK!

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Maine’s Contortionist, Human-Reasoning Black Bears

Why? For years I just keep asking myself why it is that bear biologists, as a whole,  insist on protecting the image of a large predator that is capable of ripping you and me to shreds. It just never ends. It’s a giant echo chamber where all you hear is that bears are more scared of you and they rarely bother people. Today, here’s a new false adage to file into your list of inane conversation pieces.

“We have bears that will basically do anything they can, turn themselves inside out, to get away from a human.”

A hungry, angry or threatened bear will also run you down and rip you to shreds under the right conditions. Are we then supposed to approach every bear as though that bear will “turn themselves inside out” to run the other way not satisfying his hunger pains, or having a “time out” to cool his jets for a bit?

Making a statement that bears rarely attack people is not only a bit dishonest but is highly value rated by the individual making the statement or is politically charged by animal protection nuts who rationalize bear behavior to that of humans. It’s much the same as stating that plane crashes are rare. However, when they do happen the event itself (I’m guessing) is highly unpleasant – much the same as being mauled to pieces by a pissed off bear.

The truth is we never know the mindset of a bear when we see one. Yes, it’s “rare” that that bear will turn and eat you up, but, as with any animal, they are unpredictable. Driven by hunger, there is no telling what a bear or any large predator will do. An angry or threatened bear is much the same and we have little knowledge of what can piss off a bear.

A bear does not reason, contrary to what misguided animal perverts might choose to believe. They only act and react on instinct. When you enter bear country, it’s a pretty good idea to have a plan of what it is you are supposed to do when you encounter a bear that’s NOT “turning themselves inside out” to get away. Don’t assume anything.

To a bear, human flesh tastes “just like chicken.”

 

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Vermont Wants Fewer Moose, Environmentalists Want to End Hunting

Vermont, which has been a part of an ongoing moose study in three states – Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont – is now saying they also believe that the reason for an increase in winter ticks that are killing off their moose herd is because of too many moose. Maine was bold enough to make that claim a few months ago.

As with Maine, it appears not everyone in Vermont agrees with the assessment that the state needs to reduce is moose population in order to mitigate the deadly winter tick problem that continues to kill the herd.

At a public hearing earlier this year, attendees thought the logic behind reducing the moose herd absurd and instead called for an end to moose hunting “until the tick problem is better understood.”

The tick problem will never be better understood because there is no end to the terrible misinformation about what causes ticks to increase. So long as brainless automatons narrowly focus their attention on global warming as the culprit, nothing will change. This is insanity.

Even the editors of the linked-to article practice their echo-chambered response that “Mild winters have created a safe haven for ticks to thrive year-round.”

They know nothing about winter ticks and are too lazy to do any real investigating – much like the biologists who manage our game species. There’s little hope for a bright future so long as the ignorant continue to be led to the slaughter with false and ridiculous claims about “Climate Change.”

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Maine County Employees Running Into Too Many Deer, Moose, Bear

While running into these large animals can cause property damage and serious bodily injury, how many incidents are too many? In an article found online, it is stated that “In Aroostook County, encountering animals such as a moose and deer on the roadway is a fact of life.”

If it’s a fact of life, then isn’t it also a no-brainer that if there are too many accidents involving these large animals, it would appear the drivers need some behavior modification. But then again, as is stated in the article “We had 13 [insurance] claims [filed] for Aroostook County over the past three years, and more than half of them were because the employee hit an animal on the roadway.”

So then are we to assume that in three years time there were 7 accidents or 2.3 per year? How does that compare with miles driven etc.? Too many accidents? What’s that mean?

It all kind of reminds me of the somewhat aged country music song, “Too Much Fun.”

Too much fun, what’s that mean?
It’s like too much money, there’s no such thing
It’s like a girl too pretty with too much class
Being too lucky, a car too fast
No matter what they say, I’ve done
But I ain’t never had too much fun

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Sportsmen group developing Augusta land for kids, families

AUGUSTA — The state’s largest sportsmen group is currently developing a 40-acre parcel land in Augusta on which kids and their families will be able to learn about hunting, trapping, fishing, wildlife and the outdoors.

The land, which is just north of Route 3, was donated to the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine last year. For the last few months, the group has been clearing brush, selectively removing trees, constructing an access road and digging a one-acre pond that will eventually be stocked with trout.

That’s the first phase of the project. Over the coming years, the group intends to build trails, camp sites and an archery range with 3-D models of animals, all in consultation with wildlife biologists who can help improve the habitat.

“We don’t want it to look like a national park,” said David Trahan, executive director of the Sportsman’s Alliance. “We don’t want to drive the wildlife off.”<<<Read More>>>

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Maine Fish And Wildlife Department Opposes CMP Transmission Line

George Smith provides a very good report on the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife’s opposition to the proposed electric transmission line from Quebec, eventually to Massachusetts.

Read Smith’s report here.

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Applications for 2018 any-deer (antlerless) permit lottery are now available online from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

Press Release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

 To apply online, visit www.mefishwildlife.com. Online applications are due by 11:59 P.M. on August 15, 2018.

It is free to apply for the any-deer permit lottery. The drawing will be held on September 7, 2018 and results will be posted on the Department’s website.

For this coming deer season, a total 84,745 any-deer permits are proposed for 22 of the state’s 29 wildlife management districts across the state, an increase of 28%. Last year, there were 66,050 permits available to hunters.  Hunters who do not receive an Any Deer permit are only allowed to shoot an antlered deer (with some exceptions during archery season and on youth day).

This year, make sure you also apply for a bonus permit, as there are likely to be wildlife management districts where there are more any deer permits available than there are hunters who apply for them. In these districts, hunters can get a bonus antlerless permit for no charge if they apply and are selected. Last year, bonus permits were awarded in WMDS 20, 21, 22, 24, and 29 which are located in southern, central and coastal Maine.

Hunter success rates are much higher for those with an any deer permit. Generally, success rates for deer hunters in Maine hover around 15% but those with an any deer permit harvested a deer over 20% of the time.

Permit numbers are increasing in nine southern and central wildlife management districts, are decreasing in 11 WMDs and staying the same in nine WMDS. You can find the complete numbers at https://www.maine.gov/ifw/hunting-trapping/any-deer-permit.html#permitallocations. The permit numbers reflect that the 2017-18 winter was more moderate in central and southern Maine, while up north the winter was a little more severe than years past.

The department uses the any-deer permit system to manage the white-tailed deer population in the state. The ability to enact change in the state’s deer populations derives from the ability to increase, or decrease, the number of breeding female deer on the landscape. By controlling the harvest of female deer in the 29 regional wildlife management districts throughout the state, biologists can manage population trends.

Deer hunters in Maine harvested 27,233 deer in 2017, the highest total in the last ten years and an increase of 15% from 2016. Maine’s deer hunt is broken down into several seasons for firearm hunters, muzzleloaders and bow hunters. Most deer are harvested during the general firearms season (23,288), which started on October 28th and continued until November 25. Bowhunters took 2,099 deer, and hunters took 970 deer during the muzzleloading season. Maine’s junior hunters were also very successful on youth day, with 876 youth hunters taking a deer this year.

Deer hunting in Maine provides many Maine families with wild game meat that is high in nutrition, sustainable, free range, and organic. On average, a 150-pound field dressed deer will provide close to 70 pounds of meat.

Deer hunting season (firearms) begins with Youth Deer Hunting Day on Saturday, October 20, 2018. Youth may take a buck statewide or an antlerless deer only in the wildlife management districts where any-deer permits will be issued this fall.

This year, Maine Residents Only Day is on Saturday, October 27, 2017 and regular firearms season for deer runs October 29 through November 24, 2017. Once again this year, a nonresident who owns 25 or more acres of land in Maine and leaves land open to hunting, holds a valid hunting license, and is not otherwise prohibited by law, may hunt deer on the Resident only day.

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I Still Don’t Understand How You Can “Manage” Wildlife Without Counting

And evidently, I’m not the only one scratching their head just a bit in trying to figure this nonsense out. It sure appears on the surface as though claiming counting is no longer important as a vital tool to responsibly manage game populations, like bear, deer, moose, and turkeys is another convenient excuse to hide problems or simply provide alibis for where you were when the moose population dropped dead.

V. Paul Reynolds, in his article today, states the following: “When the moose aerial studies were commenced in 2010, getting a handle on the ever-elusive question of how many moose there actually are was an avowed purpose of the surveys, along with understanding moose mortality and productivity. Eight years later, it seems that, although we have gained useful data on moose sex ratios and causes of mortality, and other indices, we have fallen short in counting heads.”

And in and around 2010 (It wasn’t immediately made known to the public that the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) had undertaken a moose study.), I questioned whether MDIFW would ever get to the real, honest, explanation of life as a moose in Maine or would it be just another in a long line of “studies” backed and crafted by Environmentalism’s Scientismic hocus-pocus. So far, it appears it’s leaning toward the scientismic end result.

However, it was encouraging when MDIFW reported that their data “suggested” that ticks were the real culprit in taking control over moose populations, although there still exists fuzzy voodoo science and romance biology over whether it’s Global Warming or too many ticks that are causing moose mortality.

As Reynolds points out, one of the great selling points of this current moose study was the need to get a solid grasp on the moose population and what is controlling it. The Second Grade question remains how do you accomplish this task while at the same time removing from the new Game Management Plan the importance of population densities and replacing it with “healthy populations?”

At the drop of a hat, or perhaps if it fits the current moose management narrative for political purposes, moose biologists and MDIFW officials seemed almost boastful in stating Maine had 76,000 (or lot’s more) moose. After eight years of study and many dollars later, MDIFW is reluctant to utter a guess?

Perhaps what’s really going on is a matter of attempting to save face. Is it that MDIFW has discovered that Global Warming can’t be blamed for a decline in moose? Has MDIFW discovered that winter ticks really are killing off the moose (you know, some of that “natural balance”) and it is NOT Global Warming that has caused the epidemic? Has MDIFW discovered that trying to grow too many moose has caused the prevailing tick problem? Has MDIFW discovered that there isn’t even close to 76,000 moose and, as yet, has not come up with a workable lie as to why they were so far off in their estimations?

If so, perhaps now they don’t know what to do because taking action to scientifically correct the “unhealthy” moose population means bucking the Environmentalists and Animal Rights groups who not only want more moose they want uncontrolled numbers of every wild animal that exists…despite the consequences.

Being politically on the wrong side of Environmentalism is a place MDIFW does not want to be.

For now, better to act stupid and not reveal your hand, and then maybe it will just magically go away.

In the meantime, let’s practice…1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10… I knew you could.

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A Quintessential Fourth

These days it is difficult to get me to leave the “protection” of my Maine camp compound. But yesterday I ventured, albeit reluctantly, beyond the pines and comparative coolness of the recent, bonafide heatwave, to attend a family (wife’s side) classic Fourth of July gathering, cookout, and water events on the lake. The entire day, with the exception of once realizing I didn’t have any idea where I was supposed to go to find the lake “camp,” reminded me of events as a child, even those very rare occasions of being at a clean fresh-water lake, baking in mostly uncommonly hot (into the 90s) Maine weather, eating hot dogs, cheeseburgers, chicken and ribs cooked on the grill, sipping lemonade, and watching boats of all sizes on the water and the young children completely ecstatic frolicking in the water, splashing, screaming, laughing with hardly a care.

Perhaps the one thing that really drove home to me how perfectly classic this day at the lake with family transpired, was the fact that my ears, not even once, heard the sound of political badgering and/or commentary from any of the estimated 4o or so family and friends gathered. It was exquisite to be void of the nasty, rotten, hate-filled, biased, brainwashed ragging of anyone wishing to express their political verbal sewerage. Instead, the talk was of historic family stories, hunting, fishing, the children, the weather… all of those things once taught and learned like “never talk about sex, religion, and politics.”

For a brief moment in this modern, progressive society, I entertained thoughts that maybe there was hope for a return to how things used to be.

Realty does come crashing down sometimes.

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