October 21, 2014

Fascist Government, Wild Mongrel Dogs, Lies, And Using Humans as Guinea Pigs

“Officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will decide this fall whether a 27-year program aimed at returning the red wolf to the wild in the isolated swampland of eastern North Carolina will go forward.”

“Now they have letters from more than 500 landowners asking them to remove wolves from their property. It is what they promised they would do when all this began. We intend to hold them to it, even if they don’t want to do it.”

“Wildlife officials assured landowners the wolves would not be likely to stray onto their land. If they did, a call to the recovery center would bring a trained officer, who would trap the animal and take it back to the reserve.”

“If the animal was troublesome, a remote-control “capture collar” equipped with a tranquilizer would be detonated, knocking the canine out.”

“In addition, large parts of the protected land were flooded for waterfowl habitation. That forced the wolves to seek different hunting land.”

“Wildlife officials contend that the wolf population has a minimal impact on private land and that they rely on the cooperation of private landowners for the repopulation effort to succeed.”

“We would not leave them behind,” Miranda said. “Whatever the case, we still have our captive population to populate a new area.”<<<Read More>>>

MDIFW Commissioner Opposes Question One

“You are not going to hunt them like deer. If you think you are going to walk in the woods and follow them you are wrong,” Woodcock said, as additional measures mentioned in the referendum question are needed to have a chance at getting a bear. “Hunting over bait is probably one of the best and most ethical ways to hunt. You have a choice of what you want to do.”<<<Read More>>>

Washington County Board Of Commissioners Officially Opposes Question 1

Source: Save Maine’s Bear Hunt

Posted on October 13, 2014

Proclamation

Opposition to Maine Referendum Question #1

“Do you want to ban the use of bait, dogs or traps in bear hunting except to protect property, public safety, or for research?

WHEREAS, Maine has one of the highest black bear populations at over 30,000, without effective hunting methods, the population will continue to dramatically increase; and,

WHEREAS, hunters spend an average of 15 days harvesting their quarry, and only one in four hunters are successful in their endeavors; and,

WHEREAS, monies spend during the hunting season directly and indirectly impact both the local and statewide economies, providing jobs and business opportunities for many rural residents; and,

WHEREAS, the Washington County Board of Commissioners agree that Referendum Question #1 would cripple Maine’s ability to manage its bear population as evidenced by statistical data showing that the use of bait, hounds, and traps are the most effective hunting methods that best control the population. The Board of Commissioners believes that the passage of Referendum Question #1 would compromise the safety of citizens with a potential increase of human-bear interactions; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners strongly support the Maine Wildlife Conservation Council, Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife biologists, and Maine Game Wardens IN THEIR EFFORTS TO DEFEAT QUESTION #1; and,

WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners views Referendum Question #1 as just the beginning of a more expansive effort to erode Maine’s rich hunting traditions;

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Washington County Board of Commissioners, at its October 8, 2014 Regular Meeting, officially opposes Maine Referendum Question #1 that will ban the use of bait, dogs, or traps in bear hunting.

Christopher Gardner, Chairman
John Crowley, Sr. Commissioner
Vinton Cassidy, Commissioner

Don’t let personal choices about bear hunting get in the way of sound judgment

“Here in Maine, wildlife management through science and broad-based public participation is not just a goal; it’s part of the social contract. However, approval of Ballot Question 1 — which would outlaw traditional methods of bear hunting and take away the best tools we have for bear management — would be a wholesale breach of our social contract.”<<<Read More>>>

Maine Bear Referendum Show – Bear Whisperer

Maine Bear Referendum Show – Bear Whisperer from Blaine Anthony on Vimeo.

Coyote Attack on Two Dogs

Maine IFW Talks With Other States That Have Banned Bear Baiting

Press Release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

October 9, 2014

AUGUSTA, Maine – With Maine’s bear management program the subject of a statewide referendum, Mainers are hearing a lot about Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Massachusetts, four states that have passed similar measures.

After similar referendums passed in these states, generally these states have has seen an increase in the bear population, an increase in the number of nuisance complaints, an increase in the number of nuisance bears killed and an increased cost to the public as a result of expanding bear populations. Voters in Massachusetts, Colorado, Washington and Oregon banned bear hunting with bait and hounds from 1992 to 1996.

In Massachusetts, the bear population has increased seven-fold and bear conflicts have increased by 500 percent. Wayne MacCallum, director of the state’s Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, described the situation in an August 24 article in the Portland Press Herald: “(The bear population) is expanding eastward,” he said. “Every year now there are an increasing number of juvenile bears in metropolitan Boston. I suspect if we can’t harvest significantly more, the population will continue to increase.”

He went on to state that “there are constant complaints about bear encounters. We are constantly moving bears. It’s kind of like shoveling sand against the tide. This is the largest bear population in the state for at least 200 years. The fact of the matter is, at some point you will just have so many bears that people won’t tolerate them.”

In Colorado, more than 350 bears are killed each year in response to conflicts. Many towns have passed ordinances that regulate how residents can store their garbage and when it can be placed for curbside pickup, with fines ranging up to $1,000. One Colorado county even banned levered door handles on new houses because home entries by bears are so common.

In some Colorado towns, bear complaints are the number-one call received by police departments. When asked what impact a similar ban would have on Maine’s bear management program, Colorado bear biologist Jerry Apker recently said, “I think it would tremendously complicate how the State has to approach managing bears in Maine.”

In Oregon and Washington, biologists have struggled to prevent property damage by bears since the referendum passed, and those states now allow private landowners and deputized agents to kill bears using bait, hounds and traps in unlimited numbers.

Despite this, bears cause an estimated $16 million in damage to the timber industry each year by stripping the bark from young trees. Donny Martorello, the Carnivore Section Manager with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, recently told 92.9 Radio Host Bob Duchesne that before the referendum, “we were able to use recreational hunters at a very low cost and through time (that) was working well.” While he respects the rights of voters to pass a citizen initiative, he went on to say that “having that full toolbox of ways to manage the resource is something we’d like to see.”

In Maine, bait, hounds, and traps account for 93 percent of our annual bear harvest. Maine is the most forested state in the country, and our woods have a thick understory, which makes still-hunting extremely difficult. The loss of bait, hounds and traps for bear hunting will have a much larger impact on Maine’s bear management program than it has in other states.

In addition, Maine has very few options to increase participation by bear hunters if the referendum passes. The state already has a 14-week hunting season that starts in late August and ends after bears have entered their dens. Bear hunting licenses are already available in unlimited numbers, and a spring hunting season is prohibited by legislation.

During the firearms season on deer, all Maine residents are already allowed to hunt bears without having to purchase a separate bear license. Since Maine won’t be able to offset a reduction in the bear harvest by increasing hunter numbers or season length, if the referendum passes we expect the bear harvest to decline dramatically. This will result in a rapidly increasing bear population that expands into the more populated areas of Maine, causing more conflicts with people.

Even though each of these states is very different from Maine in several ways, it is informative to understand how their bear management programs have evolved over time. Maine’s bear biologists discussed each state’s bear management programs and hunting methods with the biologists in these states. As a result, Maine’s biologists are more convinced than ever that a ban on bear hunting with bait, hounds and traps will be bad for Maine.

In all of these states that passed similar referendums, bait and hounds were responsible for a relatively small portion of the annual bear harvest because the open habitats make other hunting methods, like spot and stalk, more effective. Therefore, it was possible for the fish and wildlife agencies to partially offset the decline in the bear harvest that occurred after the referendums passed.

This was accomplished by lengthening fall hunting seasons, reducing the cost of bear hunting licenses, expanding spring hunting seasons, increasing annual bag limits or issuing more bear hunting permits.

In some states, bear tags were included in a package with other big game licenses, so that virtually all hunters could shoot a bear if they saw it. The rise in bear hunter numbers was due to changes in how hunting licenses were administered, rather than an actual increase in interest in bear hunting (e.g. all big game hunters receive a bear tag and then are counted as bear hunters whether they actually pursue bears or not). Even with these changes, each of the harvests in these states is less than half the number of bears that need to be taken in Maine each year to control the population.

Maine is fortunate to have one of the largest bear populations in the country. We have very few conflicts between people and bears, and those that do occur are generally not severe. Fewer than a dozen bears are killed each year to protect property or public safety. Our bear management program is based on 40 years of research and is highly regarded by biologists across the country.

Leaving bear management in the capable hands of Maine’s biologists and game wardens will ensure that bears retain their stature as one of our state’s most treasured resources.

Angry Washington Ranchers

“This is absolutely a government taking and theft of our private property,” McIrvin said. “My civil rights are definitely being violated. My rights are just as important right here as the whole voting bloc of Seattle and their rights.”<<<Read More>>>

Mexican Wolf Hybrid: No Lessons Learned From History

Because the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fails to take into account any wolf history that dates prior to 1995, nor learn any lessons from the problems with wolves and wolf introduction in the Rocky Mountain States and Great Lakes Region, it is a fraudulent government entity.

I feel bad, in some ways for the Arizona fish and game department in trying to retain some kind of authority to manage all wildlife, but our fraudulent government is working to ensure this will never happen and that is why they refuse to limit the number of hybrid, semi-wild dogs they wish to pollute the landscape with. If the USFWS was an agency actually concerned with the wolf, they would be doing everything in their power to make sure that introducing hybrids into the landscape, which threatens the very existence of the Mexican wolf, never happens.

Two things, however, need to be in practice. First, USFWS personnel need to get out of their air-conditioned, padded office cells, get outside of their unchallenged comfort zones and into the real world and learn something about wolves where people have been dealing with wolves since….forever. But they don’t and they won’t. They didn’t with wolf (re)introduction in the Rockies. They fail to learn and so expecting something different is insanity.

Second, the fraudulent establishment has to actually be looking to protect the Mexican wolf subspecies, if there really is one that is real, and not ruin it with domestic dog genes. In part, to accomplish this, is to stop taking orders from the Environmentalists. Laughing here, because USFWS would be out of a job if these totalitarian socialists didn’t maintain their fraudulent status.

Neither of these two exist. The elites in Washington would never permit the USFWS to reach beyond their puppet strings.

A USFWS spokesperson said they have an obligation:

“We have met with hundreds of stakeholders representing a diversity of perspectives to ensure that our reintroduction of Mexican wolves takes their interests into account,” she said. “We deny the characterization of our meetings with our state partners as backroom deals.”

The notion of managing wildlife, which can ONLY be done with science, with social influences from communist organizations and ignorant people and groups that know nothing about anything scientific or wildlife, contributes heartily to the fraud of the USFWS. But one thing the spokesperson said that is true, but not in the way most people think, that there are no “backroom deals.” A deal implies that there were negotiations. There are no negotiations. History in this field and this fraudulent government agency, shows that they have already decided what is going to happen and there is nothing Arizona, New Mexico or anyone else can do about it.

The deck is stacked, the event is rigged and all “public participation” is a fraud based on a crooked Delphi technique of manipulation for preplanned outcomes.

Someday, maybe, but I doubt it, people will begin to understand this. Until they do….well, who won the football game last night?

Humane Society of the United States Attempts to Muzzle Maine’s Bear Experts, Maine People Overwhelming in Their Support of MEDIFW Participation

Press Release from Save Maine’s Bear Hunt:

Augusta, Maine- The Humane Society of the United States, a well funded, extreme animal rights, Washington D.C. lobbying organization here in Maine under the guise of a front group called Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting, has asked for an emergency injunction to muzzle Maine’s bear experts, including biologists and game wardens at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

The Humane Society of the United States has bankrolled the Yes on 1 campaign since early in 2013, according to public campaign finance reports filed with the Maine Ethics Commission.

“This is a blatant attempt by HSUS to suppress the most knowledgeable experts on Maine’s bear population from communicating with voters about the negative and dangerous impacts of Question 1 based on their scientific research for the past 40 years,” said James Cote of the Maine Wildlife Conservation Council. “The fact is, Maine people believe strongly that the biologists and game wardens at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife should have a voice on this issue. If this were an issue dealing with education, we would demand that the Department of Education weigh in, why is this any different?”

Recent polling, as of Tuesday, October 7th, shows overwhelming support of Maine people for the Department to have a voice on this issue. In a question posed to 500 Maine voters on October 5 and 6, 69% of respondents said that the Department should be allowed to comment, and only 18% of respondents said the Department should not be allowed to comment. 13% were undecided. (Question is attached to this release).

“Mainers for Fair Bear Hunting understandably wants to muzzle the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. They don’t want the public to know that Question 1 removes their ability to control the bear population, and by doing so puts the public at risk. They certainly don’t want voters to know that their entire campaign has been financed by a Washington DC- based lobbying group. They know that once the public knows the facts about Question 1, they will reject it. The Department has an obligation to let the voters know the impact of Question 1: that it is bad for bears, and risky for people,” said James Cote.