September 15, 2019

Biologists ask Alaska residents to count moose

In this article, there’s a lot of “mights,” “coulds,” “perhaps,” and “possiblys” to make one wonder if any of this is worth it or if they even know what they are doing. Anchorage, Alaska is noted for sharing space with moose, particularly in the winter but also during the calving season when moose escape the dangers of the four-footed predators to take their chances with the two-footed ones.

One statement in the article says that in an effort to “count” moose in Anchorage, they have asked the residents, to call, text, or email each time they saw a member of the four-legged species so that state biologists could get an official moose count.Official? I doubt it.

According to the article, 94% of Alaska residents “enjoyed watching moose.” Like most polls it appears this one might be a bit misleading, or used as such for this article. Was the poll inquiring whether they liked watching them in their Anchorage yards on a regular basis? Perhaps, but I don’t think so…at least not in the same numbers.

If officials are hoping to get an “official” count of moose in downtown Anchorage, then what? Are they trying to devise a way to mitigate the problem, or is this even viewed as a problem? I’ll leave it up to my readers to imagine the problems that can erupt if it becomes an encouragement to keep moose as a fixture in the downtown. Hmmm.

This Anchorage, Alaska moose spent many a day in this door yard. She loved to lay under the drier vent to catch the warmth.

 

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Looking Down on Anchor Town

AnchorTown2

Photo by Al Remington

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But, There’s No Snow!

Mid-February, 2015 in Anchorage, Alaska and only a trace of snow.

NoSnowFeb

Photo by Al Remington

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Brown Bear

On display in the lobby of the Comfort Inn, Ship’s Creek, Anchorage, Alaska.

BrownBearComfortInn

Photo by Al Remington

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Anchorage Airport and Mountain Vista

AnchorageAirport

Photo by Al Remington

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Alaska “Box” Grader

Note the “box” or the shorter blade that runs at 90 degrees to the main grader blade. This grader, and others like it, do the snow plowing in Anchorage, Alaska; probably other places too. The “box” blade, operated from the cab, shuts down at each driveway entrance. This prevents massive amounts of snow being dumped in driveway entrances.

BoxGrader

Photo by Al Remington

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Anchortown From High Above

Anchorage, Alaska about 4 p.m. in December.

Anchortown

Photo by Al Remington

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Ground Control to Major Tom

Beautiful mountains in the background!

GroundControl

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Anchorage, Alaska

Anchorageindistance

Photo by Al Remington

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Anchorage, Alaska Winter Midday Sun

middaysun

Photo by Al Remington

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