July 24, 2019

Bill Luke Bass Days 2015

BillLuke

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109 Mexican Wolves – “Cross-Fostering” New Technique to Grow More Wolves

From the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – Southwest Region:

The Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team (IFT) has completed its annual year-end population survey, documenting a minimum of 109 Mexican wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico at the end of 2014. At the end of 2013, 83 wild wolves were counted. This is the fourth consecutive year with at least a 10 percent increase in the known population – a 31 percent increase in 2014.

“In 1982, the Mexican wolf recovery team recommended a population of at least 100 animals in the wild as a hedge against extinction; until we initiated the first releases in 1998, there had been no Mexican wolves in the wild in the United States since the 1970s,” said Southwest Regional Director Benjamin Tuggle. “Although there is still much to be done, reaching this milestone is monumental!”

“This survey demonstrates a major accomplishment in Mexican wolf recovery. In 2010, there were 50 Mexican wolves in the wild; today there are 109, a more than doubling of the population in Arizona and New Mexico. With our Mexican wolf population consisting of wild-born wolves, we expect the growth rates observed this year to continue into the future. In spite of considerable naysaying, our 10(j) program has been a success because of on-the-ground partnerships. We have every reason to believe that our efforts at reintroduction will continue to be successful,” said Arizona Game and Fish Director Larry Voyles.

In spring of 2014, the Interagency Field Team (IFT) successfully implemented a field technique in which genetically valuable pups were transferred to a similarly aged litter of an established pack. During the count operation, the IFT captured one of the two pups that were placed in the established pack during 2014, which confirmed this “cross-fostering” technique as an additional method for the IFT to improve the genetics of the wild population. In addition, the IFT conducted 14 releases and translocations during 2014, some of which provide promise for improving the wild population’s genetic health in the future.

“Testing and implementing new management techniques, such as cross-fostering, can help us improve the genetics of the wild population,” said Tuggle. The experimental population is growing – now our strategy is to focus on establishing a genetically robust population on a working landscape.”

The results of the surveys reflect the end-of-year minimum population for 2014. Results come from population data collected on the ground by the IFT from November through December of 2014, as well as data collected from an aerial survey conducted in January and February 2015. This number is considered a minimum number of Mexican wolves known to exist in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico, as other Mexican wolves may be present but uncounted during surveys.

The aerial survey was conducted by a fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter. Biologists used radiotelemetry and actual sightings of wolves to help determine the count. The results from the aerial survey, coupled with the ground survey conducted by the IFT, confirmed that there are a total of 19 packs, with a minimum of 53 wolves in New Mexico and 56 wolves in Arizona. The current survey documented 14 packs that had at least one pup that survived through the end of the year, with two that had at least five surviving through the end of the year.

The 2014 minimum population count includes 38 wild-born pups that survived through the end of the year. This is also considered a minimum known number since it might not reflect pups surviving but not documented.

The Mexican wolf recovery program is a partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arizona Game and Fish Department, White Mountain Apache Tribe, USDA Forest Service and USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service – Wildlife Services, and several participating counties. For more information on the Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Program, visit http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/ or www.azgfd.gov/wolf.

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Cowboy Bitten by Coyote/Wolf, Saves Dogs With Rock

Press Release from Wolf Crossing dot Org:

While packing salt to a herd of cattle on Wednesday, a ranch manager in eastern Catron County heard a distressed cow bawling and upon investigation the man and his cow dogs were attacked by what he described as a pack of coy/wolves or coyote hybrids.

“I tied my mules up and went to the fight, my dogs were with me. There were 7-8 animals not including my cow dogs and the cow was still trying to protect that baby calf.” Says the cowboy who didn’t wish to be identified due to past harassment by extremists.

“Two of those animals had my hound dog down and were going to kill him. I didn’t bring my pistol, so I hit one with a rock; the other one bit me on the arm and I think I stuck it with my pocket knife and it let go. I finally got my dogs called back enough to get some control of the situation but those animals weren’t leaving and I was afoot without a weapon.”

The cowboy was able to back out of the scene with his dogs and find his pack mule, but his riding mule had taken off for home in the heat of the moment.

USDA Wildlife services and the Catron county law enforcement were notified of the event and an investigation was launched the next day. Clearly the incident was abnormal for what is described as Mexican wolf behavior. Wildlife Service found bite marks on the dead baby calf measuring 39-40 mm; about average size for Mexican wolves but too big to be coyote size which ranges 27-33 mm.

“There was all sizes of the things, small ones, and a couple big ones too. I thought they were coyotes but close up I didn’t have time to examine them really well, especially with the mess we were in.” Upon his return home the ranch hand found his arm was bruised but his heavy cotton duct, coat stopped any puncture wounds and his injuries were not serious.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife service is in the middle of the annual year end count of Mexican wolves but were not able to identify a pack in the area at the time of the attack, although there are documented collared wolf packs that use the area as territory. The cowboy said none had collars at the time of the incident and no radio collar signal was found in the area the day of the investigation.

Ranchers in the area have been pleading with FWS to begin analysis of the wolf packs on the ranches in the area due to an increased belief that they are interbreeding with coyotes resulting in bigger packs of coyote like animals.

Jess Carey, Catron county wolf interaction investigator, wants the animals involved removed and analyzed due to the aggressiveness and defense behavior of the pack.

“I am not sure what I am supposed to do out here, I can’t take care of these cattle like this with these animals running around attacking the cattle, attacking my dogs, and attacking me. This isn’t what they are supposed to be doing with this program.” Said the cowboy involved in the incident which is still under investigation.

Breeding season for both wolves and coyotes is in full swing and single wolves are making wide circles, actively searching for mates in the Blue Range Wolf Recovery area. Physically it isn’t impossible for Mexican wolves to interbreed with coyotes and in this program, wolves have been documented breeding with domestic dogs at least three separate times.

Caren Cowan of New Mexico Cattle Growers association says, “DNA analysis of the pack responsible for this attack is essential if the Mexican wolf program is to be pursued with any scientific credibility.”

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AZ and NM Want Their Wolves Included in Ribble Bill for Delisting

As I understand things, a bill that is planned to go before the U.S. House of Representatives that would effectively remove gray wolves in Wisconsin, Michigan, Wyoming and Minnesota from protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), is being crafted as I write. According to some sources, once that bill is ready it will be presented to the House.

There now appears to be a movement underway in Arizona and New Mexico where groups seeking control of wolves in the Southwest want their Congressional representatives to get in on the action and get Mexican wolves in those states included on this bill.

Below is a copy of a letter sent to Rep. Steve Pearce from the Catron County Commission seeking action.

RE: Addition of “Mexican Gray Wolf” to be included with the “Gray Wolf’s” removal from the Endangered Species List Congressman Pearce,

The Catron County Commission requests that you add the “Mexican Gray Wolf” (Canis Lupus Baileyi) into the legislation U.S. Representative Reed Ribble, R-Wis. is preparing to remove the “Gray Wolf” off the Endangered Species List in four States.

U.S. Representative Ribble is leading the effort and the co-sponsors include U.S. Representatives Collin Peterson, D-Minn., Dan Benishek, R-Mich., and Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyo.

There has already been severe collateral damage to the citizens of Catron County, County Government and the State of New Mexico in recovery of Mexican Gray Wolves on settled landscapes by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (See attachment A1 Dr. Geist)

Now, with the new 10j rule, Mexican Wolf Recovery will be expanded up to I-40 (eventually beyond) in New Mexico-Arizona and South to the Mexican border. This expansion will take in vast settled landscapes and will have major negative effects on the citizens, pets, businesses, livestock, and wildlife.

All the Mexican wolves that have been released into the Gila Wilderness have moved and gone into areas of human activity. The last wolf pack, the Coronado Pack was released last July, 2014 into the Gila Wilderness. The wolves left the Wilderness recently, entered private property attacking and injuring two dogs. The wolves were hazed back into the Gila Wilderness by the USFWS and the chance of them remaining is questionable.

Congressman Pearce, by taking the Mexican Wolf off the Endangered Species List it will save rural families from losing their homes, businesses and private property rights.

Attached are documents to show the negative effects and collateral damage to achieve Mexican Wolf Recovery on settled landscapes .

Respectfully Submitted,
Glyn Griffin,
Catron County Commission Chair

Attachment A1

Dr. Geist addresses the issue of wolf recovery on settled landscapes

Wolves cannot be kept in settled landscapes, because of the impossibility of keeping wolves and dogs apart, and the destruction of the wolf genome by creeping hybridization. While I whole-heatedly agree that there should be no keeping of wolves and wolf hybrids as pets, the sheer size of the “wolf-dog” industry as well as past releases of wolf hybrids will insure further erosion of the genome of free-ranging wolves. Secondly, how is officialdom to know of wolf hybrids unless wolf numbers are strictly and closely regulated so that plenty of specimens are available for testing. Thirdly, from my experience identifying wolves or dogs from photos sent my way I have serious doubts that European wolf specialists can currently distinguish wolf from dog. Unless limits are set early to wolf numbers – and I see no hint of that – wolf populations will expand to destroy the populations of deer and turn to livestock and humans.

Do the authors of this manifesto really think that they can significantly keep wolves and dogs apart by minimizing the number of free-ranging dogs? Even if they have some success in doing so, are they not aware that lone wolves themselves seek out dogs? Do they really think that lone wolf females in heat will desist from visiting suburbs and farms looking for a mate? Do they think that chained farm dogs will not copulate with a female wolf in heat at night? Has nobody had the experience of holding a young very large male dog in training while they come in contact with am estrus female canid? I had a Bouvier de Flandre on the leash while we came across a small wolf track in the snow – and the Bouvier went wild! He then weighed only about a hundred pounds. I had my hands full! An amorous male wolf threatened my wife when he approached an estrus hunting dog in an enclosure. No neighborhood male dog had been that bold! In short, given wolves with a desire to mate and they will intrude deep into human habitation. There is no way to effectively segregate wolves from dogs in settled landscapes. Moreover, as this is written, there is now way to protect wildlife from marauding packs of dogs either.

As I have said before, all efforts to make wolves compatible with settle landscapes are a waste of time and energy. All marauding canids in settle landscape need to be removed. This raises the question of how to conserve wolves as a species. What we know for certain is that they need to be kept away from people and dogs. In the first instance that means that wolves and other large predators need to be kept where the public has no entry. And such areas need to be large. The very first step is to negotiate internationally for keeping large predators on military and atomic reserves. I doubt that national parks are suitable because the tourist lobby will balk. Secondly, means and ways need to be found to control closely wolf populations in such reserves to insure that the predators do not run out of prey, and leave the reserves for settled landscapes. Well-fed wolves will cause the least problems. Severe trapping and predator control in 20th century North America kept wolves out of settled landscapes, eliminated agricultural losses and disease transmission, retained their genetic integrity, while attacks on humans were unheard of.

Wolf conservation as proposed here (i.e. Europe) is not serious.

Sincerely, Val Geist
Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science

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Arizona Intent to Sue USFWS For Failure to Create Wolf Recovery Plan

*Note* Click here for a copy of letter sent to DOI/USFWS

For immediate release, Jan. 6, 2015

Arizona Game and Fish issues notice of intent to sue federal officials over Mexican wolf recovery plan development

PHOENIX – The Arizona Game and Fish Department today served a Notice of Intent with the secretary of the Department of Interior and director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service). The action was taken in an effort to support development of an updated recovery plan for Mexican wolves that utilizes the best available science as legally required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Game and Fish has requested an updated recovery plan from the Service on multiple occasions over the past several years because the current recovery plan for Mexican wolves developed in 1982 is so outdated that it no longer provides an adequate framework to guide the recovery effort. That plan also fails to identify the recovery criteria required by the ESA including downlisting and delisting criteria.

“This Notice of Intent is an effort to ensure that the Fish and Wildlife Service adheres to its legal obligation to develop a thorough science-based plan that will lead to a successful recovery outcome that recognizes Mexico as pivotal to achieving recovery of the Mexican wolf given that 90 percent of its historical range is there,” said Arizona Game and Fish Department Director Larry Voyles.

Bi-national recovery plans for endangered species have been successfully established with Mexico for other species including Sonoran pronghorn, Kemp’s ridley sea turtles and, most recently, thick-billed parrots. The department asserts that to succeed, Mexican wolf recovery must include an integrated, bi-national approach that incorporates the recovery work already underway in Mexico.

“I fully support today’s action and I look forward to working with the department to develop a legal and sound plan for the recovery of the Mexican wolf,” said Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich.

The Service is currently in litigation with several parties that are pushing for reestablishment of Mexican wolves in areas that are not part of the subspecies’ historical range and requesting a resolution in an unreasonable timeframe. These groups are basing their litigation on a draft report developed by a Mexican Wolf Recovery Science and Planning Subgroup. The department completed extensive analysis of the subgroup’s recommendations and found the science used as a basis for the recommendations to be significantly flawed. This misguided approach could jeopardize genetic integrity of the subspecies if the Mexican wolf is permitted to reestablish in close proximity to Northern gray wolves.

Secretary Sally Jewell of the Department of Interior has 60 days to respond to the Notice of Intent. If the secretary fails to respond, the department will pursue civil action. A Notice of Intent is a required precursor to pursuing civil action.

Arizona Game and Fish’s involvement in Mexican wolf conservation began in the mid-1980s. Since that time, the department has spent more than $7 million on wolf recovery in the state and has been the predominant on-the-ground presence working to manage Mexican wolves.

For more information on Mexican wolves, visit www.azgfd.gov/wolf.

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New Mexico Investigator Offers Stern Wolf Warning To Arizona

“Wolves are the main killers of cattle in Catron County, N.M., and are setting a record for the number of confirmed kills in 2014.

Catron County, which borders eastern Arizona and is included in the Gila National Forest, is the site of the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area. It was one of the first areas where Mexican gray wolves were released in an effort to reestablish their population in western states.

According to Catron County Wildlife Investigator Jess Carey, the results have been devastating to local ranchers. In a report titled Mexican Wolf Recovery Collateral Damage Identification in Catron County alone, he noted that of five ranches he studied, two went out of business and a third did not restock cattle after 2009. Over the course of the study, the five ranches lost a total of 651 head of cattle valued at more than $382,000.”<<<Read More>>>

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Mexican Wolf Hybrid: No Lessons Learned From History

Because the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fails to take into account any wolf history that dates prior to 1995, nor learn any lessons from the problems with wolves and wolf introduction in the Rocky Mountain States and Great Lakes Region, it is a fraudulent government entity.

I feel bad, in some ways for the Arizona fish and game department in trying to retain some kind of authority to manage all wildlife, but our fraudulent government is working to ensure this will never happen and that is why they refuse to limit the number of hybrid, semi-wild dogs they wish to pollute the landscape with. If the USFWS was an agency actually concerned with the wolf, they would be doing everything in their power to make sure that introducing hybrids into the landscape, which threatens the very existence of the Mexican wolf, never happens.

Two things, however, need to be in practice. First, USFWS personnel need to get out of their air-conditioned, padded office cells, get outside of their unchallenged comfort zones and into the real world and learn something about wolves where people have been dealing with wolves since….forever. But they don’t and they won’t. They didn’t with wolf (re)introduction in the Rockies. They fail to learn and so expecting something different is insanity.

Second, the fraudulent establishment has to actually be looking to protect the Mexican wolf subspecies, if there really is one that is real, and not ruin it with domestic dog genes. In part, to accomplish this, is to stop taking orders from the Environmentalists. Laughing here, because USFWS would be out of a job if these totalitarian socialists didn’t maintain their fraudulent status.

Neither of these two exist. The elites in Washington would never permit the USFWS to reach beyond their puppet strings.

A USFWS spokesperson said they have an obligation:

“We have met with hundreds of stakeholders representing a diversity of perspectives to ensure that our reintroduction of Mexican wolves takes their interests into account,” she said. “We deny the characterization of our meetings with our state partners as backroom deals.”

The notion of managing wildlife, which can ONLY be done with science, with social influences from communist organizations and ignorant people and groups that know nothing about anything scientific or wildlife, contributes heartily to the fraud of the USFWS. But one thing the spokesperson said that is true, but not in the way most people think, that there are no “backroom deals.” A deal implies that there were negotiations. There are no negotiations. History in this field and this fraudulent government agency, shows that they have already decided what is going to happen and there is nothing Arizona, New Mexico or anyone else can do about it.

The deck is stacked, the event is rigged and all “public participation” is a fraud based on a crooked Delphi technique of manipulation for preplanned outcomes.

Someday, maybe, but I doubt it, people will begin to understand this. Until they do….well, who won the football game last night?

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Mexican Wolf Game Change: To Hiss and Boo or Stand and Cheer?

ArizonaWolfPlanRecently I wrote a book about my life as an Innkeeper/Hotel/Motel/Manager. Included in that book in the last chapter was something that I shared as a means of finding fault with myself in that it took me far too long to understand the mistake I was making in thinking I could remain in the hospitality business that I disliked.

Chapter One
I walk down the street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I fall in.
I am lost …. I am helpless.
It isn’t my fault.
It takes forever to find a way out.

Chapter Two
I walk down the street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I pretend that I don’t see it.
I fall in again.
I can’t believe I am in this same place.
But it isn’t my fault.
It still takes a long time to get out.

Chapter Three
I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I see it is there.
I still fall in … it’s a habit … but, my eyes are open.
I know where I am.
It is my fault.
I get out immediately.

Chapter Four
I walk down the same street.
There is a deep hole in the sidewalk.
I walk around it.

Chapter Five
I walk down another street.

Earlier this summer, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided it was going to change up the rules to their rigged game about trying to establish a population of hybrid wolves in the Southwest Region of the U.S. As is required by law, a Draft Environmental Impact pack of lies Statement was released and now a comment period is allowed, in which anyone wishing may offer comments, scientific studies, proof, facts, or maybe just tell a funny story. It really doesn’t matter because the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has already decided what they are going to do and they are just going through the motions to make themselves look good or that they actually care. History proves this point. (Please see street analogy above.)

You see, within the rigged system, much the same way as our rigged Courts use “Arbitrary and Capricious” to justify decisions made, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service uses “Best Available Science.” Best available science is a farce and works well within the rigged system. That’s why it is there. It can mean anything and in the crafting of the rigged Endangered Species Act, the Secretary is granted his “deference” and therefore can utilize, by hand selecting, the “Best Available Science” that best fits an agenda. History proves this point. (Please see street analogy above.)

I am in the process of writing a book. In that book is a great deal of information that comes from the dissecting of the Final Environmental Impact pack of lies Statement. There is not one single bit of information in that FEIS, now 20 years later, that resulted in truth. Not one thing. Everything in that FEIS was based on the fraud of 30 breeding pairs of wolves and 300 wolves, within 3 wolf recovery areas; a “recovered” wolf population.

Dr. Charles Kay sought the “scientific evidence” that supported this fraudulent claim and there exists none – therefore the claim of fraud.

In addition, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, of their own will, chose to completely disregard 15 issues of concern pertaining to wolf (re)introduction. To show how rigged and either corrupt or inept the entire episode of wolf (re)introduction was, as I said, not one promise made by the Feds was upheld and nearly all of the 15 items they deemed to be “insignificant” have now proven to be very significant. Can our wildlife managers be that inept? Evidently because the most recent Draft Environmental Impact Statement, corrects very little of it.

In the Southwest, perhaps a standing ovation should be order for the Arizona fish and game and their supporters, who are trying to hammer out changes, specifics and agreements, that will carry consequences, to be included in a final impact statement.

Some of the specifics include a limit of no more than 300-325 total wolves divided between Arizona and New Mexico and a percentage cap on reductions in elk populations due to wolf predation. I think I read as well that proof of those numbers will fall into the hands of the state fish and game departments and not the “Best Available Science” of the Feds.

On the other hand please stand and offer boos and hisses because there is absolutely no reason to believe that the Feds will adhere to their agreement, as they seldom do and we know for a fact that none of it will stand up in a rigged court system, in which environmentalists can use taxpayer money, hand select an activist judge, who advocates for “arbitrary and capricious,” and force Arizona and New Mexico to watch a seriously depleted elk and deer population turn to ruin. Instead of facing a maximum of 300-325 wolves and a 15% impact on wild ungulates, like the Northern Rockies, there will be 3,000 to 6,000 wolves, disease, unsustainable ungulate herds in places, and ranchers run out of business and it will be business as usual.

I see that there are two issues that might make a difference. Arizona’s plan calls for the state’s withdrawal from the wolf program with all their assets if the Feds violate the agreement. The second is perhaps a half of a difference maker. If Arizona can get what they want in this impact statement, they will at least have a signed agreement. However, it will not matter because the Courts will change the entire plans. They always have and always will. History proves this point! (Please see street analogy above.)

That is why we are slaves within a rigged system. Maybe it’s time to walk a different street but I am not sure I know what street that is.

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One Arizona County Doesn’t Want Any Wolves

PRESCOTT – The Yavapai County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted Monday against the return of wolves to this county.

“Yavapai County doesn’t need wolves,” Supervisor Chip Davis said. “We’ve got a fix for the imbalance in the ecosystem. It’s called hunting.”<<<Read More>>>

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Impact on Ranchers by Wolves in New Mexico

What you will see in this video is a clear representation of the results of a perversion of ideals and a major screw-up of priorities. It should be viewed as a mental illness in order that some damned animal takes priority over human pursuit of happiness and the ability to protect property and run a business. It goes beyond perversion and enters the realm of criminal that mentally perverse sub-humans would issue death threats against others for protecting what is rightfully theirs.

And now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to change the rules in the middle of the game. Please contact your government representative and tell them to stop dumping these mongrel, nasty, disease-carrying, killing machines into the landscapes of Arizona and New Mexico.

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