September 24, 2017

Two Lynx Share Brief Conversation on Road Near Kokadjo

Read More here, but I think the statements that indicate there aren’t enough Canada lynx around is just typical propaganda.

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Maine Lynx Trapping Case Ends with Anti-Hunters Conceding Defeat

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit officially dismissed an appeal brought by animal-rights organizations concerning the trapping of Canada lynx in Maine, likely ending a multi-year, multi-lawsuit court battle concerning the protections offered the predator in the state.<<<Read More>>>

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Sportsmen’s Alliance, Maine Trappers Victorious in Lynx Lawsuit

Press Release from the Sportsmen’s Alliance:

On Wednesday, Feb. 15, U.S. District Judge Jon Levy issued his ruling in a lawsuit that sought to revoke the state of Maine’s Incidental Take Permit (ITP), which would open individual trappers to Endangered Species Act (ESA) violations. Judge Levy ruled the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s use and application of ITPs were lawful and in keeping with the requirements of the ESA.

The ruling is a clear victory for the Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation, trappers in Maine and the Maine Department of Inland Fish and Wildlife. In his ruling, Judge Levy found that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s “actions were in keeping with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act…the National Environmental Policy Act…and the Administrative Procedure Act…”

“We are extremely pleased that District Court Judge Levy has sided with reasonable and responsible management,” said Evan Heusinkveld, Sportsmen’s Alliance president and CEO. “Today’s clear ruling is nothing short of a full victory for trappers, but also hunters and anglers, too. This case had far-reaching implications for how Endangered Species Act policies would be implemented. If anti-hunting organizations can ban all trapping in the areas where protected lynx are found, what[sic] would stop them from banning fishing in streams or rivers that contain[sic] endangered fish species?”

The case, filed by the anti-hunting and anti-trapping groups Center for Biological Diversity, the Wildlife Alliance of Maine, the Animal Welfare Institute and Friends of Animals, was essentially a backdoor attempt to use the Endangered Species Act to stop trapping in the state. At the heart of the legal battle were Incidental Take Permits, which are granted under the ESA and provide for limited, incidental taking of federally protected species. Without such protection, individual trappers and state wildlife agencies could be held liable for ESA violations every time a lynx was accidentally caught in a legal trap.

“Today is a great day for Maine trappers, and this judgment vindicates the great work of the Maine Department of Inland Fish and Wildlife,” said James Cote, director of government affairs for the Maine Trappers Association. “We are so pleased with this outcome, which is positive for trappers and Canada[sic] lynx alike, and that wouldn’t have been possible without our partnership with the Sportsmen’s Alliance.”

Canada lynx, which are listed as a threatened species in the U.S. due to fragmented populations at the southernmost range of their habitat, are abundant north of the border in Canada. In fact, there are many who believe that the lynx populations should be removed from the ESA altogether.

This is not the first time that the Sportsmen’s Alliance and Maine trappers have prevailed in trapping litigation. In 2010, we successfully defended against a similar lawsuit that also tried to use the Endangered Species Act to stop trapping. That case paved the way for trapping to continue.

Joining the Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation in the most recent case was the Maine Trappers Association and the National Trappers Association.

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We’re All Gonna Die! Or Maybe Just the Canada Lynx

But never fear the Climate-Changemongers are doing the best they can to earn money and retire with cushy pensions.

I read recently that a former employee of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Mark McCollough, who went to work for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and has since been protected by his government agency, is planning to speak in Bangor on his, and others, strategies to save the Canada lynx from “Climate Change.”

What a scam!

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Are We Making a Big Mistake Protecting All These Animal Species?

I grew up in the woods of Maine. It seemed everyday I was in the woods and at least adjacent to them. I rarely saw the wild animals that everyone is seeing today. Is this a good or bad thing?

I never saw a black bear in the wild until I was an adult. Now I am dodging them with my car. I think I saw a bobcat once. Now, we readily see photos of them in the news. Coyotes were unheard of and those claiming to have seen one was laughed at. Today they have become a nuisance in numbers. I saw a moose once standing in the middle of the road drooling. It was a bull and he didn’t really look so hot. Today, all we hear is of the hundreds, perhaps thousands of moose dying each season from winter ticks. Maybe the increase in moose and ticks are related. Lynx was something we called sausages. Now, they are quite often run over by cars. Deer were quite common and seldom did our freezer go empty – it was a necessary thing to have venison to eat through the winter. We were poor.

It seems that today, the cry is persistent to protect any and every kind of animal. Part of what’s wrong with this demand is that it is spurred on by people insisting they want to see these animals in their back yards or from the comfort of the automobiles. I think back to the many, many years of putting on countless miles in the woods and the comparatively less abundance of wildlife. Today, the demands are such that it’s time to revisit just what in the hell we are doing and for what purpose are we doing it.

The results of an overabundance of any one or a number of wildlife species are never any good…at least for the animals. Biology 101 taught us about the diseases that happen when too many of any one animal is crowded into limited space. Space is relative and as ignorant humans, who love to put human traits on every animal, and that live in comparatively close quarters, we may not understand the consequences of protecting wild animals for our own selfish desires.

Cross-breeding of species is happening now at what appears an alarming rate. Not that long ago we heard of a polar bear crossing with a grizzly. Why did that happen? We now know that there really is no such thing as a “pure” wolf. So-called wolves and coyotes, we discover, are nothing more than a hybrid of species. And, I think I am just scratching the surface. Each species carries with it recognizable traits. What happens when species cross? We don’t know. What we do know is often behaviors change and that presents a entire host of other possibilities, the most of which are never any good.

Today, I read about how the Canada lynx, a species of wild cat that is protected by the U.S. Federal Government, as well as some Canadian governments, has been cross breeding with bobcats. The article mentioning this event says, “..biologists are finding a surprise: lynx are mating with bobcats in New Brunswick, creating fertile hybrids.

“It’s a pretty good cross between them,” Libby said. “They look like a bobcat, but they have really long black tufts on the ends of their ears and a little bit larger feet.”

What does this really mean? How will this event change the characteristics of the offspring and the continual breeding and cross breeding of cross breeds, etc.? We don’t know. Each species comes equipped with certain physical traits to aid in their survival. Will cross breeding alter those traits in ways that become detrimental to the species we are trying to protect? Is this a common occurrence that we are just now discovering, or is this rare and due to other circumstances, like over protecting a species or two, forcing overlaps that result in cross breeding?

One of the problems this country is facing is the perpetuated nonsense that somehow man must be removed from the fields and forests in order that the wild species can do whatever it is they are going to do with no help from man. It was never intended to be this way, nor does that proposal work real well.

It is hoped that this perverse pendulum will get to wherever it is headed and swing back to something more closely resembling sanity before we have destroyed our wildlife thinking we are saving it.

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Last Time I Checked Canada Lynx Also Eat During Summers in Maine

In a recent article I just read about Canada lynx in Maine, the author said:

“The environment in Maine is perfect to support Canada lynx populations. Harsh winters, deep snow, dense evergreen forests and sub-zero temperatures are exactly what the lynx likes.

“…Some believe both lynx and coyotes would compete for the same food, but during a recent 12-year study, it was found that is not the case. Lynx roam the deep snow without problems, while coyotes travel more in packs along trails and road systems, and are more likely to attack larger prey, such as deer.”

I have not read, nor do I know, what 12-year study on lynx the author refers to. However, I grew up in Maine and lived there year round for nearly 50 years. I’ve experienced some of those “harsh” Maine winters, with snow depths reaching in excess of 100 inches. I can also tell you with certainty that those conditions, even in northern Maine, do not persist throughout the year. Snow melts in Spring, Summers are warm and Fall can extend well into December.

The question should become, what do Canada lynx eat during the majority of the year when it doesn’t have the advantage over coyotes to stay on top of the snow? If the deep, soft snow persists in northern Maine for 4 months, does the lynx fast for the remaining 8 months? Perhaps the coyote and lynx have some kind of mutual convention in which they discuss which days of the week they will eat?

The Canada lynx is NOT an endangered or threatened species. Environmentalism has caused the brainwashing of non-thinkers to believe that even an animal that periodically inhabits fringes of its normal habitat, must be protected at all costs, and there is little understanding of the realities that exist. Putting out nonsense that coyotes and lynx don’t compete with each other for food, is dishonest at best. The author’s description of what happens in the depth of winter in Maine is, for the most part, accurate. However, the coyotes and lynx must eat to survive the remainder of the year, which happens to be the majority of the year. Why is not that aspect of lynx survival discussed?

 

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Wish to Be a Lynx Rather Than an Eagle

Actually, animals don’t matter when it comes to politics and profits.

But don’t go look!

Which reminds of the story of Barack “Walking Eagle” Obama, at a press conference, attempting, in his mumbling, stumbling, knuckle-dragging way, to speak about the need to protect the spotted owl. He told of the time he once ate a spotted owl. One reporter asked what it tasted like and he replied, “It was a cross between a bald eagle and a northern loon.”

If Obama’s greenie projects, to repay the cronies that got him elected, wanted to be put windmills up in the middle of the largest population of nesting spotted owls, you can bet it would happen.

We now see how, depending upon which environmental group and who forked over the most money for Obama’s “selection,” there is no rhyme or reason nor consistency in the hows and whys of the issuance of Incidental Take Permits – a Federal license to kill endangered animals.

So that Obama can pay off his political payback bills to his hacks before leaving office, in order for some of his crony wind farm owners to build their 500-plus windmill project, the Government is going to issue them an Incidental Take Permit to kill as many as 2 bald eagles and 14 golden eagles a year. The deaths occur from rotating windmill blades chopping the eagles and many other bird species into chucks fit for a stew. (Rumor has it the “road kill” is used in dog food.)

A previous study showed that such a wind project would result from between 46 and 64 eagle deaths. But, that information was discarded because it didn’t fit the president’s narrative on cronyism.

In comparison, Maine, in recent years, was issued an Incidental Take Permit that would allow trappers to kill one half a Canada lynx a year for ten years. Sound equitable to you? What a deal!

If lynx could fly, one has to wonder if some of the wind projects in Maine would have been granted Incidental Take Permits allowing for the destruction of 46 to 64 lynx over a prescribed period of time.

More information on the Incidental Take Permit for Eagles in Colorado.

Some online comments here.

And information about Obama’s environmental buddies putting up reward money to prosecute whoever killed two Canada lynx in Maine recently.

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Maine: Two Canada Lynx Found Dead

*Editor’s Note* – Perhaps this is as suspicious as when, only weeks after the USFWS granted Maine an Incidental Take Permit for lynx, three dead lynx “mysteriously” turned up in “traps.”

BUT DON’T GO LOOK!

Press Release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

A reward of up to $5,500 is being offered in connection with the recent illegal killings of two Canada Lynx in Maine. The Maine Warden Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service investigators are seeking information regarding two separate Canada Lynx shootings in northern Oxford County and Aroostook County.

The Canada Lynx is listed as a threatened species under the Federal Endangered Species Act. Unlawfully killing a Canada Lynx carries a maximum fine of up to $100,000 and or imprisonment up to one year. Maine’s Operation Game Thief, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Maine Trappers Association are all contributing considerable reward money.

The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife long term monitoring of lynx indicates that lynx are increasing in number and expanding their range in Maine. Vehicle accidents involving Canada Lynx, sightings of lynx, and verified lynx tracks are increasing in number and location. A record number of Canada Lynx, 11, have been killed by vehicles in 2016.

The Maine Warden Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Investigators are seeking information in the following incidents:

Case 1 [T14 R7 – NEAR Portage Lake, Maine] On November 17, 2016, a Canada Lynx was shot and found dead alongside a logging road that connects the Hewes Brook Road and the Wilderness Island Road, west of Portage Lake. This was reported to the Maine Warden Service after a concerned sportsman discovered the shot lynx in a legally-set foothold trap.

Case 2 [Near Aziscohos Lake – western Maine] U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Maine Warden Service are also investigating the recent shooting of a Canada Lynx that is believed to have occurred on or about November 15. This took place on a logging road that connects to the Parmachenee Road on the New Hampshire/Maine border near Aziscohos Lake, approximately seven miles north of the Parmachenee Road/Route 16 intersection.

It is believed that this Canada Lynx was shot and killed with a rifle. This adult male lynx was wearing a GPS radio collar that was affixed by IFW wildlife biologists in 2015 as part of an ongoing IFW lynx study.

Currently, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife biologists are in the midst of a three-year Canada Lynx study that will provide an updated lynx population estimate. Early results support an increasing range and number of lynx in Maine. A 2006 Canada Lynx population survey by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife estimated the population between 750 -1000 adult lynx in their core range of northern Maine.

Maine Operation Game Thief is offering a $2,500 reward for each case ($5,000 total) to anyone with information that leads to a conviction for the person(s) responsible for killing either of these Canada Lynx. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is offering an additional reward of up to $2,500 for each case ($5,000 total) to any person who furnishes information which leads to a conviction in either case. Additionally, the Maine Trappers Association will add a $500 reward for each case to any person ($1,000 total) who can provide information that leads to a conviction in either Canada Lynx case. Total reward dollars for these cases has now reached $11,000.

Anyone with information about either incident is urged to call Maine Operation Game Thief at 1-800-ALERT-US (207-287-6057), you can remain anonymous. People may also call Public Safety Dispatch in Bangor at 1-800-432-7381 (207-973-3700).

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Hacking Down Maine’s Forests for Canada Lynx

When Maine applied to the fascist United States Federal Government to obtain a permit that would allow for the accidental “taking” of Canada lynx, called an Incidental Take Permit, part of the agreement was that Maine would “provide habitat” in a 22,000 acre management area.

Yesterday, Maine outdoor writer George Smith reported on the upcoming lawsuit hearing by environmentalists to further stop trapping in Maine. In his report he stated, “In addition to the steps taken to limit the possibility of lynx getting caught in traps, the state created(sic) 6,200 acres of prime lynx habitat on state lands north of Moosehead Lake. Ironically, to create that habitat, the state had to significantly increase the harvest of trees there.”

These are the same blooming idiots who would be the first to file a lawsuit against Maine if the state, or any other private land owner, opted to clear-cut 6,200 acres of forest. Why doesn’t anybody see the insanity here?

Insanity does rule…..but,

DON’T GO LOOK!

obamalynx

The now-threatened and soon to be extinct “Obamalynx.”

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Lynx in South Vermont – Driven There by Global Warming?

*Editor’s Note* – If readers have even a basic understanding about Canada lynx, including its history, the tone of the information found in the below article, is typical environmentalism’s clap-trap nonsense. History tells us that lynx in Vermont, at any time in history, is a very rare thing and most likely any spotting of such a critter is the result of a wayward male lynx looking for a place to settle down. It is nonsense for Vermont and other locations, where sustained habitat and available prey is nonexistent, to “protect” a species that, even under the best of conditions, is never going to sustain itself. A simple occasional spotting of a Canada lynx in southern Vermont should be a welcomed indication that the species, overall, is very healthy and doing remarkably well…but to environmentalists, that’s never good enough. 

Also of note, we are repeatedly told that global warming is much the cause of the absence of lynx on the landscape of the United States and yet this particular lynx seems to be traveling outside the southern boundary of its range. We find the same with other species. The hoax of climate change, as presented by a fascist government, becomes only a convenient excuse when control, power and greed are at stake. 

“A lone Canada lynx was photographed in the southern Vermont town of Londonderry this June, marking the first confirmed evidence of lynx in Vermont outside the Northeast Kingdom in decades. Lynx are listed as ‘threatened’ under the federal Endangered Species Act and ‘endangered’ in the state of Vermont.

The lynx was photographed in the back yard of a rural Londonderry home. Biologists with the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department confirmed the identification of the animal from the photos and visited the site to confirm the location of the photos.”<<<Read More>>>

svermontlynx

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