February 21, 2018

USFWS To Begin Work to Remove Canada Lynx from Federal Protection Under ESA

The following link and its landing page will provide the reader with ample links to all the work that is about to begin and what has already been done to remove the Canada lynx from Federal protection under the Endangered Species Act. Please follow this link and scroll down to find other links to recent actions and status assessment.

On January 11, 2018, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced the completion of a scientific review of the Canada lynx in the contiguous United States. The review concludes that the Canada lynx may no longer warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and should be considered for delisting due to recovery. This recommendation is the result of an extensive review of the best available scientific information and almost 20 years of working in partnership with state, federal, tribal, industry and other land managers on the conservation of this species. As a result of this status review, the Service will begin development of a proposed rule to delist the species.

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Canada Lynx: The Comeback Cat

“Biologist Jen Vashon was in the North Woods of Maine, deep in a sea of rolling spruce and fir and a couple hundred miles from any town or paved road.

She wasn’t alone. Peering over the top of a large fallen tree, she spied what she’d come for. Just yards away lay the storied cousin of the bobcat: a Canada lynx, distinguished by its black-tipped tail and ears and long legs with large, furry paws. Snuggled against the lynx were balls of fluff with blue eyes and their own black tufts of fur rising like antennas from the ear.

The Maine biologist was witnessing a nursing female Canada lynx for the first time.

“I was so anxious to get a photo that I called in my crew member, but due to his excitement his approach spooked the cat,” Vashon said. The mother took off, leading her scent away from the litter.

This allowed the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife crew to quickly gather information on the month-old kittens and attach ear tags. The mother’s radio collar that had led them to the den revealed that she lurked nearby. Vashon, with each rise from the den, saw the yellow eyes warily stare back.

The litter became one of 44 litters with a total of 116 kittens that have been tagged and monitored in Maine since 1999. Nearly 100 adults have been tracked with radio collars, all in an effort to better understand the abundance of lynx in the state, their ability to survive and reproduce, and the factors that may limit their numbers.”<<<Read More>>>

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USFWS Begins Process To Delist Canada Lynx From ESA Protection

The self-flogging begins for those animal perverts whose selfish and bizarre world is coming to an end in their eyes. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has announced that it will open a public comment period to receive input on plans to remove the Canada lynx from protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Maine biologists say the state has a minimum of 1,000 animals and is thriving. The head of the Wildlife Alliance of Maine says that 1,000 or 1,200 Canada lynx are not enough – a typical response from animal protectionists who perpetually say there’s never enough of any animal.

We can only expect lawsuits to follow, which, no doubt, will delay and scientific conclusions and actions for at least another decade and cost taxpayers millions of dollars.

It is my opinion that federal, state and local authorities had little to do with the Canada lynx recovery. If we should thank anyone for abundant Canada lynx, it would be the forest industry and spruce budworm for creating prime habitat for the snowshoe hare – the main diet of Canada lynx. When that habitat is gone, so will the snowshoe hare, followed soon thereafter by the Canada lynx that will migrate north or to some other region to find food.

The Federal Government and animal rights groups are misled or intentionally mislead on the myth of “Climate Change.” For this reason, more than likely it will be the convenient basis of lawsuits. The Feds state that “Climate Change” poses no threat to the animal into the near future. Animal rights groups are already saying “Climate Change” poses an immediate threat.

It doesn’t much matter. The system is rigged and will play out as already intended and planned.

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Canada Lynx Are So “Endangered” They Play on People’s Decks

While the moment is presented as a unique opportunity for a photographer in Alaska to take pictures of a family of Canada lynx hanging out on his deck, it also shows the inanity of the U.S. Federal Government, and the useful idiots who enable them, spending millions of dollars protecting a species that doesn’t even come close to being endangered or threatened in any way.

But, we are living in an insane and post normal existence now.

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Two Lynx Share Brief Conversation on Road Near Kokadjo

Read More here, but I think the statements that indicate there aren’t enough Canada lynx around is just typical propaganda.

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Maine Lynx Trapping Case Ends with Anti-Hunters Conceding Defeat

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit officially dismissed an appeal brought by animal-rights organizations concerning the trapping of Canada lynx in Maine, likely ending a multi-year, multi-lawsuit court battle concerning the protections offered the predator in the state.<<<Read More>>>

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Sportsmen’s Alliance, Maine Trappers Victorious in Lynx Lawsuit

Press Release from the Sportsmen’s Alliance:

On Wednesday, Feb. 15, U.S. District Judge Jon Levy issued his ruling in a lawsuit that sought to revoke the state of Maine’s Incidental Take Permit (ITP), which would open individual trappers to Endangered Species Act (ESA) violations. Judge Levy ruled the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s use and application of ITPs were lawful and in keeping with the requirements of the ESA.

The ruling is a clear victory for the Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation, trappers in Maine and the Maine Department of Inland Fish and Wildlife. In his ruling, Judge Levy found that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s “actions were in keeping with the requirements of the Endangered Species Act…the National Environmental Policy Act…and the Administrative Procedure Act…”

“We are extremely pleased that District Court Judge Levy has sided with reasonable and responsible management,” said Evan Heusinkveld, Sportsmen’s Alliance president and CEO. “Today’s clear ruling is nothing short of a full victory for trappers, but also hunters and anglers, too. This case had far-reaching implications for how Endangered Species Act policies would be implemented. If anti-hunting organizations can ban all trapping in the areas where protected lynx are found, what[sic] would stop them from banning fishing in streams or rivers that contain[sic] endangered fish species?”

The case, filed by the anti-hunting and anti-trapping groups Center for Biological Diversity, the Wildlife Alliance of Maine, the Animal Welfare Institute and Friends of Animals, was essentially a backdoor attempt to use the Endangered Species Act to stop trapping in the state. At the heart of the legal battle were Incidental Take Permits, which are granted under the ESA and provide for limited, incidental taking of federally protected species. Without such protection, individual trappers and state wildlife agencies could be held liable for ESA violations every time a lynx was accidentally caught in a legal trap.

“Today is a great day for Maine trappers, and this judgment vindicates the great work of the Maine Department of Inland Fish and Wildlife,” said James Cote, director of government affairs for the Maine Trappers Association. “We are so pleased with this outcome, which is positive for trappers and Canada[sic] lynx alike, and that wouldn’t have been possible without our partnership with the Sportsmen’s Alliance.”

Canada lynx, which are listed as a threatened species in the U.S. due to fragmented populations at the southernmost range of their habitat, are abundant north of the border in Canada. In fact, there are many who believe that the lynx populations should be removed from the ESA altogether.

This is not the first time that the Sportsmen’s Alliance and Maine trappers have prevailed in trapping litigation. In 2010, we successfully defended against a similar lawsuit that also tried to use the Endangered Species Act to stop trapping. That case paved the way for trapping to continue.

Joining the Sportsmen’s Alliance Foundation in the most recent case was the Maine Trappers Association and the National Trappers Association.

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We’re All Gonna Die! Or Maybe Just the Canada Lynx

But never fear the Climate-Changemongers are doing the best they can to earn money and retire with cushy pensions.

I read recently that a former employee of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Mark McCollough, who went to work for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and has since been protected by his government agency, is planning to speak in Bangor on his, and others, strategies to save the Canada lynx from “Climate Change.”

What a scam!

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Are We Making a Big Mistake Protecting All These Animal Species?

I grew up in the woods of Maine. It seemed everyday I was in the woods and at least adjacent to them. I rarely saw the wild animals that everyone is seeing today. Is this a good or bad thing?

I never saw a black bear in the wild until I was an adult. Now I am dodging them with my car. I think I saw a bobcat once. Now, we readily see photos of them in the news. Coyotes were unheard of and those claiming to have seen one was laughed at. Today they have become a nuisance in numbers. I saw a moose once standing in the middle of the road drooling. It was a bull and he didn’t really look so hot. Today, all we hear is of the hundreds, perhaps thousands of moose dying each season from winter ticks. Maybe the increase in moose and ticks are related. Lynx was something we called sausages. Now, they are quite often run over by cars. Deer were quite common and seldom did our freezer go empty – it was a necessary thing to have venison to eat through the winter. We were poor.

It seems that today, the cry is persistent to protect any and every kind of animal. Part of what’s wrong with this demand is that it is spurred on by people insisting they want to see these animals in their back yards or from the comfort of the automobiles. I think back to the many, many years of putting on countless miles in the woods and the comparatively less abundance of wildlife. Today, the demands are such that it’s time to revisit just what in the hell we are doing and for what purpose are we doing it.

The results of an overabundance of any one or a number of wildlife species are never any good…at least for the animals. Biology 101 taught us about the diseases that happen when too many of any one animal is crowded into limited space. Space is relative and as ignorant humans, who love to put human traits on every animal, and that live in comparatively close quarters, we may not understand the consequences of protecting wild animals for our own selfish desires.

Cross-breeding of species is happening now at what appears an alarming rate. Not that long ago we heard of a polar bear crossing with a grizzly. Why did that happen? We now know that there really is no such thing as a “pure” wolf. So-called wolves and coyotes, we discover, are nothing more than a hybrid of species. And, I think I am just scratching the surface. Each species carries with it recognizable traits. What happens when species cross? We don’t know. What we do know is often behaviors change and that presents a entire host of other possibilities, the most of which are never any good.

Today, I read about how the Canada lynx, a species of wild cat that is protected by the U.S. Federal Government, as well as some Canadian governments, has been cross breeding with bobcats. The article mentioning this event says, “..biologists are finding a surprise: lynx are mating with bobcats in New Brunswick, creating fertile hybrids.

“It’s a pretty good cross between them,” Libby said. “They look like a bobcat, but they have really long black tufts on the ends of their ears and a little bit larger feet.”

What does this really mean? How will this event change the characteristics of the offspring and the continual breeding and cross breeding of cross breeds, etc.? We don’t know. Each species comes equipped with certain physical traits to aid in their survival. Will cross breeding alter those traits in ways that become detrimental to the species we are trying to protect? Is this a common occurrence that we are just now discovering, or is this rare and due to other circumstances, like over protecting a species or two, forcing overlaps that result in cross breeding?

One of the problems this country is facing is the perpetuated nonsense that somehow man must be removed from the fields and forests in order that the wild species can do whatever it is they are going to do with no help from man. It was never intended to be this way, nor does that proposal work real well.

It is hoped that this perverse pendulum will get to wherever it is headed and swing back to something more closely resembling sanity before we have destroyed our wildlife thinking we are saving it.

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Last Time I Checked Canada Lynx Also Eat During Summers in Maine

In a recent article I just read about Canada lynx in Maine, the author said:

“The environment in Maine is perfect to support Canada lynx populations. Harsh winters, deep snow, dense evergreen forests and sub-zero temperatures are exactly what the lynx likes.

“…Some believe both lynx and coyotes would compete for the same food, but during a recent 12-year study, it was found that is not the case. Lynx roam the deep snow without problems, while coyotes travel more in packs along trails and road systems, and are more likely to attack larger prey, such as deer.”

I have not read, nor do I know, what 12-year study on lynx the author refers to. However, I grew up in Maine and lived there year round for nearly 50 years. I’ve experienced some of those “harsh” Maine winters, with snow depths reaching in excess of 100 inches. I can also tell you with certainty that those conditions, even in northern Maine, do not persist throughout the year. Snow melts in Spring, Summers are warm and Fall can extend well into December.

The question should become, what do Canada lynx eat during the majority of the year when it doesn’t have the advantage over coyotes to stay on top of the snow? If the deep, soft snow persists in northern Maine for 4 months, does the lynx fast for the remaining 8 months? Perhaps the coyote and lynx have some kind of mutual convention in which they discuss which days of the week they will eat?

The Canada lynx is NOT an endangered or threatened species. Environmentalism has caused the brainwashing of non-thinkers to believe that even an animal that periodically inhabits fringes of its normal habitat, must be protected at all costs, and there is little understanding of the realities that exist. Putting out nonsense that coyotes and lynx don’t compete with each other for food, is dishonest at best. The author’s description of what happens in the depth of winter in Maine is, for the most part, accurate. However, the coyotes and lynx must eat to survive the remainder of the year, which happens to be the majority of the year. Why is not that aspect of lynx survival discussed?

 

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