April 24, 2017

Wildlife Habitat Protected, Access Improved in Nevada

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation worked with a conservation-minded landowner, the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) and the USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) to protect 4,500 acres of key wildlife habitat in northeast Nevada via a voluntary conservation easement agreement. The project also improves access to nearly 19,000 acres of adjacent public land.

“We appreciate Bryan Masini and his partner owners of the Wildhorse Ranch in recognizing the importance of protecting and conserving the wildlife values of their land,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

Located approximately 70 miles north of Elko, the property lies within the Owyhee River watershed just east of the Independence Mountain Range.

As part of the transaction, the NDOW holds an access agreement that allows public access for hunting and other recreational activities to the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest and Bureau of Land Management lands which border the ranch.

“We are grateful for all the partners in this effort and find great hope in innovative approaches such as this conservation easement,” said Tony Wasley, NDOW director. “This is a great solution that protects private land, while also maintaining the land’s benefits for the wildlife species that depend on it.”

“This specific area is year-round habitat and crucial summer range for up to 100 elk. It’s also a key area for mule deer and antelope, crucial habitat for Greater sage-grouse and it features riparian habitat for fish and other species,” added Henning.

Current range conditions consist of enough forage for cattle and wildlife and a plan has been implemented to ensure that best management practices maintain quality habitat going forward.

“This project is a great example of the private and public partnership efforts that exist to protect critical habitats and preserve agricultural working lands for future generations,” stated Ray Dotson, NRCS state conservationist.

The Natural Resource Conservation Service’s Agricultural Conservation Easement Program and the Nevada Department of Wildlife provided funding for the project.

Colorado Elk Herd in the Crosshairs

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is raising a word of warning about a “quiet” movement in Colorado seeking to place wolves on the landscape. It also has grave concerns about the tactics used by environmentalists and animal rights groups behind such efforts.

A representative of a wolf advocacy group, the Turner Endangered Species Fund, recently addressed a gathering of Colorado citizens claiming the placement of wolves on the Colorado landscape is “most germane” to the state’s future, and added “there’s no downside and there’s a real big upside.”

RMEF strongly disputes those claims.

“Wolves have a measureable and oftentimes detrimental impact on big game management wherever they go. Their reintroduction into the Northern Rocky Mountains led to a reduction of the Northern Yellowstone herd by more than 80 percent,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “Among other things, wolves also greatly reduced elk numbers to dangerously low levels in central Idaho and have a profound impact on declining moose and deer populations in the Western Great Lakes region.”

The Northern Yellowstone Elk herd numbered more than 19,000 before wolf reintroduction in the mid-1990s but dropped below 4,000 in 2012. Increasing grizzly, black bear and mountain lion populations also played a role in the decline. Minnesota’s moose population numbered approximately 8,840 in 2006 but since dropped 55 percent to an estimated 4,020 in 2016.

“We have also witnessed time and time again that pro-wolf groups seek to ignore agreed upon population recovery goals, thus moving the goals posts, so to speak, by filing obstructionist lawsuits designed to drag out or deny the delisting process altogether and allowing wolf populations to soar well above agreed upon levels,” said Allen. “These groups totally ignore what they themselves agree to once they get wolves on the landscape and they use lawsuits to manipulate the system, ignoring state-based management. And, in many cases the American taxpayers are paying for their legal fees,” Allen added.

Animal rights groups filed at least nine lawsuits regarding wolf populations in the Northern Rockies and at least six others affecting wolves in the Western Great Lakes, as well as several others that have impacted the listing status of wolves across the contiguous 48 states. Currently, two cases are pending in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, affecting listing status in Wyoming and in the Western Great Lake states.

As part of the wolf reintroduction efforts in the mid-1990s, federal and state agencies agreed to delist wolves and place them under state management when the original minimum recovery levels reached 100 wolves each in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Wolves met those delisting standards in 2002 but 2015 minimum populations were nearly 500 percent above that—786 in Idaho, 536 in Montana and 382 in Wyoming. The original population objective for wolves in the Western Great Lakes was 1,350 but at last count the overall minimum population numbered greater than 3,600.

Though well above minimum population levels, federal protections remain in place for wolves in the Western Great Lakes region and Wyoming due to environmental lawsuits.

“An unhealthy and litigious precedent has been set that once pro-wolf groups get a foot in the reintroduction door, they kick it open and file lawsuit after lawsuit to stymy the delisting process while using the wolf as a fundraising tool. Colorado’s elk population will be next in the crosshairs,” cautioned Allen. ”And by the way wolves are nowhere near endangered.”

Wyoming Project Secures Access to 47,000 Acres of Public Land

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—Hunters, anglers, hikers and those who enjoy other forms of outdoor recreation will benefit from a recent Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation project in Wyoming.

RMEF worked with a private landowner, Linda Zager, and several other partners to permanently protect and open access to 160 acres of prime elk and riparian habitat in southwest Wyoming.

“This small piece of property provides important habitat for elk and other wildlife but since we conveyed it to the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), it is also now open to the public and improves additional access to approximately 47,000 acres of surrounding public land,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer.

The tract is nestled in the Wyoming Range at the confluence of Miller and La Barge Creeks which feature vital spawning and rearing habitat for the Colorado River cutthroat trout. In addition, it provides winter range for elk and is a key migration route for elk, moose, mule deer and other wildlife.

RMEF also worked with the BLM and a local contractor to repair what was an impassible road through the property.

The project links the Lake Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Miller Mountain Management Area, additional BLM lands and the Bridger-Teton National Forest while also providing public access and parking.

The Land and Water Conservation Fund’s Sportsmen Recreational Access and RMEF provided funding for this project.

Elk Country Conservation Month Comes to Bass Pro Shops

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—Beginning August 1st, Bass Pro Shops will show its support for elk, elk habitat and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation for the tenth consecutive year by sponsoring Elk Country Conservation Month.

“We are grateful for and appreciate the continued support of a company that is such a dedicated conservation partner,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “Bass Pro Shops continues to demonstrate its leadership and commitment to fish and wildlife conservation, our hunting heritage and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation through this promotion and their matching gift.”

During the month of August, in-store patrons who visit Bass Pro Shops across the United States can “round up for elk country,” or, in other words, round up their purchases to support RMEF’s mission.

“We want to give our customers the opportunity to contribute to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and its great mission to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage,” said Martin MacDonald, Bass Pro Shops director of conservation. “Bass Pro Shops founder Johnny Morris also established a matching donation program from Bass Pro to Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. We donate an additional 50 percent of the cumulative customer donations during the month of August.”

Since 1984, RMEF and its partners have completed 10,198 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects with a combined value of more than $1 billion. These projects protected or enhanced more than 6.8 million acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 911,000 acres.

Sensible Statement About Predators

“The issue is not wolves, it’s the combination of wolves, grizzly bears, black bears and cougars,” Bob Jamieson, a systems ecologist and environmental consultant, told the paper. “The prey species can’t handle the combined impact of those four animals,” he said. “A lot of people [blame] habitat problems because they don’t want [to] wrap their head around the predator issue.”<<<Read More>>>

National Elk Summit Coming to RMEF Headquarters

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will host representatives from 18 states and two federal agencies at a two-day summit May 3-4, 2016.

The conference will address successes, challenges and strategies affecting elk populations, public lands management, habitat, hunting, public access, scientific research, disease and other timely topics.

“This is an invaluable opportunity for us to rub shoulders with our partner agencies that do so much to look after elk and elk country,” said Blake Henning, RMEF vice president of Lands and Conservation. “It also gives the state and federal agencies a chance to discuss commonly-held challenges and solutions to a myriad of land and wildlife issues.”

Directors or assistant directors from Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Idaho, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming will participate. Other states may also offer written updates about their elk populations. Additional representatives from the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and RMEF will attend.

Steven Rinella, award-winning author, RMEF life member and host of the TV Show MeatEater,will address the summit as well as RMEF President/CEO David Allen, other RMEF executive staff and board members.

“RMEF remains committed to ensuring the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage by offering financial and other means of support to state and federal agencies. We look forward to working together to make that happen,” added Henning.

RMEF assisted with successful elk restoration projects in Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Wisconsin and is offering assistance for ongoing efforts in West Virginia.

As of March 31, 2016, RMEF and its partners have completed 9,966 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects with a combined value of more than $1 billion. These projects have protected or enhanced more than 6.8 million acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 852,628 acres.

RMEF hosted its first national elk summit in June of 2013.

New Mexico Road Easement Opens Door to Public Access

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation teamed up with the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and New Mexico State Land Office to provide funding for a continual two-mile right-of-way road easement that provides hunter access to 52,000 acres of public and State Trust Lands in west-central New Mexico.

“Opening and securing public access remains at the heart of our conservation mission,” said Blake Henning, RMEF vice president of Lands and Conservation. “Luera Road provides the only hunter access to this New Mexico State Trust property in Catron County.”

The landscape provides quality habitat for elk, deer, black bear, cougar and wild turkey in the Luera Mountains.

“This project is a good example of a cooperative effort between the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, the State Land Office and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation,” said Alexandra Sandoval, director for the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. “By helping fund this easement, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation has provided public access to prime elk habitat that would otherwise be inaccessible to the public. It demonstrates the importance of collaborative partnerships for the benefit of sportsmen and women.”

“New Mexico’s State Trust Lands offer ample hunting terrain with abundant wildlife, and we are pleased to work together with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Department of Game and Fish in the spirit of allowing proper hunting access to these lands while also managing them prudently for the benefit of future generations,” said New Mexico State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn.

RMEF has a long conservation history in New Mexico. To date, RMEF and its partners completed 333 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects with a combined value of more than $39.3 million. These projects have protected or enhanced 497,624 acres of habitat.

The Cover-Up of Wolves and What They DO!

By James Beers

Please note the picture below.  It is a late-March of 2016 picture from Wyoming and you will probably never see it again nor even hear of it.  You see:

–       Wolves don’t do such things.

–       Elk, like Minnesota moose, are disappearing due to global warming and ticks and definitely not wolf predation.

–       It is a Myth (like the time Kermit the Frog yelled, “it’s a Myth, Myth” and Miss Piggy comes on stage saying, “Yeth, Yeth”) that wolves eradicate game animals and hunting.

–       Protecting livestock like sheep and cattle from wolves means simply exerting a Little Effort like 24/27 shepherds and guard dogs and electric fences and fladry and noise makers and taste aversion and tank traps (I just made that one up) –none of which work more than temporarily.

–       Wolves are good for “the ecosystem” (which is whatever you want to make of “it” from the ecosystem in your yard to the North American Continent).

–       Wolves are wonderful to hear howling, it is a sign of “wilderness”.  (Please note, everywhere wolves now occur in the Lower 48 States, coyotes were or are present.  Coyotes once howled and yipped in the evenings but in the presence of wolves they quickly learn to remain silent because when wolves hear them they zero in on them and kill them at every opportunity.)

All of the above are lies believed by an urban general public that: A.) Does not live with nor is not affected by wolves, B.) Feels guilty about European settlement of North America or the presence of plants and animals not present here before 1492 when Columbus set foot on a Caribbean beach, or C.) Desires to eliminate all human use or ownership of animals from hunting and animal husbandry to animal control and the right to bear arms.

Organizations that raise millions from such folks will do whatever they must to keep reporting of and especially such pictures of wolf carnage from being published or circulated.

Federal politicians that passed the unjust laws that began the wolf introductions and protections do not want such publicity to unmask the perfidy of what they have done.

Current federal politicians that ignore this issue and refuse to give any more than lip service (tsk, tsk, etc.) to solving what their predecessors wrought do not want such publicity about their ongoing cowardly betrayal of rural Americans.

Federal bureaucrats utilizing the wolf carnage and the un-Constitutional laws that give them powers superior to states and the Constitution simply lie, shrug and blame others like a professional boxer jokingly “sparring” with amateurs.  The increased power and salary and retirement this gives them; makes them ruthless in suppressing photos and reporting about such carnage.

State bureaucrats, likewise bob and weave with a “me-too” alibi that mimics their federal “partners” malarkey about “wolves never”, “wolves always”, “global warming”, phony “counts”, etc.  Like the drivers of the “getaway car” they are complicit up to their ears in the whole scam for their own benefit camouflaged as “ecosystem beneficence”.

The media (TV News, Newspapers, Documentaries, Magazines, etc.) have all bought in to the kindly wolf myths for reasons as diverse as; “it sells”, “we get money to do so”, “our staffs are all urban ideologues”, “our political ideology/Party supports this for votes”, to “our teachers filled our heads with so much mush in school that we are incapable of seeing the truth of the matter.”

A few facts you won’t hear elsewhere:

–       Wolves frequently kill wintering deer or elk in large numbers without eating them just like a pack of domestic dogs that get loose will kill chickens or sheep they encounter for what we mistakenly call “fun” but is in reality the same thing Indians did when they drove buffalo over cliffs in numbers far exceeding what they could or ever eat or otherwise utilize.

–       A couple of years ago on the Wyoming/Idaho border a wolf pack killed a hundred and some sheep for “fun” one dark night.

–       Wolves have destroyed Minnesota moose hunting by depleting Minnesota moose.

–       Wolves have all but destroyed the once 20,000 elk in the Northern Yellowstone elk herd just as they are doing to moose, elk and deer in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington, Wisconsin, and will do in Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado and Texas if the federal government forces them into those states.

–       It is not at all uncommon that wolves hamstring (tear the tendons in the rear legs thus causing the animal to collapse helplessly) pregnant elk, moose, cows, ewes, does, etc. with developed fetuses and then immediately while the adult female lives to begin tearing out the anal area to make a big enough hole to pull out and devour the fetus and then leave the cow, doe, ewe, etc. to die a horrible, lingering and painful (for all you animal rights/wolf advocates) death.

–       As big game goes in the West, so goes ranching and rural communities.

–       Wolves are spreading down through Illinois and Indiana and Missouri to infest Arkansas, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee from which they are expected to “hook up with” (to coin a modern expression) government wolves and coyotes and dogs (making puppies along the way) in the Carolinas and in Oklahoma and Texas rolling Eastward from New Mexico.

The same things are happening in Europe.  As Europeans do their minuets with Islamic terrorists, wolves are all over now for the first time in a few hundred years and they are increasing in numbers and densities.  Formerly efficient use of suburban/rural forage by sheep and shepherds has been and is being violently and terminally (?) ended as wolf predation, mostly unarmed shepherds, and insane wolf protections combines to kill thousands of sheep annually and put many shepherds “on the dole”.  Rural life is, as in US “wolf country”, less profitable and more dangerous for unarmed citizens, children and the elderly.  When the Lufthansa pilot flew his airplane into the Alps, one of the policemen guarding the site for several days opined, “Our biggest worry was ALL THE WOLVES scavenging the site and consuming human body parts!”  Ask yourself; where else have you heard or will you hear any of this?

Jim Beers

25 March 2016

If you found this worthwhile, please share it with others.  Thanks.

Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC.  He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands.  He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC.  He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority.  He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.

Jim Beers is available to speak or for consulting. 

You can receive future articles by sending a request with your e-mail address to:   jimbeers7@comcast.net

18DeadElk

If It Acts and Looks Like a Wolf Chasing Elk…it’s a Dog

Brian Nostrant took a photo from his home on Thursday of what appeared to be a wolf chasing elk on Mount Jumbo. He said he was looking out his window when he noticed the elk in an absolute panic.

Vivica Crowser with Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks said a wildlife biologist investigated the tracks, which lead back to the L- Trail, and determined they were a dog’s tracks.

Source: KTVH | Helena News | Great Falls News

Chronic Wasting Disease vaccine fails elk test | WyoFile

*Editor’s Note* – Take notice in this article that the Sierra Club says this reinforces their belief that there needs to be more wolves because they would kill off the sick elk. Yessiree Mistah! The brains of a slug.

The state wildlife veterinarian told Wyoming Game and Fish commissioners that a vaccine to fight Chronic Wasting Disease appears to have failed in a test among live elk.

Dr. Mary Wood cautioned that her findings are preliminary, that they haven’t been peer-reviewed or published, and that there is a hiccup in the study. Nevertheless, she said the live tests revealed a statistically significant difference showing the vaccine to be ineffective.

Source: Chronic Wasting Disease vaccine fails elk test | WyoFile