November 29, 2021

Obama Grants Self Continued Power to Spy – For National Security of Course

Notice of March 29, 2016

Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities

On April 1, 2015, by Executive Order 13694, I declared a national emergency pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States constituted by the increasing prevalence and severity of malicious cyber-enabled activities originating from, or directed by persons located, in whole or in substantial part, outside the United States. These significant malicious cyber-enabled activities continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States. For this reason, the national emergency declared on April 1, 2015, and the measures adopted on that date to deal with that emergency, must continue in effect beyond April 1, 2016. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13694.

This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and transmitted to the Congress.

THE WHITE HOUSE, March 29, 2016. [FR Doc. 2016-07540 Filed 3-30-16; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F6-P

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By Executive Order, President Ensures He Can Use Internet for Spying…For Our Protection.

Executive Order — Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity

EXECUTIVE ORDER

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COMMISSION ON ENHANCING NATIONAL CYBERSECURITY

For businesses their security is the most important aspect, that is why they hire companies like this one https://www.sapphire.net/ that have more than 25 years of experience in cybersecurity to keep their business safe.

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to enhance cybersecurity awareness and protections at all levels of Government, business, and society, to protect privacy, to ensure public safety and economic and national security, and to empower Americans to take better control of their digital security, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Establishment. There is established within the Department of Commerce the Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity (Commission).

Sec. 2. Membership. (a) The Commission shall be composed of not more than 12 members appointed by the President. The members of the Commission may include those with knowledge about or experience in cybersecurity, the digital economy, national security and law enforcement, corporate governance, risk management, information technology (IT), privacy, identity management, Internet governance and standards, government administration, digital and social media, communications, or any other area determined by the President to be of value to the Commission. The Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives, the Majority Leader of the Senate, and the Minority Leader of the Senate are each invited to recommend one individual for membership on the Commission. No federally registered lobbyist or person presently otherwise employed by the Federal Government may serve on the Commission.

(b) The President shall designate one member of the Commission to serve as the Chair and one member of the Commission to serve as the Vice Chair.

Sec. 3. Mission and Work. The Commission will make detailed recommendations to strengthen cybersecurity in both the public and private sectors while protecting privacy, ensuring public safety and economic and national security, fostering discovery and development of new technical solutions, and bolstering partnerships between Federal, State, and local government and the private sector in the development, promotion, and use of cybersecurity technologies, policies, and best practices. The Commission’s recommendations should address actions that can be taken over the next decade to accomplish these goals.

(a) In developing its recommendations, the Commission shall identify and study actions necessary to further improve cybersecurity awareness, risk management, and adoption of best practices throughout the private sector and at all levels of government. These areas of study may include methods to influence the way individuals and organizations perceive and use technology and approach cybersecurity as consumers and providers in the digital economy; demonstrate the nature and severity of cybersecurity threats, the importance of mitigation, and potential ways to manage and reduce the economic impacts of cyber risk; improve access to the knowledge needed to make informed cyber risk management decisions related to privacy, economic impact, and business continuity; and develop partnerships with industry, civil society, and international stakeholders. At a minimum, the Commission shall develop recommendations regarding:

(i) how best to bolster the protection of systems and data, including how to advance identity management, authentication, and cybersecurity of online identities, in light of technological developments and other trends;

(ii) ensuring that cybersecurity is a core element of the technologies associated with the Internet of Things and cloud computing, and that the policy and legal foundation for cybersecurity in the context of the Internet of Things is stable and adaptable;

(iii) further investments in research and development initiatives that can enhance cybersecurity;

(iv) increasing the quality, quantity, and level of expertise of the cybersecurity workforce in the Federal Government and private sector, including through education and training;

(v) improving broad-based education of commonsense cybersecurity practices for the general public; and

(vi) any other issues that the President, through the Secretary of Commerce (Secretary), requests the Commission to consider.

(b) In developing its recommendations, the Commission shall also identify and study advances in technology, management, and IT service delivery that should be developed, widely adopted, or further tested throughout the private sector and at all levels of government, and in particular in the Federal Government and by critical infrastructure owners and operators. These areas of study may include cybersecurity technologies and other advances that are responsive to the rapidly evolving digital economy, and approaches to accelerating the introduction and use of emerging methods designed to enhance early detection, mitigation, and management of cyber risk in the security and privacy, and business and governance sectors. At a minimum, the Commission shall develop recommendations regarding:

(i) governance, procurement, and management processes for Federal civilian IT systems, applications, services, and infrastructure, including the following:

(A) a framework for identifying which IT services should be developed internally or shared across agencies, and for specific investment priorities for all such IT services;

(B) a framework to ensure that as Federal civilian agencies procure, modernize, or upgrade their IT systems, cybersecurity is incorporated into the process;

(C) a governance model for managing cybersecurity risk, enhancing resilience, and ensuring appropriate incident response and recovery in the operations of, and delivery of goods and services by, the Federal Government; and

(D) strategies to overcome barriers that make it difficult for the Federal Government to adopt and keep pace with industry best practices;

(ii) effective private sector and government approaches to critical infrastructure protection in light of current and projected trends in cybersecurity threats and the connected nature of the United States economy;

(iii) steps State and local governments can take to enhance cybersecurity, and how the Federal Government can best support such steps; and

(iv) any other issues that the President, through the Secretary, requests the Commission to consider.

(c) To accomplish its mission, the Commission shall:

(i) reference and, as appropriate, build on successful existing cybersecurity policies, public-private partnerships, and other initiatives;

(ii) consult with cybersecurity, national security and law enforcement, privacy, management, technology, and digital economy experts in the public and private sectors;

(iii) seek input from those who have experienced significant cybersecurity incidents to understand lessons learned from these experiences, including identifying any barriers to awareness, risk management, and investment;

(iv) review reported information from the Office of Management and Budget regarding Federal information and information systems, including legacy systems, in order to assess critical Federal civilian IT infrastructures, governance, and management processes;

(v) review the impact of technological trends and market forces on existing cybersecurity policies and practices; and

(vi) examine other issues related to the Commission’s mission that the Chair and Vice Chair agree are necessary and appropriate to the Commission’s work.

(d) Where appropriate, the Commission may conduct original research, commission studies, and hold hearings to further examine particular issues.

(e) The Commission shall be advisory in nature and shall submit a final report to the President by December 1, 2016. This report shall be published on a public website along with any appropriate response from the President within 45 days after it is provided to the President.

Sec. 4. Administration. (a) The Commission shall hold periodic meetings in public forums in an open and transparent environment.

(b) In carrying out its mission, the Commission shall be informed by, and shall strive to avoid duplicating, the efforts of other governmental entities.

(c) The Commission shall have a staff, headed by an Executive Director, which shall provide support for the functions of the Commission. The Secretary shall appoint the Executive Director, who shall be a full-time Federal employee, and the Commission’s staff. The Executive Director may also serve as the Designated Federal Officer in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, 5 U.S.C. App. (FACA, the “Act”).

(d) The Executive Director, in consultation with the Chair and Vice Chair, shall have the authority to create subcommittees as necessary to support the Commission’s work and to examine particular areas of importance. These subcommittees must report their work to the Commission to inform its final recommendations.

(e) The Secretary will work with the heads of executive departments and agencies, to the extent permitted by law and consistent with their ongoing activities, to provide the Commission such information and cooperation as it may require for purposes of carrying out its mission.

Sec. 5. Termination. The Commission shall terminate within 15 days after it presents its final report to the President, unless extended by the President.

Sec. 6. General Provisions. (a) To the extent permitted by law, and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Secretary shall direct the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology to provide the Commission with such expertise, services, funds, facilities, staff, equipment, and other support services as may be necessary to carry out its mission.

(b) Insofar as FACA may apply to the Commission, any functions of the President under that Act, except for those in section 6 and section 14 of that Act, shall be performed by the Secretary.

(c) Members of the Commission shall serve without any compensation for their work on the Commission, but shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, to the extent permitted by law for persons serving intermittently in the Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).

(d) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to a department, agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(e) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
February 9, 2016.

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Fascist Obama’s Executive Order on Guns

*Editor’s Note* – In an interview with reporters last night, Hitler and Himmler President Obama and Loretta Lynch shared what would be in the president’s Executive Order on gun control, said to be publicly released this morning. As is noted below, people, particularly seniors should take concern over the statement that the Social Security Administration will make rules to prohibit CERTAIN SS recipients from owning guns.

As with the Weimar Republic in Germany in 1928, and the Hitler Regime that followed, certain groups and classes of people were targeted (anyone perceived as a threat, not just Jews) in order to prohibit the buying and/or owning of any kind of weapon, including knives and baseball bats. As was the case in Germany, no definitive guidelines were established to list qualifications and disqualifications, leaving that up to the Reichkommissar to decide.

In addition to the new guidance on who must obtain a firearms license, Valerie Jarrett announced that the president would require the Social Security Administration to begin the rule-making process for prohibiting certain Social Security recipients from legally obtaining guns, a move that could bar millions from legally owning firearms.

Source: Obama Executive Order on Guns

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Executive Order — Using Behavioral Science Insights to Better Serve the American People

*Editor’s Note* – All emboldening is mine as well as added [ ]s.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

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USING BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE INSIGHTS TO BETTER SERVE THE AMERICAN PEOPLE

A growing body of evidence demonstrates that behavioral science insights — research findings from fields such as behavioral economics and psychology about how people make decisions and act on them — can be used to design government policies to better serve the American people. [it’s actually the reverse of this]

Where Federal policies have been designed to reflect behavioral science insights, they have substantially improved[destroyed] outcomes for the individuals, families, communities, and businesses those policies serve. For example, automatic enrollment and automatic escalation in retirement savings plans have made it easier to save for the future, and have helped Americans accumulate billions of dollars in additional retirement savings. [benefits banking] Similarly, streamlining the application process for Federal financial aid has made college more financially accessible for millions of students.

To more fully realize the benefits of behavioral insights and deliver better results at a lower cost for the American people, the Federal Government should design its policies and programs to reflect our best understanding of how people engage with, participate in, use, and respond to those policies and programs. By improving the effectiveness and efficiency of Government [oxymoron], behavioral science insights can support a range of national priorities, including helping workers to find better jobs; enabling Americans to lead longer, healthier lives; improving access to educational opportunities and support for success in school; and accelerating the transition to a low-carbon economy. [This actually tells the whole story. The purpose of a “low-carbon” economy is for scarcity and repression/depression. Thus everything suggested here is the exact opposite of reality.]

NOW, THEREFORE, by the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, I hereby direct the following:

Section 1. Behavioral Science Insights Policy Directive.

(a) Executive departments and agencies (agencies) are encouraged to:

(i) identify policies, programs, and operations where applying behavioral science insights may yield substantial improvements in public welfare, program outcomes, and program cost effectiveness;

(ii) develop strategies for applying behavioral science insights to programs and, where possible, rigorously test and evaluate the impact of these insights;

(iii) recruit behavioral science experts to join the Federal Government as necessary to achieve the goals of this directive; and

(iv) strengthen agency relationships with the research community to better use empirical findings from the behavioral sciences.

(b) In implementing the policy directives in section (a), agencies shall:

(i) identify opportunities to help qualifying individuals, families, communities, and businesses access public programs and benefits by, as appropriate, streamlining processes that may otherwise limit or delay participation — for example, removing administrative hurdles, shortening wait times, and simplifying forms;

(ii) improve how information is presented to consumers, borrowers, program beneficiaries, and other individuals, whether as directly conveyed by the agency, or in setting standards for the presentation of information, by considering how the content, format, timing, and medium by which information is conveyed affects comprehension and action by individuals, as appropriate;

(iii) identify programs that offer choices and carefully consider how the presentation and structure of those choices, including the order, number, and arrangement of options, can most effectively promote public welfare, as appropriate, giving particular consideration to the selection and setting of default options; and

(iv) review elements of their policies and programs that are designed to encourage or make it easier for Americans to take specific actions, such as saving for retirement or completing education programs. In doing so, agencies shall consider how the timing, frequency, presentation, and labeling of benefits, taxes, subsidies, and other incentives can more effectively and efficiently promote those actions, as appropriate. Particular attention should be paid to opportunities to use nonfinancial incentives.

(c) For policies with a regulatory component, agencies are encouraged to combine this behavioral science insights policy directive with their ongoing review of existing significant regulations to identify and reduce regulatory burdens, as appropriate and consistent with Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review), and Executive Order 13610 of May 10, 2012 (Identifying and Reducing Regulatory Burdens).

Sec. 2. Implementation of the Behavioral Science Insights Policy Directive. (a) The Social and Behavioral Sciences Team (SBST), under the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) and chaired by the Assistant to the President for Science and Technology, shall provide agencies with advice and policy guidance to help them execute the policy objectives outlined in section 1 of this order, as appropriate.

(b) The NSTC shall release a yearly report summarizing agency implementation of section 1 of this order each year until 2019. Member agencies of the SBST are expected to contribute to this report.

(c) To help execute the policy directive set forth in section 1 of this order, the Chair of the SBST shall, within 45 days of the date of this order and thereafter as necessary, issue guidance to assist agencies in implementing this order.

Sec. 3. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to a department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) Independent agencies are strongly encouraged to comply with the requirements of this order.

(d) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
September 15, 2015.

This could all be easily reduced to a few words: The government will create policy while making you think you are participating. Those policies are created by the government through Behavioral Science Insights, and are used to manipulation the responses by the citizen-subjects.

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Executive Order: Obama Declares National Emergency

From the White House:

Executive Order — “Blocking the Property of Certain Persons Engaging in Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities”

EXECUTIVE ORDER

– – – – – – –

BLOCKING THE PROPERTY OF CERTAIN PERSONS ENGAGING IN

SIGNIFICANT MALICIOUS CYBER-ENABLED ACTIVITIES

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) (IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) (NEA), section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952 (8 U.S.C. 1182(f)), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code,

I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, find that the increasing prevalence and severity of malicious cyber-enabled activities originating from, or directed by persons located, in whole or in substantial part, outside the United States constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States. I hereby declare a national emergency to deal with this threat.

Accordingly, I hereby order:

Section 1. (a) All property and interests in property that are in the United States, that hereafter come within the United States, or that are or hereafter come within the possession or control of any United States person of the following persons are blocked and may not be transferred, paid, exported, withdrawn, or otherwise dealt in:

(i) any person determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of State, to be responsible for or complicit in, or to have engaged in, directly or indirectly, cyber-enabled activities originating from, or directed by persons located, in whole or in substantial part, outside the United States that are reasonably likely to result in, or have materially contributed to, a significant threat to the national security, foreign policy, or economic health or financial stability of the United States and that have the purpose or effect of:

(A) harming, or otherwise significantly compromising the provision of services by, a computer or network of computers that support one or more entities in a critical infrastructure sector;

(B) significantly compromising the provision of services by one or more entities in a critical infrastructure sector;

(C) causing a significant disruption to the availability of a computer or network of computers; or

(D) causing a significant misappropriation of funds or economic resources, trade secrets, personal identifiers, or financial information for commercial or competitive advantage or private financial gain; or

(ii) any person determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of State:

(A) to be responsible for or complicit in, or to have engaged in, the receipt or use for commercial or competitive advantage or private financial gain, or by a commercial entity, outside the United States of trade secrets misappropriated through cyber-enabled means, knowing they have been misappropriated, where the misappropriation of such trade secrets is reasonably likely to result in, or has materially contributed to, a significant threat to the national security, foreign policy, or economic health or financial stability of the United States;

(B) to have materially assisted, sponsored, or provided financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services in support of, any activity described in subsections (a)(i) or (a)(ii)(A) of this section or any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this order;

(C) to be owned or controlled by, or to have acted or purported to act for or on behalf of, directly or indirectly, any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this order; or

(D) to have attempted to engage in any of the activities described in subsections (a)(i) and (a)(ii)(A)-(C) of this section.

(b) The prohibitions in subsection (a) of this section apply except to the extent provided by statutes, or in regulations, orders, directives, or licenses that may be issued pursuant to this order, and notwithstanding any contract entered into or any license or permit granted prior to the effective date of this order.

Sec. 2. I hereby determine that the making of donations of the type of articles specified in section 203(b)(2) of IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 1702(b)(2)) by, to, or for the benefit of any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to section 1 of this order would seriously impair my ability to deal with the national emergency declared in this order, and I hereby prohibit such donations as provided by section 1 of this order.

Sec. 3. The prohibitions in section 1 of this order include but are not limited to:

(a) the making of any contribution or provision of funds, goods, or services by, to, or for the benefit of any person whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this order; and

(b) the receipt of any contribution or provision of funds, goods, or services from any such person.

Sec. 4. I hereby find that the unrestricted immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of aliens determined to meet one or more of the criteria in section 1(a) of this order would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and I hereby suspend entry into the United States, as immigrants or nonimmigrants, of such persons. Such persons shall be treated as persons covered by section 1 of Proclamation 8693 of July 24, 2011 (Suspension of Entry of Aliens Subject to United Nations Security Council Travel Bans and International Emergency Economic Powers Act Sanctions).

Sec. 5. (a) Any transaction that evades or avoids, has the purpose of evading or avoiding, causes a violation of, or attempts to violate any of the prohibitions set forth in this order is prohibited.

(b) Any conspiracy formed to violate any of the prohibitions set forth in this order is prohibited.

Sec. 6. For the purposes of this order:

(a) the term “person” means an individual or entity;

(b) the term “entity” means a partnership, association, trust, joint venture, corporation, group, subgroup, or other organization;

(c) the term “United States person” means any United States citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States (including foreign branches), or any person in the United States;

(d) the term “critical infrastructure sector” means any of the designated critical infrastructure sectors identified in Presidential Policy Directive 21; and

(e) the term “misappropriation” includes any taking or obtaining by improper means, without permission or consent, or under false pretenses.

Sec. 7. For those persons whose property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to this order who might have a constitutional presence in the United States, I find that because of the ability to transfer funds or other assets instantaneously, prior notice to such persons of measures to be taken pursuant to this order would render those measures ineffectual. I therefore determine that for these measures to be effective in addressing the national emergency declared in this order, there need be no prior notice of a listing or determination made pursuant to section 1 of this order.

Sec. 8. The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized to take such actions, including the promulgation of rules and regulations, and to employ all powers granted to the President by IEEPA as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this order. The Secretary of the Treasury may redelegate any of these functions to other officers and agencies of the United States Government consistent with applicable law. All agencies of the United States Government are hereby directed to take all appropriate measures within their authority to carry out the provisions of this order.

Sec. 9. The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Attorney General and the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized to submit the recurring and final reports to the Congress on the national emergency declared in this order, consistent with section 401(c) of the NEA (50 U.S.C. 1641(c)) and section 204(c) of IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 1703(c)).

Sec. 10. This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
April 1, 2015.

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Executive Order — Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade

From White House website:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to maintain Federal leadership in sustainability and greenhouse gas emission reductions, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. Executive departments and agencies (agencies) have been among our Nation’s leaders as the United States works to build a clean energy economy that will sustain our prosperity and the health of our people and our environment for generations to come. Federal leadership in energy, environmental water, fleet, buildings, and acquisition management will continue to drive national greenhouse gas reductions and support preparations for the impacts of climate change. Through a combination of more efficient Federal operations such as those outlined in this Executive Order (order), we have the opportunity to reduce agency direct greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40 percent over the next decade while at the same time fostering innovation, reducing spending, and strengthening the communities in which our Federal facilities operate.

It therefore continues to be the policy of the United States that agencies shall increase efficiency and improve their environmental performance. Improved environmental performance will help us protect our planet for future generations and save taxpayer dollars through avoided energy costs and increased efficiency, while also making Federal facilities more resilient. To improve environmental performance and Federal sustainability, priority should first be placed on reducing energy use and cost, then on finding renewable or alternative energy solutions. Pursuing clean sources of energy will improve energy and water security, while ensuring that Federal facilities will continue to meet mission requirements and lead by example. Employing this strategy for the next decade calls for expanded and updated Federal environmental performance goals with a clear overarching objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions across Federal operations and the Federal supply chain.

Sec. 2. Agency Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the head of each agency shall, within 90 days of the date of this order, propose to the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) percentage reduction targets for agency-wide reductions of scope 1 and 2 and scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions in absolute terms by the end of fiscal year 2025 relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline. Where appropriate, the target shall exclude direct emissions from excluded vehicles and equipment and from electric power produced and sold commercially to other parties as the primary business of the agency. The proposed targets shall be subject to the review and approval of the Chair of CEQ in coordination with the Director of OMB under section 4(b) of this order.

Sec. 3. Sustainability Goals for Agencies. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order and to achieve the goals of section 2 of this order, the head of each agency shall, where life-cycle cost-effective, beginning in fiscal year 2016, unless otherwise specified:

(a) promote building energy conservation, efficiency, and management by:

(i) reducing agency building energy intensity measured in British thermal units per gross square foot by 2.5 percent annually through the end of fiscal year 2025, relative to the baseline of the agency’s building energy use in fiscal year 2015 and taking into account agency progress to date, except where revised pursuant to section 9(f) of this order, by implementing efficiency measures based on and using practices such as:

(A) using remote building energy performance assessment auditing technology;

(B) participating in demand management programs;

(C) ensuring that monthly performance data is entered into the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager for covered buildings;

(D) incorporating, where feasible, the consensus-based, industry standard Green Button data access system into reporting, data analytics, and automation processes;

(E) implementing space utilization and optimization practices and policies;

(F) identifying opportunities to transition test-bed technologies to achieve the goals of this section; and

(G) conforming, where feasible, to city energy performance benchmarking and reporting requirements; and

(ii) improving data center energy efficiency at agency facilities by:

(A) ensuring the agency chief information officer promotes data center energy optimization, efficiency, and performance;

(B) installing and monitoring advanced energy meters in all data centers by fiscal year 2018; and

(C) establishing a power usage effectiveness target of 1.2 to 1.4 for new data centers and less than 1.5 for existing data centers;

(b) ensure that at a minimum, the following percentage of the total amount of building electric energy and thermal energy shall be clean energy, accounted for by renewable electric energy and alternative energy:

(i) not less than 10 percent in fiscal years 2016 and 2017;

(ii) not less than 13 percent in fiscal years 2018 and 2019;

(iii) not less than 16 percent in fiscal years 2020 and 2021;

(iv) not less than 20 percent in fiscal years 2022 and 2023; and

(v) not less than 25 percent by fiscal year 2025 and each year thereafter;

(c) ensure that the percentage of the total amount of building electric energy consumed by the agency that is renewable electric energy is:

(i) not less than 10 percent in fiscal years 2016 and 2017;

(ii) not less than 15 percent in fiscal years 2018 and 2019;

(iii) not less than 20 percent in fiscal years 2020 and 2021;

(iv) not less than 25 percent in fiscal years 2022 and 2023; and

(v) not less than 30 percent by fiscal year 2025 and each year thereafter;

(d) include in the renewable electric energy portion of the clean energy target established in subsection (b) of this section renewable electric energy as defined in section 19(v) of this order and associated with the following actions, which are listed in order of priority:

(i) installing agency-funded renewable energy on site at Federal facilities and retaining corresponding renewable energy certificates (RECs) or obtaining equal value replacement RECs;

(ii) contracting for the purchase of energy that includes the installation of renewable energy on site at a Federal facility or off site from a Federal facility and the retention of corresponding RECs or obtaining equal value replacement RECs for the term of the contract;

(iii) purchasing electricity and corresponding RECs or obtaining equal value replacement RECs; and

(iv) purchasing RECs;

(e) include in the alternative energy portion of the clean energy target established in subsection (b) of this section alternative energy as defined in section 19(c) of this order and associated with the following actions, where feasible:

(i) installing thermal renewable energy on site at Federal facilities and retaining corresponding renewable attributes or obtaining equal value replacement RECs where applicable;

(ii) installing combined heat and power processes on site at Federal facilities;

(iii) installing fuel cell energy systems on site at Federal facilities;

(iv) utilizing energy from new small modular nuclear reactor technologies;

(v) utilizing energy from a new project that includes the active capture and storage of carbon dioxide emissions associated with energy generation;

(vi) implementing other alternative energy approaches that advance the policy set forth in section 1 and achieve the goals of section 2 of this order and are in accord with any sustainability, environmental performance, and other instructions or guidance established pursuant to sections 4(e) and 5(a) of this order; and

(vii) including in the Department of Defense (DOD) accounting for alternative energy for this subsection, fulfillment of the requirements for DOD goals established under section 2852 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 as amended by section 2842 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010;

(f) improve agency water use efficiency and management, including stormwater management by:

(i) reducing agency potable water consumption intensity measured in gallons per gross square foot by 36 percent by fiscal year 2025 through reductions of 2 percent annually through fiscal year 2025 relative to a baseline of the agency’s water consumption in fiscal year 2007;

(ii) installing water meters and collecting and utilizing building and facility water balance data to improve water conservation and management;

(iii) reducing agency industrial, landscaping, and agricultural (ILA) water consumption measured in gallons by 2 percent annually through fiscal year 2025 relative to a baseline of the agency’s ILA water consumption in fiscal year 2010; and

(iv) installing appropriate green infrastructure features on federally owned property to help with stormwater and wastewater management;

(g) if the agency operates a fleet of at least 20 motor vehicles, improve agency fleet and vehicle efficiency and management by:

(i) determining, as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, the optimum fleet inventory with emphasis placed on eliminating unnecessary or non-essential vehicles from the agency’s fleet inventory;

(ii) taking actions that reduce fleet-wide per-mile greenhouse gas emissions from agency fleet vehicles, relative to a baseline of emissions in fiscal year 2014, to achieve the following percentage reductions:

(A) not less than 4 percent by the end of fiscal year 2017;

(B) not less than 15 percent by the end of fiscal year 2021; and

(C) not less than 30 percent by the end of fiscal year 2025;

(iii) collecting and utilizing as a fleet efficiency management tool, as soon as practicable but not later than 2 years after the date of this order, agency fleet operational data through deployment of vehicle telematics at a vehicle asset level for all new passenger and light duty vehicle acquisitions and for medium duty vehicles where appropriate;

(iv) ensuring that agency annual asset-level fleet data is properly and accurately accounted for in a formal agency Fleet Management System and any relevant data is submitted to the Federal Automotive Statistical Tool reporting database, the Federal Motor Vehicle Registration System, and the Fleet Sustainability Dashboard (FleetDASH) system;

(v) planning for agency fleet composition such that by December 31, 2020, zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid vehicles account for 20 percent of all new agency passenger vehicle acquisitions and by December 31, 2025, zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid vehicles account for 50 percent of all new agency passenger vehicles and including, where practicable, acquisition of such vehicles in other vehicle classes and counting double credit towards the targets in this section for such acquisitions; and

(vi) planning for appropriate charging or refueling infrastructure or other power storage technologies for zero emission vehicles or plug-in hybrid vehicles and opportunities for ancillary services to support vehicle-to-grid technology;

(h) improve building efficiency, performance, and management by:

(i) ensuring, beginning in fiscal year 2020 and thereafter, that all new construction of Federal buildings greater than 5,000 gross square feet that enters the planning process is designed to achieve energy net-zero and, where feasible, water or waste net-zero by fiscal year 2030;

(ii) identifying, beginning in June of 2016, as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, a percentage of at least 15 percent, by number or total square footage, of the agency’s existing buildings above 5,000 gross square feet that will, by fiscal year 2025, comply with the revised Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings (Guiding Principles), developed pursuant to section 4 of this order, and making annual progress toward 100 percent conformance with the Guiding Principles for its building inventory;

(iii) identifying, as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, a percentage of the agency’s existing buildings above 5,000 gross square feet intended to be energy, waste, or water net-zero buildings by fiscal year 2025 and implementing actions that will allow those buildings to meet that target;

(iv) including in all new agency lease solicitations over 10,000 rentable square feet:

(A) criteria for energy efficiency either as a required performance specification or as a source selection evaluation factor in best-value tradeoff procurements; and

(B) requirements for building lessor disclosure of carbon emission or energy consumption data for that portion of the building occupied by the agency that may be provided by the lessor through submetering or estimation from pro-rated occupancy data, whichever is more cost-effective;

(v) reporting building energy, beginning in fiscal year 2016 as part of the agency scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions for newly solicited leases over 10,000 rentable square feet;

(vi) including in the planning for new buildings or leases cost-effective strategies to optimize sustainable space usage and consideration of existing community transportation planning and infrastructure, including access to public transit;

(vii) ensuring that all new construction, major renovation, repair, and alteration of agency buildings includes appropriate design and deployment of fleet charging infrastructure; and

(viii) including the incorporation of climate-resilient design and management elements into the operation, repair, and renovation of existing agency buildings and the design of new agency buildings;

(i) promote sustainable acquisition and procurement by ensuring that each of the following environmental performance and sustainability factors are included to the maximum extent practicable for all applicable procurements in the planning, award, and execution phases of the acquisition by:

(i) meeting statutory mandates that require purchase preference for:

(A) recycled content products designated by EPA;

(B) energy and water efficient products and services, such as ENERGY STAR qualified and Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)-designated products, identified by EPA and the Department of Energy (DOE); and

(C) BioPreferred and biobased designated products designated by the United States Department of Agriculture;

(ii) purchasing sustainable products and services identified by EPA programs including:

(A) Significant New Alternative Policy (SNAP) chemicals or other alternatives to ozone-depleting substances and high global warming potential hydrofluorocarbons, where feasible, as identified by SNAP;

(B) WaterSense certified products and services (water efficient products);

(C) Safer Choice labeled products (chemically intensive products that contain safer ingredients); and

(D) SmartWay Transport partners and SmartWay products (fuel efficient products and services);

(iii) purchasing environmentally preferable products or services that:

(A) meet or exceed specifications, standards, or labels recommended by EPA that have been determined to assist agencies in meeting their needs and further advance sustainable procurement goals of this order; or

(B) meet environmental performance criteria developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies consistent with section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) and OMB Circular A-119;

(iv) acting, as part of the implementation of planning requirements of section 14 of this order, until an agency achieves at least 95 percent compliance with the BioPreferred and biobased purchasing requirement in paragraph (i) of this subsection, to:

(A) establish an annual target for the number of contracts to be awarded with BioPreferred and biobased criteria and dollar value of BioPreferred and biobased products to be delivered and reported under those contracts in the following fiscal year. To establish this target, agencies shall consider the dollar value of designated BioPreferred and biobased products reported in previous years, the specifications reviewed and revised for inclusion of BioPreferred and biobased products, and the number of applicable product and service contracts to be awarded, including construction, operations and maintenance, food services, vehicle maintenance, and janitorial services; and

(B) ensure contractors submit timely annual reports of their BioPreferred and biobased purchases; and

(v) reducing copier and printing paper use and acquiring uncoated printing and writing paper containing at least 30 percent postconsumer recycled content or higher as designated by future instruction under section 4(e) of this order;

(j) advance waste prevention and pollution prevention by:

(i) reporting in accordance with the requirements of sections 301 through 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (42 U.S.C. 11001 through 11023);

(ii) diverting at least 50 percent of non-hazardous solid waste, including food and compostable material but not construction and demolition materials and debris, annually, and pursuing opportunities for net-zero waste or additional diversion opportunities;

(iii) diverting at least 50 percent of non-hazardous construction and demolition materials and debris; and

(iv) reducing or minimizing the quantity of toxic and hazardous chemicals and materials acquired, used, or disposed of, particularly where such reduction will assist the agency in pursuing agency greenhouse gas emission reduction targets established in section 2 of this order;

(k) implement performance contracts for Federal buildings by:

(i) utilizing performance contracting as an important tool to help meet identified energy efficiency and management goals while deploying life-cycle cost-effective energy efficiency and clean energy technology and water conservation measures;

(ii) fulfilling existing agency performance contracting commitments towards the goal of $4 billion in Federal performance-based contracts by the end of calendar year 2016; and

(iii) providing annual agency targets for performance contracting for energy savings to be implemented in fiscal year 2017 and annually thereafter as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order;

(l) promote electronics stewardship by establishing, measuring, and reporting by:

(i) ensuring procurement preference for environmentally sustainable electronic products as established in subsection (i) of this section;

(ii) establishing and implementing policies to enable power management, duplex printing, and other energy-efficient or environmentally sustainable features on all eligible agency electronic products; and

(iii) employing environmentally sound practices with respect to the agency’s disposition of all agency excess or surplus electronic products.

Sec. 4. Duties of the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the Chair of CEQ shall:

(a) in coordination with the Director of OMB, establish a Federal Interagency Sustainability Steering Committee (Steering Committee) that shall advise the Director of OMB and the Chair of CEQ on the performance of agency responsibilities under sections 2 and 3 of this order and shall include the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer referenced in section 6 of this order and agency Chief Sustainability Officers designated under sections 7 and 8 of this order;

(b) in coordination with the Director of OMB review and approve agency-wide scope 1 and 2 and scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets developed under section 2 of this order;

(c) in coordination with the Director of OMB, prepare streamlined reporting metrics to determine each agency’s progress under sections 2 and 3 of this order;

(d) review and evaluate each agency’s Plan prepared under section 14 of this order;

(e) within 45 days of the date of this order and thereafter as necessary, after consultation with the Director of OMB, issue implementing instructions or other guidance to direct agency implementation of this order, other than instructions within the authority of the Director of OMB to issue under section 5 of this order;

(f) within 150 days of the date of this order, prepare and issue revised Guiding Principles for both new and existing Federal buildings including consideration of climate change resilience and employee and visitor wellness;

(g) revise, as necessary and in coordination with the Director of OMB, existing CEQ guidance and implementing instructions on Sustainable Locations for Federal Facilities of September 15, 2011, Sustainable Practices for Designed Landscapes of October 31, 2011, as supplemented on October 22, 2014, Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance [Revision 1] of June 4, 2012, and Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514 of July 10, 2013;

(h) within 150 days of the date of this order, prepare and issue guidance to assist agencies in the implementation of section 13 of this order;

(i) identify annually, based on total contract spending in the previous fiscal year as reported in the Federal Procurement Data System, the seven largest Federal procuring agencies responsible for implementation of section 15(b) of this order;

(j) administer a Presidential leadership award program to recognize exceptional and outstanding performance and excellence in agency efforts to implement this order; and

(k) establish and disband, as appropriate, temporary interagency working groups to provide recommendations to the Chair of CEQ associated with the goals of this order, including: grid-based green power; data quality, collection, and reporting; greenhouse gas emissions associated with the transportation of Federal freight and cargo; sustainability considerations in resilience planning; agency supply chain climate vulnerability; recycled content paper; green infrastructure; and carbon uptake accounting and wood products.

Sec. 5. Duties of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the Director of OMB shall:

(a) issue, after consultation with the Chair of CEQ, instructions to the heads of agencies concerning periodic performance evaluation of agency implementation of this order, including consideration of the results from section 4(c) of this order;

(b) prepare scorecards providing periodic evaluation of Principal Agency performance in implementing this order and publish scorecard results on a publicly available website; and

(c) review and approve each agency’s Plan prepared under section 14 of this order.

Sec. 6. Duties of the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer. Henceforth, the Federal Environmental Executive is reestablished as the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer and the Office of the Federal Environmental Executive is reestablished as the Office of the Chief Sustainability Officer, for which the Environmental Protection Agency shall provide funding and administrative support and that shall be maintained at CEQ. In implementing the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer shall:

(a) monitor progress and advise the Chair of CEQ on agency goals in sections 2 and 3 of this order;

(b) chair, convene, and preside at quarterly meetings; determine the agenda; and direct the work of the Steering Committee;

(c) lead the development of programs and policies to assist agencies in implementing the goals of this order in coordination with DOE, EPA, the General Services Administration (GSA), and other agencies as appropriate;

(d) coordinate and provide direction to relevant existing workgroups through quarterly meetings to ensure that opportunities for improvement in implementation of this order are identified and addressed; and

(e) advise the Chair of CEQ on the implementation of this order.

Sec. 7. Duties of Principal Agencies. To ensure successful implementation of the policy established in section 1 of this order, the head of each Principal Agency shall:

(a) designate, within 45 days of the date of this order, an agency Chief Sustainability Officer, who shall be a senior civilian officer of the United States, compensated annually in an amount at or above the amount payable at level IV of the Executive Schedule, and report such designation to the Director of OMB and the Chair of CEQ;

(b) assign the designated official the authority to represent the agency on the Steering Committee established under section 4 of this order and perform such other duties relating to the implementation of this order within the agency as the head of the agency deems appropriate;

(c) prepare and distribute internally, where appropriate, performance evaluations of agency implementation of this order that reflect the contribution of agency services, components, bureaus, and operating divisions to the goals of this order;

(d) ensure, as soon as practicable after the date of this order, that leases and contracts entered into after the date of this order for lessor or contractor operation of Government-owned buildings or vehicles facilitate the agency’s compliance with this order;

(e) implement opportunities to improve agency fleet sustainability, including vehicle acquisitions as established in section 3(g) of this order, waiver authority, and fleet data management practices, by revising agency fleet management review and approval procedures to include the Chief Sustainability Officers designated under this section and section 8 of this order;

(f) consider the development of policies to promote sustainable commuting and work-related travel practices for Federal employees that foster workplace vehicle charging, encourage telecommuting, teleconferencing, and reward carpooling and the use of public transportation, where consistent with agency authority and Federal appropriations law;

(g) ensure regional agency actions consider and are consistent with, sustainability and climate preparedness priorities of States, local governments, and tribal communities where agency facilities are located;

(h) foster outstanding performance and excellence in agency efforts to implement this order through opportunities such as agency leadership award programs;

(i) continue implementation of formal Environmental Management Systems (EMS) where those systems have proven effective and deploy new EMSs where appropriate; and

(j) notwithstanding the limitations on implementation in section 17 of this order, apply, where feasible and appropriate, the strategies and plans to achieve the goals of this order in whole or in part with respect to fueling, operation, and management of tactical or emergency vehicles and to the activities and facilities of the agency that are not located within the United States.

Sec. 8. Duties of Contributing Agencies. Within 45 days of the date of this order, to ensure successful implementation of the policy established in section 1 of this order, the head of each contributing agency shall designate an agency Chief Sustainability Officer, who shall be a senior civilian officer of the United States, compensated annually in an amount at or above the amount payable at level IV of the Executive Schedule, and report such designation to the Director of OMB and the Chair of CEQ.

Sec. 9. Duties of the Agency Chief Sustainability Officers. The Chief Sustainability Officers designated under sections 7 and 8 of this order shall be responsible for:

(a) ensuring agency policies, plans, and strategies implemented to achieve the goals of this order consider the role of agency regional facilities and personnel and are integrated into agency permitting and environmental review policies, programs, and planning;

(b) developing and implementing an agency-wide strategic process that coordinates appropriate agency functions and programs to ensure that those functions and programs consider and address the goals of this order;

(c) reporting annually to the Chair of CEQ and Director of OMB a comprehensive inventory of progress towards the greenhouse gas emissions goals established in section 2 of this order;

(d) representing the agency on the Steering Committee;

(e) convening quarterly meetings of agency bureaus, commands, or operating divisions that are responsible for the implementation of strategies necessary to meet the goals of this order;

(f) representing the agency in any requests to the Chair of CEQ and Director of OMB to amend or normalize a baseline for goals established in this order due to change of greater than 5 percent as a result of agency space consolidation, a change in mission tempo, or improved data quality;

(g) providing plans, including the Plan prepared under section 14 of this order, reports, information, and assistance necessary to implement this order, to the Director of OMB, the Chair of CEQ, and the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer; and

(h) performing such other duties relating to the implementation of this order as the head of the agency deems appropriate.

Sec. 10. Regional Coordination. Within 180 days of the date of this order, each EPA and GSA Regional office shall in coordination with Federal Executive Boards established by the Presidential Memorandum of November 10, 1961 (The Need for Greater Coordination of Regional and Field Activities of the Government), DOD and other agencies as appropriate, convene regional interagency workgroups to identify and address:

(a) sustainable operations of Federal fleet vehicles, including identification and implementation of opportunities to use and share fueling infrastructure and logistical resources to support the adoption and use of alternative fuel vehicles, including E-85 compatible vehicles, zero emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles, and compressed natural gas powered vehicles;

(b) water resource management and drought response opportunities;

(c) climate change preparedness and resilience planning in coordination with State, local, and tribal communities; and

(d) opportunities for collective procurement of clean energy to satisfy energy demand for multiple agency buildings.

Sec. 11. Employee Education and Training. Within 180 days of the date of this order, the Office of Personnel Management, in coordination with DOE, GSA, EPA, and other agencies as appropriate, shall:

(a) consider the establishment of a dedicated Federal occupational series for sustainability professionals and relevant positions that directly impact the achievement of Federal sustainability goals and if appropriate, prepare and issue such occupational series; and

(b) initiate the inclusion of environmental sustainability and climate preparedness and resilience into Federal leadership and educational programs in courses and training, delivered through electronic learning, in classroom settings, and residential centers, particularly developmental training for Senior Executive Service and GS-15 personnel.

Sec. 12. Supporting the Federal Fleet. (a) GSA shall ensure that vehicles available to agencies for either lease or sale, at or below market cost, through its vehicle program include adequate variety and volume of alternative fuel vehicles, including zero emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles, to meet the fleet management goals of this order.

(b) DOE shall assist the United States Postal Service (USPS) in evaluating the best alternative and advanced fuel technologies for the USPS fleet and report on such progress annually as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order.

Sec. 13. Supporting Federal Facility Climate Preparedness and Resilience. The head of each agency shall, consistent with Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013, ensure that agency operations and facilities prepare for impacts of climate change as part of the planning requirements of section 14 of this order and consistent with planning required under section 5 of Executive Order 13653 by:

(a) identifying and addressing projected impacts of climate change on mission critical water, energy, communication, and transportation demands and considering those climate impacts in operational preparedness planning for major agency facilities and operations; and

(b) calculating the potential cost and risk to mission associated with agency operations that do not take into account the information collected in subsection (a) of this section and considering that cost in agency decision-making.

Sec. 14. Agency Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Beginning in June 2015, and continuing through fiscal year 2025, the head of each Principal Agency shall develop, implement, and annually update an integrated Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (Plan) based on guidance prepared by the Chair of CEQ under section 4 of this order. Contributing agencies are encouraged to prepare a Plan but may limit content of the Plan to a summary of agency actions to meet the requirements of this order. Each Principal Agency Plan and update shall be provided to the Chair of CEQ and Director of OMB, shall be subject to approval by the Director under section 5 of this order, and shall be made publicly available on an agency website once approved.

Sec. 15. Supply Chain Greenhouse Gas Management. In implementing the greenhouse gas management policies in section 1 of this order and to better understand and manage the implications of Federal supply chain greenhouse gas emissions:

(a) the Chair of CEQ shall, within 30 days of the date of this order and annually thereafter, identify and publicly release an inventory of major Federal suppliers using publicly available Federal procurement information, including information as to whether the supplier has accounted for and publicly disclosed, during the previous calendar year, annual scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emission data and publicly disclosed a greenhouse gas emission reductions target (or targets) for 2015 or beyond; and

(b) the seven largest Federal procuring agencies shall each submit for consideration, in conjunction with the planning requirements of section 14 of this order, a plan to implement at least five new procurements annually in which the agency may include, as appropriate, contract requirements for vendors or evaluation criteria that consider contractor emissions and greenhouse gas emissions management practices. The plans submitted for consideration may include identification of evaluation criteria, performance period criteria, and contract clauses that will encourage suppliers to manage and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and shall be implemented as soon as practicable after any relevant administrative requirements have been met.

Sec. 16. Revocations and Conforming Provisions. (a) Pursuant to section 742(b) of Public Law 111-117, I have determined that this order will achieve equal or better environmental or energy efficiency results than Executive Order 13423. Therefore, Executive Order 13423 of January 24, 2007, is revoked.

(b) Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009; Presidential Memorandum of December 2, 2011 (Implementation of Energy Savings Projects and Performance-Based Contracting for Energy Savings); section 1 of Presidential Memorandum of February 21, 2012 (Driving Innovation and Creating Jobs in Rural America through Biobased and Sustainable Product Procurement); and Presidential Memorandum of December 5, 2013 (Federal Leadership on Energy Management), are revoked.

(c) Presidential Memorandum of May 24, 2011 (Federal Fleet Performance), is revoked as of October 1, 2015.

(d) Section 3(b)(vi) of Executive Order 13327 of February 4, 2004, is amended by striking “Executive Order 13148 of April 21, 2000” and inserting in lieu thereof “other Executive Orders”.

(e) Section 2(d) of Executive Order 13432 of May 14, 2007, is amended to read as follows: “‘greenhouse gases’ means carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, nitrogen triflouride, and sulfur hexafluoride;”.

(f) Section 5 of Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013, is amended by striking “Executive Order 13514” and inserting in lieu thereof “other Executive Orders”.

(g) Section 1 of Executive Order 13677 of September 23, 2014, is amended by striking “Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009 (Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance), and Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013 (Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change),” and inserting in lieu thereof “Several Executive Orders have”.

Sec. 17. Limitations. (a) This order shall apply to an agency with respect to the activities, personnel, resources, and facilities of the agency that are located within the United States. The head of an agency may provide that this order shall apply in whole or in part with respect to the activities, personnel, resources, and facilities of the agency that are not located within the United States, if the head of the agency determines that such application is in the interest of the United States.

(b) The head of an agency shall manage activities, personnel, resources, and facilities of the agency that are not located within the United States with respect to which the head of the agency has not made a determination under subsection (a) of this section in a manner consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this order to the extent the head of the agency determines practicable.

Sec. 18. Exemption Authority. (a) The Director of National Intelligence may exempt an intelligence activity of the United States, and related personnel, resources, and facilities, from the provisions of this order other than this subsection to the extent the Director determines necessary to protect intelligence sources and methods from unauthorized disclosure.

(b) The head of an agency may exempt law enforcement activities of that agency, and related personnel, resources, and facilities, from the provisions of this order other than this subsection to the extent the head of an agency determines necessary to protect undercover operations from unauthorized disclosure.

(c) The head of an agency may exempt law enforcement, protective, emergency response, or military tactical vehicle fleets of that agency from the provisions of this order other than this subsection. Heads of agencies shall manage fleets to which this paragraph refers in a manner consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this order to the extent they determine practicable.

(d) The head of an agency may exempt particular agency activities and facilities from the provisions of this order other than this subsection where it is in the interest of national security. If the head of an agency issues an exemption under this section, the agency must notify the Chair of CEQ in writing within 30 days of issuance of the exemption under this subsection. To the maximum extent practicable, and without compromising national security, each agency shall strive to comply with the purposes, goals, and implementation steps in this order.

(e) The head of an agency may submit to the President, through the Chair of CEQ, a request for an exemption of an agency activity, and related personnel, resources, and facilities, from this order.

Sec. 19. Definitions. As used in this order:

(a) “absolute greenhouse gas emissions” means total greenhouse gas emissions without normalization for activity levels and includes any allowable consideration of sequestration;

(b) “agency” means an executive agency as defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code, excluding the Government Accountability Office;

(c) “alternative energy” means energy generated from technologies and approaches that advance renewable heat sources, including biomass, solar thermal, geothermal, waste heat, and renewable combined heat and power processes; combined heat and power; small modular nuclear reactor technologies; fuel cell energy systems; and energy generation, where active capture and storage of carbon dioxide emissions associated with that energy generation is verified;

(d) “alternative fuel vehicle” means vehicles defined by section 301 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, as amended (42 U.S.C. 13211), and otherwise includes electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, dedicated alternative fuel vehicles, dual fueled alternative fuel vehicles, qualified fuel cell motor vehicles, advanced lean burn technology motor vehicles, low greenhouse gas vehicles, compressed natural gas powered vehicles, self-propelled vehicles such as bicycles, and any other alternative fuel vehicles that are defined by statute;

(e) “clean energy” means renewable electric energy and alternative energy;

(f) “climate resilient design” means to design assets to prepare for, withstand, respond to, or quickly recover from disruptions due to severe weather events and climate change for the intended life of the asset;

(g) “construction and demolition materials and debris” means waste materials and debris generated during construction, renovation, demolition, or dismantling of all structures and buildings and associated infrastructure;

(h) “Contributing Agencies” are defined as executive agencies that are not subject to the Chief Financial Officers Act and include Federal Boards, Commissions, and Committees;

(i) “divert” or “diverting” means redirecting materials from disposal in landfills or incinerators to recycling or recovery, excluding diversion to waste-to-energy facilities;

(j) “environmentally preferable” means products or services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with competing products or services that serve the same purpose. This comparison may consider raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, use, operation, maintenance, or disposal related to the product or service;

(k) “excluded vehicles and equipment” means any vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or non-road equipment owned or operated by an agency of the Federal Government that is used in combat support, combat service support, tactical or relief operations, or training for such operations or spaceflight vehicles (including associated ground-support equipment);

(l) “Federal facility” means any building or collection of buildings, grounds, or structures, as well as any fixture or part thereof, which is owned by the United States or any Federal agency or that is held by the United States or any Federal agency under a lease-acquisition agreement under which the United States or a Federal agency will receive fee simple title under the terms of such agreement without further negotiation;

(m) “greenhouse gases” means carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, nitrogen triflouride, and sulfur hexafluoride;

(n) “life-cycle cost-effective” means the life-cycle costs of a product, project, or measure are estimated to be equal to or less than the base case (i.e., current or standard practice or product);

(o) “net-zero energy building” means a building that is designed, constructed, or renovated and operated such that the actual annual source energy consumption is balanced by on-site renewable energy;

(p) “net-zero water building” means a building that is designed, constructed, or renovated and operated to greatly reduce total water consumption, use non-potable sources as much as possible, and recycle and reuse water in order to return the equivalent amount of water as was withdrawn from all sources, including municipal supply, without compromising groundwater and surface water quantity or quality;

(q) “net-zero waste building” means a building that is operated to reduce, reuse, recycle, compost, or recover solid waste streams (with the exception of hazardous and medical waste) thereby resulting in zero waste disposal;

(r) “passenger vehicle” means a sedan or station wagon designed primarily to transport people as defined in 102-34.35 of the Federal Management Regulation;

(s) “power usage effectiveness” means the ratio obtained by dividing the total amount of electricity and other power consumed in running a data center by the power consumed by the information and communications technology in the data center;

(t) “Principal Agencies” mean agencies subject to the Chief Financial Officers Act and agencies subject to the OMB Scorecard process under section 5(b) of this order;

(u) “renewable energy certificate” means the technology and environmental (non-energy) attributes that represent proof that 1 megawatt-hour (MWh) of electricity was generated from an eligible renewable energy resource, that can be sold separately from the underlying generic electricity with which they are associated, and that, for the purposes of section 3(d)(iii) and (iv) of this order, were produced by sources of renewable energy placed into service within 10 years prior to the start of the fiscal year;

(v) “renewable electric energy” means energy produced by solar, wind, biomass, landfill gas, ocean (including tidal, wave, current, and thermal), geothermal, geothermal heat pumps, microturbines, municipal solid waste, or new hydroelectric generation capacity achieved from increased efficiency or additions of new capacity at an existing hydroelectric project;

(w) “resilience” means the ability to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to changing conditions and withstand, respond to, and recover rapidly from disruptions;

(x) “scope 1, 2, and 3” mean:

(i) scope 1: direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the agency;

(ii) scope 2: direct greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the generation of electricity, heat, or steam purchased by an agency;

(iii) scope 3: greenhouse gas emissions from sources not owned or directly controlled by an agency but related to agency activities such as vendor supply chains, delivery and transportation services, and employee travel and commuting;

(y) “United States” means the fifty States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands, and associated territorial waters and airspace;

(z) “water balance” means a comparison of the water supplied to a defined system to the water consumed by that system in order to identify the proportion of water consumed for specific end-uses and ensure potential water leaks in the system are addressed; and

(aa) “zero emission vehicle” means a vehicle that produces zero exhaust emissions of any criteria pollutant (or precursor pollutant) or greenhouse gas under any possible operational modes or conditions.

Sec. 20. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented in a manner consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

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Despot Obama Will Save the Arctic by Executive Order

Below is a copy of President Obama’s Executive Order that he believes will save the Arctic because it has “warmed twice as rapidly as the reset of the United States.” Salvete Obama!

EXECUTIVE ORDER

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ENHANCING COORDINATION OF NATIONAL EFFORTS IN THE ARCTIC

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and to prepare the Nation for a changing Arctic and enhance coordination of national efforts in the Arctic, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. The Arctic has critical long-term strategic, ecological, cultural, and economic value, and it is imperative that we continue to protect our national interests in the region, which include: national defense; sovereign rights and responsibilities; maritime safety; energy and economic benefits; environmental stewardship; promotion of science and research; and preservation of the rights, freedoms, and uses of the sea as reflected in international law.

Over the past 60 years, climate change has caused the Alaskan Arctic to warm twice as rapidly as the rest of the United States, and will continue to transform the Arctic as its consequences grow more severe. Over the past several decades, higher atmospheric temperatures have led to a steady and dramatic reduction in Arctic sea ice, widespread glacier retreat, increasing coastal erosion, more acidic oceans, earlier spring snowmelt, thawing permafrost, drier landscapes, and more extensive insect outbreaks and wildfires, thus changing the accessibility and natural features of this remote region. As a global leader, the United States has the responsibility to strengthen international cooperation to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions driving climate change, understand more fully and manage more effectively the adverse effects of climate change, protect life and property, develop and manage resources responsibly, enhance the quality of life of Arctic inhabitants, and serve as stewards for valuable and vulnerable ecosystems. In doing so, we must rely on science-based decisionmaking and respect the value and utility of the traditional knowledge of Alaska Native peoples. As the United States assumes the Chairmanship of the Arctic Council, it is more important than ever that we have a coordinated national effort that takes advantage of our combined expertise and efforts in the Arctic region to promote our shared values and priorities.

As the Arctic has changed, the number of Federal working groups created to address the growing strategic importance and accessibility of this critical region has increased. Although these groups have made significant progress and achieved important milestones, managing the broad range of interagency activity in the Arctic requires coordinated planning by the Federal Government, with input by partners and stakeholders, to facilitate Federal, State, local, and Alaska Native tribal government and similar Alaska Native organization, as well as private and nonprofit sector, efforts in the Arctic.

Sec. 2. Arctic Executive Steering Committee. (a) Establishment. There is established an Arctic Executive Steering Committee (Steering Committee), which shall provide guidance to executive departments and agencies (agencies) and enhance coordination of Federal Arctic policies across agencies and offices, and, where applicable, with State, local, and Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations, academic and research institutions, and the private and nonprofit sectors.

(b) Membership. The Steering Committee shall consist of:

(i) the heads, or their designees, of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Council on Environmental Quality, the Domestic Policy Council, and the National Security Council;

(ii) the Executive Officer of the Steering Committee, who shall be designated by the Chair of the Steering Committee (Chair); and

(iii) the Deputy Secretary or equivalent officer from the Departments of State, Defense, Justice, the Interior, Agriculture, Commerce, Labor, Health and Human Services, Transportation, Energy, and Homeland Security; the Office of the Director of National Intelligence; the Environmental Protection Agency; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; the National Science Foundation; the Arctic Research Commission; and the Office of Management and Budget; the Assistant to the President for Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs, or his or her designee; and other agencies or offices as determined appropriate by the Chair.

(c) Administration.

(i) The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, or his or her designee, shall be the Chair of the Executive Steering Committee. The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, or his or her designee, shall be the Vice Chair. Under the leadership of the Chair, the Steering Committee will meet quarterly, or as appropriate, to shape priorities, establish strategic direction, oversee implementation, and ensure coordination of Federal activities in the Arctic.

(ii) The Steering Committee shall coordinate with existing working groups established by Executive Order or statute.

(iii) As appropriate, the Chair of the Steering Committee may establish subcommittees and working groups, consisting of representatives from relevant agencies, to focus on specific key issues and assist in carrying out its responsibilities.

(iv) Agencies shall provide administrative support and additional resources, as appropriate, to support their participation in the Steering Committee to the extent permitted by law and within existing appropriations. Each agency shall bear its own expenses for supporting its participation in the Steering Committee and associated working groups.

(v) Each member of the Steering Committee shall provide the Executive Officer with a single point of contact for coordinating efforts with interagency partners, collaborating with State, local, and Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations, and assisting in carrying out the functions and duties assigned by the Steering Committee.

Sec. 3. Responsibilities of the Arctic Executive Steering Committee. The Steering Committee, in coordination with the heads of relevant agencies and under the direction of the Chair, shall:

(a) provide guidance and coordinate efforts to implement the priorities, objectives, activities, and responsibilities identified in National Security Presidential Directive 66/Homeland Security Presidential Directive 25, Arctic Region Policy, the National Strategy for the Arctic Region and its Implementation Plan, and related agency plans;

(b) provide guidance on prioritizing Federal activities, consistent with agency authorities, while the United States is Chair of the Arctic Council, including, where appropriate, recommendations for resources to use in carrying out those activities; and

(c) establish a working group to provide a report to the Steering Committee by May 1, 2015, that:

(i) identifies potential areas of overlap between and within agencies with respect to implementation of Arctic policy and strategic priorities and provides recommendations to increase coordination and reduce any duplication of effort, which may include ways to increase the effectiveness of existing groups; and

(ii) provides recommendations to address any potential gaps in implementation.

Sec. 4. Duties of the Executive Officer. The Executive Officer shall be responsible for facilitating interagency coordination efforts related to implementing the guidance and strategic priorities developed by the Steering Committee. The Executive Officer shall coordinate with the Chair and the Special Advisor on Arctic Science and Policy at the Department of State to provide regular reports to the Steering Committee on agency implementation and planning efforts for the Arctic region.

Sec. 5. Engagement with the State of Alaska, Alaska Native Tribal Governments, as well as other United States Stakeholders. It is in the best interest of the Nation for the Federal Government to maximize transparency and promote collaboration where possible with the State of Alaska, Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations, and local, private-sector, and nonprofit-sector stakeholders. To facilitate consultation and partnerships with the State of Alaska and Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations, the Steering Committee shall:

(a) develop a process to improve coordination and the sharing of information and knowledge among Federal, State, local, and Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations, and private-sector and nonprofit-sector groups on Arctic issues;

(b) establish a process to ensure tribal consultation and collaboration, consistent with my memorandum of November 5, 2009 (Tribal Consultation). This process shall ensure meaningful consultation and collaboration with Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations in the development of Federal policies that have Alaska Native implications, as applicable, and provide feedback and recommendations to the Steering Committee;

(c) identify an appropriate Federal entity to be the point of contact for Arctic matters with the State of Alaska and with Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations to support collaboration and communication; and

(d) invite members of State, local, and Alaska Native tribal governments and similar Alaska Native organizations, and academic and research institutions to consult on issues or participate in discussions, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law.

Sec. 6. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
January 21, 2015.

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Presidential Propagandizing: What is “Climate-Resilience Considerations?”

*Editor’s Note* – In 2013, when Congress removed the ban on government to lie to the American people, it is the following Executive Order considering fraudulent, non scientific, global warming, which epitomizes exactly why the president of the United States needs to lie to the people. The preamble to this Executive Order, along with Section 1, is 100% propaganda. The rest is fiction.

It’s all quite disgusting!

CLIMATE-RESILIENT INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and to safeguard security and economic growth, protect the sustainability and long-term durability of U.S. development work in vulnerable countries, and promote sound decisionmaking and risk management, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. The world must reduce greenhouse gas emissions to prevent the most dangerous consequences of climate change. Even with increased efforts to curb these emissions, we must prepare for and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The adverse impacts of climate change, including sea-level rise, increases in temperatures, more frequent extreme precipitation and heat events, more severe droughts, and increased wildfire activity, along with other impacts of greenhouse gas emissions, such as ocean acidification, threaten to roll back decades of progress in reducing poverty and improving economic growth in vulnerable countries, compromise the effectiveness and resilience of U.S. development assistance, degrade security, and risk intranational and international conflict over resources.

Executive Order 13514 of October 5, 2009 (Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance), and Executive Order 13653 of November 1, 2013 (Preparing the United States for the Impacts of Climate Change), established a strong foundation for coordinated and consistent action to incorporate climate-resilience considerations into policies and procedures throughout the Federal Government. Executive departments and agencies (agencies) with international development programs must now build upon the recent progress made pursuant to these orders by systematically factoring climate-resilience considerations into international development strategies, planning, programming, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities.

This order requires the integration of climate-resilience considerations into all United States international development work to the extent permitted by law. Dedicated U.S. climate-change adaptation funds are critical to managing the risks posed by climate-change impacts in vulnerable countries. Coping with the magnitude of the consequences of accelerating climate change also requires enhanced efforts across the Federal Government’s broader international development work. Consideration of current and future climate-change impacts will improve the resilience of the Federal Government’s broader international development programs, projects, investments, overseas facilities, and related funding decisions. The United States will also promote a similar approach among relevant multilateral entities in which it participates.

By taking these steps and more fully considering current and future climate-change impacts, the United States will foster better decision-making processes and risk-management approaches, ensure the effectiveness of U.S. investments, and assist other countries in integrating climate-resilience considerations into their own development planning and implementation. Collectively, these efforts will help to better optimize broader international development work and lead to enhanced global preparedness for and resilience to climate change.

The international climate-resilience actions required by this order complement efforts by the Federal Government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at home and globally. The more greenhouse gas emissions are reduced, the less need there will be to adapt to the impacts of a changing climate.

Sec. 2. Incorporating Climate Resilience into International Development. (a) Agencies with direct international development programs and investments shall:

(i) incorporate climate-resilience considerations into decisionmaking by:

(A) assessing and evaluating climate-related risks to and vulnerabilities in agency strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, overseas facilities, and related funding decisions, using best-available climate-change data, tools, and information, including those identified or developed pursuant to sections 3 and 4 of this order; and

(B) as appropriate, adjusting strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities, based on such assessments and evaluations;

(ii) collaborate with other agencies to share knowledge, data, tools, information, frameworks, and lessons learned in incorporating climate-resilience considerations into agency strategy, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities;

(iii) work with other countries, as appropriate, to identify climate risks and incorporate climate-resilience considerations into their international development assistance efforts;

(iv) when determining how to use resources, support efforts of vulnerable countries to integrate climate-resilience considerations into national, regional, and sectoral development planning and action; and

(v) monitor progress in integrating and promoting climate-resilient development considerations as required by this subsection.

(b) Agencies that participate in multilateral entities and other agencies with representation in multilateral development entities, including multilateral development banks and United Nations organizations, shall, as appropriate:

(i) work to encourage multilateral entities to:

(A) assess and evaluate climate-related risks to and vulnerabilities in their strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, using best-available climate-change data, tools, and information; and

(B) adjust their strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, as appropriate, based on such assessments and evaluations;

(ii) collaborate with multilateral entities and share with agencies and other stakeholders knowledge, data, tools, information, frameworks, and lessons learned from the multilateral entities in incorporating climate-resilience considerations into strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions;

(iii) encourage multilateral entities to support efforts of vulnerable countries to integrate climate-resilience considerations into national, regional, and sectoral development planning and action; and

(iv) monitor the efforts of multilateral entities in integrating climate-resilient development considerations as encouraged by this order.

Sec. 3. Enhancing Data, Tools, and Information for Climate-Resilient International Development. Agencies with direct international development programs and investments and those that participate in multilateral entities shall work together with science and security agencies and entities, through the Working Group on Climate-Resilient International Development established in section 4 of this order, to identify and develop, as appropriate, data, decision-support tools, and information to allow the screening for and incorporation of considerations of climate-change risks and vulnerabilities, as appropriate, in strategies, plans, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities. In addition, such agencies shall coordinate efforts, including those undertaken pursuant to Executive Order 13653, to deliver information on climate-change impacts and make data, tools, and information available to decisionmakers in other countries, so as to build their capacity as information providers and users. United States participants in relevant multilateral entities shall share this information with the respective multilateral entity, as appropriate.

Sec. 4. Working Group on Climate-Resilient International Development. (a) Establishment. There is established a Working Group on Climate-Resilient International Development (Working Group) of the Council on Climate Preparedness and Resilience (Council) established by Executive Order 13653.

The Secretary of the Treasury and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, or their designees, shall co-chair the Working Group. Agencies with direct international development programs and investments, agencies that participate in multilateral entities, and science and security agencies and entities shall designate a representative from their respective agencies or entities to participate in the Working Group. Representatives from other agencies or entities may participate in the Working Group as determined by the Co-Chairs.

(b) Mission and Function.

(i) The Working Group shall:

(A) develop, for agencies with direct international development programs and investments, guidelines for integrating considerations of climate-change risks and climate resilience into agency strategies, plans, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities;

(B) assess and identify, for agencies with direct international development programs and investments, existing climate-change data, tools, and information, as described in section 3 of this order, to help agencies assess climate risks and make decisions that incorporate climate-resilience considerations, such as through project screening. To the extent the Working Group identifies needs for new data, tools, and information, it shall work with relevant science and security agencies and entities to advance their development, as appropriate;

(C) identify approaches for adjusting strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities, to respond to the findings of climate-risk assessments;

(D) facilitate the exchange of knowledge, data, tools, information, frameworks, and lessons learned in assessing climate risks to and incorporating climate-resilience considerations into strategies, planning, programs, projects, investments, and related funding decisions, including the planning for and management of overseas facilities, of agencies with direct international development programs and investments, including efforts referenced in section 3 of this order;

(E) work through existing channels to share best practices developed by the Working Group with other donor countries and multilateral entities to facilitate advancement of climate-resilient development policies;

(F) promote interagency collaboration, including through joint training; and

(G) develop, for agencies with direct international development programs and investments, methods for tracking and reporting on Federal Government progress in institutionalizing more climate-resilient development approaches, including performance metrics.

(ii) The Co-Chairs of the Council may designate additional Co-Chairs of the Working Group. The Co-Chairs of the Working Group may establish sub-working groups, as appropriate.

Sec. 5. Implementation and Reporting of Progress. (a) Implementation. To promote sustained focus on implementation, both at agency headquarters and in the field, the Working Group shall:

(i) establish a 2-year timeline, divided into 6-month intervals, to implement section 4(b)(i) of this order, setting forth specific goals to be accomplished and milestones to be achieved; and

(ii) analyze, at least annually, the Federal Government’s progress in implementing this order and provide recommendations for priority areas for further implementation to the Council, Office of Management and Budget, National Security Council, Council on Environmental Quality, Office of Science and Technology Policy, and other agencies, offices, and entities, as appropriate.

(b) Reporting.

(i) Agencies with direct international development programs and investments shall report on and track progress in achieving the requirements identified in section 2(a) of this order, including accomplished and planned milestones, through the Federal Agency Planning process set forth in section 5 of Executive Order 13653. Once the Working Group has developed metrics and methodologies as required by section 4(b)(i)(G) of this order, agency reporting shall include an estimation of the proportion of each agency’s direct international development programs and investments for which climate-risk assessments have been conducted, as well as an estimation of the proportion of the programs and investments for which climate risk was identified and acted upon.

(ii) Agencies that participate in multilateral entities shall report on the efforts of multilateral entities in integrating climate-resilient development considerations into their operations through the Federal Agency Planning process set forth in section 5 of Executive Order 13653. Where more than one agency is involved in the U.S. Government’s participation in a multilateral entity, the lead agency for such participation shall be responsible for reporting, in coordination with the other agencies involved.

Sec. 6. Climate-Change Mitigation. As agencies incorporate climate-resilience considerations into international development work, they shall continue seeking opportunities to help international partners promote sustainable low-emissions development. The Federal Government has greatly increased the number and variety of international development initiatives focused on climate-change mitigation, including programs to promote clean energy, energy efficiency, and sustainable land-use and forestry practices, as well as partnerships with more than two dozen countries to formulate and implement sustainable low-emissions development strategies. Within 1 year of the date of this order, and building on the full range of efforts the United States has undertaken to date, the National Security Council shall convene relevant agencies and entities to explore further mitigation opportunities in broader U.S. international development work and develop recommendations for further action.

Sec. 7. Definitions. As used in this order:

(a) “Adaptation” has the meaning provided in section 8(b) of Executive Order 13653: adjustment in natural or human systems in anticipation of or response to a changing environment in a way that effectively uses beneficial opportunities or reduces negative effects;

(b) “Direct international development programs and investments” refers to:

(i) bilateral, regional, and multilateral international development programs and investments over which agencies have primary programmatic and financial management responsibilities; or

(ii) the extension of official financing by agencies bilaterally to private sector investors to support international development;

(c) “Climate-change mitigation” refers to actions that reduce or enhance removals of greenhouse gas emissions;

(d) “Resilience” has the meaning provided in section 8(c) of Executive Order 13653: the ability to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to changing conditions and withstand, respond to, and recover rapidly from disruptions;

(e) “Agencies with direct international development programs and investments” means the Department of State, Department of Agriculture, Department of the Interior, United States Agency for International Development, Millennium Challenge Corporation, Overseas Private Investment Corporation, United States Trade and Development Agency, and other relevant agencies and entities, as determined by the Working Group Co-Chairs;

(f) “Science and security agencies and entities” means the Department of the Interior, Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology Policy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States Global Change Research Program, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, and other relevant agencies and entities, as determined by the Working Group Co-Chairs; and

(g) “Agencies that participate in multilateral entities” means the Department of the Treasury, Department of State, and other relevant agencies and entities, as determined by the Working Group Co-Chairs.

Sec. 8. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law or Executive Order to an executive department, agency, or head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with U.S. obligations under international agreements and applicable U.S. law, and shall be subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
September 23, 2014.

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Executive Order: Mark of the Beast

IMPROVING THE SECURITY OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL TRANSACTIONS

Given that identity crimes, including credit, debit, and other payment card fraud, continue to be a risk to U.S. economic activity, and given the economic consequences of data breaches, the United States must take further action to enhance the security of data in the financial marketplace. While the U.S. Government’s credit, debit, and other payment card programs already include protections against fraud, the Government must further strengthen the security of consumer data and encourage the adoption of enhanced safeguards nationwide in a manner that protects privacy and confidentiality while maintaining an efficient and innovative financial system.

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to improve the security of consumer financial transactions in both the private and public sectors, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Secure Government Payments. In order to strengthen data security and thereby better protect citizens doing business with the Government, executive departments and agencies (agencies) shall, as soon as possible, transition payment processing terminals and credit, debit, and other payment cards to employ enhanced security features, including chip-and-PIN technology (emboldening added). In determining enhanced security features to employ, agencies shall consider relevant voluntary consensus standards and specifications, as appropriate, consistent with the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 and Office of Management and Budget Circular A-119.

(a) The Secretary of the Treasury shall take necessary steps to ensure that payment processing terminals acquired by agencies through the Department of the Treasury or through alternative means authorized by the Department of the Treasury have enhanced security features. No later than January 1, 2015, all new payment processing terminals acquired in these ways shall include hardware necessary to support such enhanced security features. By January 1, 2015, the Department of the Treasury shall develop a plan for agencies to install enabling software that supports enhanced security features.

(b) The Administrator of General Services shall take necessary steps to ensure that credit, debit, and other payment cards provided through General Services Administration (GSA) contracts have enhanced security features, and shall begin replacing credit, debit, and other payment cards without enhanced security features no later than January 1, 2015.

(c) The Secretary of the Treasury shall take necessary steps to ensure that Direct Express prepaid debit cards for administering Government benefits have enhanced security features, and by January 1, 2015, the Department of the Treasury shall develop a plan for the replacement of Direct Express prepaid debit cards without enhanced security features.

(d) By January 1, 2015, other agencies with credit, debit, and other payment card programs shall provide to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) plans for ensuring that their credit, debit, and other payment cards have enhanced security features.

(e) Nothing in this order shall be construed to preclude agencies from adopting additional standards or upgrading to more effective technology and standards to improve the security of consumer financial transactions as technologies and threats evolve.

Sec. 2. Improved Identity Theft Remediation. To reduce the burden on consumers who have been victims of identity theft, including by substantially reducing the amount of time necessary for a consumer to remediate typical incidents:

(a) by February 15, 2015, the Attorney General, in coordination with the Secretary of Homeland Security, shall issue guidance to promote regular submissions, as appropriate and permitted by law, by Federal law enforcement agencies of compromised credentials to the National Cyber-Forensics and Training Alliance’s Internet Fraud Alert System;

(b) the Department of Justice, the Department of Commerce, and the Social Security Administration shall identify all publicly available agency resources for victims of identity theft, and shall provide to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) information about such resources no later than March 15, 2015, with updates thereafter as necessary. These agencies shall work in consultation with the FTC to streamline these resources and consolidate them wherever possible at the FTC’s public website, IdentityTheft.gov; and

(c) OMB and GSA shall assist the FTC in enhancing the functionality of IdentityTheft.gov, including by coordinating with the credit bureaus to streamline the reporting and remediation process with credit bureaus’ systems to the extent feasible, and in making the enhanced site available to the public by May 15, 2015.

Sec. 3. Securing Federal Transactions Online. To help ensure that sensitive data are shared only with the appropriate person or people, within 90 days of the date of this order, the National Security Council staff, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and OMB shall present to the President a plan, consistent with the guidance set forth in the 2011 National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace, to ensure that all agencies making personal data accessible to citizens through digital applications require the use of multiple factors of authentication and an effective identity proofing process, as appropriate. Within 18 months of the date of this order, relevant agencies shall complete any required implementation steps set forth in the plan prepared pursuant to this section.

Sec. 4. General Provisions. (a) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(b) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
October 17, 2014.

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Executive Order: Ordering the Selected Reserve and Certain Individual Ready Reserve Members of the Armed Forces to Active Duty

ORDERING THE SELECTED RESERVE AND CERTAIN INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES TO ACTIVE DUTY

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including sections 121 and 12304 of title 10, United States Code, I hereby determine that it is necessary to augment the active Armed Forces of the United States for the effective conduct of Operation United Assistance, which is providing support to civilian-led humanitarian assistance and consequence management support related to the Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa. In furtherance of this operation, under the stated authority, I hereby authorize the Secretary of Defense, and the Secretary of Homeland Security with respect to the Coast Guard when it is not operating as a service in the Navy, under their respective jurisdictions, to order to active duty any units, and any individual members not assigned to a unit organized to serve as a unit of the Selected Reserve, or any member in the Individual Ready Reserve mobilization category and designated as essential under regulations prescribed by the Secretary concerned, and to terminate the service of those units and members ordered to active duty.

This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

BARACK OBAMA

THE WHITE HOUSE,
October 16, 2014.

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