September 19, 2019

Echinococcus Multilocularis Found in One Quarter of Wolves, Coyotes, Foxes

“Echinococcus multilocularis is a tiny tapeworm less than four millimetres long. Its life cycle begins when small rodents, such as mice and voles, consume its eggs, which then form cysts on their liver, lungs, brain and other organs. When dogs or cats eat infected rodents, larvae within the cysts develop into adult tapeworms. Infected dogs and cats release tapeworm eggs in their excrement, which can be eaten by rodents to start the tapeworm’s life cycle again.

Humans can inadvertently consume tapeworm eggs if they handle the excrement of infected dogs and then touch their own food, or if they eat things — such as berries, mushrooms or herbs — that are contaminated by infected dog or cat droppings.

If that happens, tapeworm cysts can spread throughout the person’s liver and other organs like a tumour.” <<<Read More>>>

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Wolves, coyotes and foxes roaming Trenton streets, councilman says

*Editor’s Note* – Snicker…snicker. And what should people expect? Protect them and they will come!

Packs of wild animals including wolves, coyotes and foxes are running around on city streets after dark and residents are raising concerns about their safety, according to a Trenton councilman.Councilman George Muschal said he received reports from residents about the animals and saw a gray fox cross in front of his truck last Tuesday at the corner of Hudson and Broad Streets.”If a child is out there or a dog in the yard it might be a problem,” said Muschal, speaking during a council meeting Thursday night

Source: Wolves, coyotes and foxes roaming Trenton streets, councilman says | NJ.com

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Real or Not: Wolves, Coyotes and Foxes in Downtown Trenton Are Where They Ought to Be

Packs of wild animals including wolves, coyotes and foxes are running around on city streets after dark and residents are raising concerns about their safety, according to a Trenton councilman.

Councilman George Muschal said he received reports from residents about the animals and saw a gray fox cross in front of his truck last Tuesday at the corner of Hudson and Broad Streets.

“If a child is out there or a dog in the yard it might be a problem,” said Muschal, speaking during a council meeting Thursday night.<<<Read More>>>

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E. Multilocularis Spreading Rapidly – Humans Threatened With Alveolar Echinococcosis

“Animal health researchers are watching what appears to be mounting evidence of the spread of a potentially dangerous parasite in coyotes, foxes and other animals in Canada.

That’s a concern, they suggest, because the parasite, a tapeworm, can on occasion spill over from its wild animal hosts to infect dogs and humans.

And while people aren’t the tapeworm’s preferred hosts, a growing number of human cases are being seen in Europe and parts of the world where the parasite is more established.”<<<Read More>>>

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Echinococcus multilocularis in Urban Coyotes, Alberta, Canada

From the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention:

Abstract

Echinococcus multilocularis is a zoonotic parasite in wild canids. We determined its frequency in urban coyotes (Canis latrans) in Alberta, Canada. We detected E. multilocularis in 23 of 91 coyotes in this region. This parasite is a public health concern throughout the Northern Hemisphere, partly because of increased urbanization of wild canids.<<<Read More>>>

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