August 24, 2019

Wake Zone, Op-Ed – May 22, 2036 Watch What The Future Holds:

*Editor’s Note* – This Op Ed, written by John Kolezar, first appeared in the Western Outdoor Times. It is republished here with permission from the author.

‘The End Of The World As We Know It’

‘This is the end’… Jim Morrison, 1967

The annual hunting season, long declared to be barbaric by the social media watchdogs, was officially cancelled today by the Arizona Species Specialists, a group of environmentally sensitive and morally conscious individuals who report to the chair of the Prohibited Actions On Public Lands Committee.

While the demise of the hunting practice has long been predicted, today’s announcement came as a mild surprise to those who had hoped that the recreational activity might hold on for a few more years. The following is a re-cap of events that precipitated the announcement.

We Should Have Seen It Coming

In 2016

In 2016, then President Obama declared over 1.7 million acres of the Grand Canyon area to be declared a National Monument. Not satisfied with the restrictions imposed on land use by the monument designation, members of the Sierra Club, Center for Biological Diversity and Defenders of Wildlife filed suit in federal court in 2017 to have access denied to all but bird watchers, sightseers and certain government officials. Their claims of “Monument Degradation” was the first step in the cornerstone of limited access to public lands.

In 2018

In 2018, the Horses Forever group filed suit in federal court to have more open spaces for the Wild Horse and Burro Act. The judge, upon hearing that no one could prove that the horses were not long lost descendants of the Spanish Conquistadors, found in favor of the Horses Forever group and declared that the whole of Arizona andNevada that was not within designated city limits be declared open range for horses and burros.

The decision was challenged in court by the then Arizona Game & Fish Department but ultimately the Supreme Court found in favor of the plaintiffs and virtually all of Arizona and Nevada became refuge land for wild horses and burros.

In 2022

In 2022, with water in extremely short supply, the President of the United States declared that while Congress had debated for years, he was declaring a state of emergency for the entire Southwest. The states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada and California were placed on population-reduction quotas that mandated within a five (5)-year time frame, the populations needed to be reduced by more than 20 percent.

The general consensus at the time was that sustainability graphs proved the entire Southwest could not survive without population reduction. Included in the population counts were all people and animals that weighed over 100 pounds. The carrying capacity index that the government installed in 2020 showed that the Wild horse and Burro Act took precedence over most other Wildlife and particularly non-essential Wildlife such as deer and Elk.

With the enforcement of the Endangered Species Act regarding Mexican gray wolves and Northern gray wolves, fawn and calf survival rates plummeted for what had been large herds of deer and Elk.

In 2024

In 2024, the “Year of the Drought”, Wildlife other than horses and burros, were effectively removed from all federal lands by federal sharpshooters. These were the same sharpshooters that culled over 500 head of bison/buffalo in 2017 from the grand canyon national park. Senate and Congressional inquiries on how every single bison/buffalo had been culled have been ongoing for over 15 years.

The sharpshooters were able to lethally cull over 20,000 deer and Elk within a single year. It had been determined in that same year that all hunting of predators was illegal and they were needed to remove what few animals remained in the wild on federal lands.

In 2025

In 2025, The Center for Biological Diversity filed a massive lawsuit against the United States Fish & WildlifeService. They had discovered that cell anomalies within snakes, lizards and certain plants meant that every individual snake, lizard and plant within a 200 mile radius of PHOENIX was to be declared an “Endangered Species”.

Reproductive anomalies created wide genetic variations within each species. Their lawsuit brought the total number of ESA species to a staggering 495 different species in Arizona alone.

The Fish & Wildlife Service agreed to place drone patrols over much of Arizona. Drivers of vehicles on asphalt roads are now required to give right of way to all rodents, snakes, and plants. Driving on gravel roads is prohibited on federal lands.

In 2027

In 2027, the activity known as “hunting” was challenged by the group “We Are All Animals”, or “WAAA” as they later became known as. In an unprecedented case, it was determined that there was no proven need to kill any animal outside of approved government “Compassionate Dispatch” shelters.

The Vegan Society proved that there was no need for consumption of dead meat and that all nutrients could be obtained through genetically modified plants, herbs and spices. It was the first time that hunting was challenged in court and the Supreme Court, that coincidentally had five justices who were avowed vegans, upheld the lower vegan court decision.

The Compassionate Dispatch centers now employ over 125,000 inmates from various penitentiaries around the United States to compassionately end life for all creatures that have lived their natural lives. Those lives have a pre-determined length based on species. The case, however, only applied to federal land animals.

In 2029

In 2029, after years of dwindling economic support from killers/hunters, all Pittman Robinson monies that had previously been from the sales of hunting-related items were re-dedicated to support of the Wild Horse and Burro Act for Arizona and Nevada. With the advancement of technology, activated drones were capable of determining if armed humans were participating in attempting to perform hunting activities on federal lands.

Through presidential decree, those drones were armed with micro-chip darts that could not be removed from a person if implanted. Those few souls who attempted to hunt on federal lands and were found to have the chip fired into their person by the drones were sentenced to 20 years probation after five years of federal penitentiary lock up.

Humanities classes and sensitivity training for 60 hours per week were deemed minimum parts of their incarceration.

In 2031

In 2031, state organizations cropped up that attempted to outlaw hunting on state lands. One of the more successful groups, “Humans and Animals in Harmony” (also called “HAAH”) began a successful campaign in the state educational system where they showed that the activity of hunting was traced to a particular gene which could be altered in a child while the child was still in the mother’s womb.

Efforts to identify the gene are still in clinical trial status, but hope is held that future generations of children will have the gene completely removed. The only complaints to date have been that those who had the gene removed are generally docile, complacent and frequently need reassurance that they are loved.

In 2034

In 2034, the State of Arizona declared that the Arizona Wildlife Enhancement Division, formerly called the Arizona Game & Fish Department – which was financially destitute from lack of funding via license sales – be merged into the State Parks Division. All 36 employees, including those who count the few remaining deer and Elk, are now Park personnel.

Their jobs will be to continue issuing citations for anyone who leaves either asphalt or paved roads in their all-terrain vehicles. Those vehicles, once numbering in the thousands, have plummeted since over 80 percent ofArizona has been declared National Monument land with little or no access for travel. A recent survey on the Web site Tellusallyourthoughts.com confirmed that over 95 percent of all residents approve of the transformation and that those who disagreed were either incredibly stupid or part of the crazy old timer generation.

Think This Can’t Happen?

Think this can’t happen? Watch what the future holds for those who love to hunt. We are being systematically removed from that which we love to do and very few people are taking any actions to stop the freight train of political correctness.

JK

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Maine IFW Chief: A Century From Now People Will Say…………

I suppose I could call it some form of job security, but why people at the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife continue to provide fodder that prompts repeated demands for accountability on my part, puzzles me. Evidently the Sportsman’s Congress, sponsored by the Sportsman’s Alliance of Maine, was the breeding ground for yet another jewel of spoken words.

In Deirdre Fleming’s article in Saturday’s Press Herald, she begins her piece this way:

A century from now, Mainers will look back and say the state’s fish and game department did what it promised, vowed Chandler Woodcock on Friday.

This remark, as written in Fleming’s piece, came as Mr. Woodcock addressed the Sportsman’s Congress. Part of that debate included discussions on Maine’s efforts, or lack thereof, in rebuilding a whitetail deer herd that is far from adequate.

While some attempts at regulating Maine’s game began in the early to mid 1800s, it was around a century or so ago that Maine and most states in the Union were devising fish and game laws that became the backbone for the North American wildlife management model.

One would have to wonder if the head of Maine’s fish and game around the turn of the century had said, “A century from now, Maine will be at a crossroads not willing to do what is right to protect and perpetuate the game species for the people of this state”, people would have thought him crazy.

But here we are and the current commissioner is talking about the hope that between now and a hundred years from now the deer problem will be saved. I’m sure I will be told that Mr. Woodcock didn’t mean that it would take 100 years to replenish the deer herd. I’m also sure that the same supporters of his comments will claim that Mr. Woodcock feels so strongly about his “Plan for Maine’s Deer” that it will be the greatest thing since the Ginsu Kitchen Knife…….or something.

Perhaps so, and I would suppose a quick pat on the back would be in store for attempting to raise sportsman’s hopes for the future but why would he choose to pick 100 years? I mean, how many fish and game commissioners that have come before Mr. Woodcock have left behind some kind of lasting legacy? How many can you name that we should all remember from 100 years ago? Or twenty years ago? That’s what I thought.

I honestly don’t think Mr. Woodcock is thinking about his legacy, so I have to think that little thought went into his choice of making reference to a century from now.

The current Maine sportsmen are looking for action NOW. They want actions NOW that will create results NOW. And then they want assurances that what we do NOW will pay off NOW and TOMORROW and the NEXT DAY, and that other plans taking place NOW will work at building and maintaining a deer herd 5 years from now and 10 years from now. And the commissioner speaks of what Maine people will be commenting on in 100 years? Are we supposed to lock up our hunting rifles now and make sure our wills are up-to-date so we pass on our hunting rifles to the proper inheritor?

The Commissioner has a plan to rebuild the deer herd. I think he thinks it is a good plan and that it will work. I have serious reservations about it and even if I thought it was a good plan, how can it be implemented with little support for it statewide that is being shown now?

Mr. Woodcock does need to continue to sell his plan. I’m afraid telling the sportsmen that things will be just ducky in 100 years really isn’t going to fire up the troops too much.

I can hear the faint echos now: “Five score and 7 years ago, our founding fathers brought forth in this state, Maine’s Game Plan for Deer , conceived in good thinking and dedicated to the proposition that in one hundred years men would look back and say, ‘What the hell were they thinking’?”

Tom Remington

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