July 23, 2017

Glyphosate Contaminants In Processed Brand Name Foods

Glyphosate is the main chemical active in several brands of agricultural and corporate farming herbicides used in the growing fields; in GMO seed crop cultures; and in what’s called “preharvest staging” [1]. That’s when the herbicide is sprayed several days [3 to 5 days] prior to crop harvest to “ensure” seed heads mature evenly. Some consider that process acts as a “desiccant.”

The more commonly-used herbicide is Roundup® manufactured by Monsanto. In GMO farming, there is Roundup Ready® seeds, which are totally different from heirloom or non-GMO seeds. One specific difference is GMO seeds have patents on them, meaning something has been done to modify the seed from the parent or original plant strain produced by Nature.<<<Read More>>>

Share

Glyphosate Spraying Killing Whitetail Deer in New Brunswick

KJIPUKTUK (Halifax) — The Halifax Media Co-op has acquired a series of internal communications from New Brunswick’s Department of Natural Resources that comprise literally hundreds of pages of emails related to newly-retired, whistle blowing, provincial deer biologist Rod Cumberland.

These communications are interesting for a variety of reasons, the least of which because they provide an insight into the manner that the bureaucratic machine in New Brunswick is very much linked into streamlining their publicly-presented message with their counterparts in industry, in particular with the efforts of J.D. Irving.

Whistle-blowing scientists take note: Never underestimate your ability to send your former employer into reaction mode, with all the bureaucratic and corporate cooperation and message massaging that that entails.

Upon his retirement in 2013, Cumberland, with early assistance from the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, began to publicly rail against the effects of New Brunswick’s glyphosate application program, whereby, since the 1970s, an estimated 12,000 – 15,000 hectares of Crown land are sprayed with the herbicide per year. Glyphosate mixtures are applied to Crown land in order to eliminate hardwood tree species and select for softwoods, which are then largely used for pulp. Readers may be more familiar with agricultural applications of glyphosate, where it is consistently among the most highly used herbicides in North America.

Cumberland’s wedge issue was that glyphosate spraying in New Brunswick is responsible for the province’s dwindling white-tailed deer population, as it destroys their food supplies. He has, however, continuously highlighted the scientifically-proven detrimental health impacts of exposure to glyphosate mixtures, and has gone so far as to liken the future health-related fall-out from glyphosate applications in New Brunswick to “this generation’s Agent Orange.”<<<Read the Rest of Part I>>><<<Part II Can be Found Here…and there’s a link at the bottom of Part I for Part II.>>>

Share

Eat Some “Roundup” Honey, Honey

“Documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) reveal, for example, that glyphosate residue was found in all of the honey samples tested by the FDA – even honey marketed as being “100% all-natural.” Some of the samples contained twice the European Union’s allowable amount of glyphosate residue, and there is no allowable limit for glyphosate in honey produced in the U.S. – at least not yet.”<<<Read More>>>

The FDA says glyphosate is nothing to be concerned about and that it is harmless to humans. Except it makes your pubic hair fall out….or something.

Share

‘Stop Spraying New Brunswick’ blames deer population decline on herbicides

*Editor’s Note* – In the linked-to article below, there are some interesting graphics showing disparities in have harvest, both where herbicide spraying is done and by method of game harvest.

“The group said they’re concerned about the declining deer population in the province. Group member Peter Gilbert said there’s a link between the fewer number of deer and the use of the herbicide glyphosate in forestry management.

“Glyphosate is not the only factor involved in the decline of the deer population in New Brunswick, but it’s very indirectly the result that we get when we use glyphosate in forestry techniques that involve clear-cutting plantations. That speaks to total destruction of our environment [and] of our ecosystem, that all of the forest species, that all our population, is reliant on for subsistence,” Gilbert said.”<<<Read More>>>

Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) is a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide and crop desiccant. It is anorganophosphorus compound, specifically a phosphonate. It is used to kill weeds, especially annual broadleaf weeds and grasses that compete with crops. It was discovered to be an herbicide by Monsanto chemist John E. Franz in 1970.[3] Monsanto brought it to market in 1974 under the trade name Roundup, and Monsanto’s last commercially relevant United States patent expired in 2000.<<<Read More>>>

Share

The Scotts Co. and Monsanto Co.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Determination of Nonregulated Status of Glyphosate-Resistant Creeping Bentgrass

*Editor’s Note* – For those who don’t know, chemical companies have figured a way to genetically manipulate food crops in order to not be effected by Round Up (glyphosate). Once genetically engineered, Round Up is sprayed on crops to kill weeds that hinder growth. Much of the food you are eating is impregnated with Round Up. In reading the below petition, one has to wonder what other toxic poisons these murdering bastards plan for us.

SUMMARY: We are announcing that the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate the environmental impacts that may result from the approval of a new petition for nonregulated status of glyphosate-resistant creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) (event ASR368) from The Scotts Company and Monsanto Company following withdrawal of their 2003 petition. Issues to be addressed in the EIS include the potential environmental impacts to managed natural and non-agricultural lands, agricultural production systems, the physical environment, biological resources, human health, socioeconomics, federally listed threatened or endangered species, and cultural or historic resources. This notice of intent (NOI) replaces a previous NOI published in September 2004 and initiates a fresh public scoping process and stakeholder engagement for the purpose of preparing an EIS. We are requesting public comments to further frame the scope of the issues to be included in the EIS, including alternatives and environmental impacts.<<<Read More>>>

Share