November 15, 2019

Online Interactive Gear Checklist Now Available for Hunters

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation unveiled an interactive, online gear checklist designed to assist hunters be fully prepared as they head afield.

“This is the quintessential checklist for the elk hunter,” said Steve Decker, RMEF vice president of Marketing. “It can be customized for the rifle hunter or bowhunter and be adjusted according to the length of a hunt.”

The Gear 101 checklist is located on the RMEF website. It allows a user to create an individualized checklist by clicking on one of three options: daytripper, multi-day or outfitted. From there, categories include clothes, food & water, meat care, overnight gear and hunting gear.

Users highlight the tabs most appropriate to their preference, click “download PDF,” and then print that list and use it to prepare for the hunt ahead.

“With all of the latest and greatest gear, so much on our minds before a hunt, I find it critical to have a system to double-check that I don’t forget the smallest of detail,” said Kristy Titus, RMEF Team Elk featured member. “Trust me, I have been on a hunt where someone forgets their tags and has to drive hours home or to the nearest town to pick them up.”

Specific gear from conservation partners who support the RMEF and its mission are included as a benefit for users.

“Our sponsors have years of experience in developing effective, quality products that benefit the elk hunter so it only makes sense that we feature some of those,” added Decker.

Go to here to see the checklist.

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Whitetail-Style Rattling Works on Elk, Too

Press Release from Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.- Whitetail hunters for decades have employed rattling as an effective hunt strategy during the rut. Now more and more elk hunters are catching on.

Two notable hunting writers have covered rattling in recent issues of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s member magazine, “Bugle.” Both found success using slightly different methods and gear. Here’s a rundown:
ElkSparring

Ralph Ramos

1. Antler Preference – Ramos uses one large, 320-class, 6×6 shed as a base antler. During the rattling sequence, this antler mostly lays on the ground while the hunter swings a second antler, usually a broken end with at least three points.

2. Rattling Sequence – Bang the antlers abruptly and aggressively 6-7 times to create the thundering sound of two bulls squaring off. Ramos says real bulls often begin a fight with big theatrics that devolve into a pushing match. So after your initial start, continue by rubbing antlers together, clashing points, raking trees and brush and pounding the ground for at least 10-15 minutes. Lots of noise is realistic. During this sequence, bang the antlers together very forcefully a couple times every 2-3 minutes. Then, after a few minutes of silence, start all over again with round two, and then round three.

3. Calling – Ramos blends a variety of elk calls into the rattling session. Bugles, moans, groans and excited cow calls add realism to the sounds of a fight. If possible, let a second hunter focus on the calling while the first hunter focuses on the rattling.

4. Be Sure to Try – Switching off. Ramos says this hunting method takes a physical toll on a hunter’s upper body so it’s good to let two hunters split the rattling and calling duties.

5. Notes – Bulls generally bugle as they approach, but not always. Sometimes they slip in silently, as if trying to steal a hot cow away from the battling bulls. Stay alert! To watch a video of Ramos’ rattling technique, go here

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrhrbNl9KpQ).

Mark Kayser

1. Antler Preference – Kayser prefers a set of raghorn sheds, to save weight. A hunter can lighten his load even more by not using antlers at all. Consider commercial products that mimic rattling sounds, like the Rattlecage (http://rattlecage.com).

2. Rattling Sequence – See No. 2 above.

3. Calling – Use a series of high-intensity bugles with two different tones to imitate two different bulls. For example, make one a growler and the other a chuckler. Be creative in your own style.

4. Be Sure to Try – If you don’t carry actual antlers, you can use a large stick to scrape trees and ground, adding even more realism to the rattling sounds.

5. Notes – Kayser used rattling to draw a bull from a neighboring property. It took only a few minutes for an elk to respond to the sounds, cross a fence and walk within bow range.

“Bugle” magazine is a bi-monthly publication that covers hunting, conservation, elk ecology, predator issues, RMEF membership news and much more, plus memorable hunting stories and outstanding photography. Visit www.rmef.org for details.

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Skinning a Deer With Your Car

You may have seen this before….or at least some version of it. I’m not going to go searching, but I think I recall having posted a video perhaps 6 or more years ago showing a similar event.

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