August 25, 2019

Is Maine Really in the Midst of Deer Hunting Season?

I wonder if the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) is ashamed or embarrassed that it is regulating and administering the state’s annual deer hunting season? – or any of the big game hunting seasons for that matter.

Someone visiting the state would have no idea unless they happened to see some people running around with hunter orange clothing on, but then again, blaze orange is often daily attire for some of the locals. The majority of Maine residents don’t even know the deer hunt is on. Didn’t it use to be a right of passage? Didn’t kids skip school, with or without their parents’ permission, to go deer hunting? Hell, I did!!! Once I even went to the boys’ room and lit a cigarette (I didn’t smoke) so I would get expelled from school to have more time to deer hunt. The principal laughed at me and told me I would have to wait until Saturday like everyone else.

It was a time when the fish and game department got to brag about the successes of their efforts at managing deer, touting the number of deer tagged, even in estimations. In a way, it was the canary in the coal mine of successful deer management.

Is that what’s going on? Is the MDIFW refusing to acknowledge the deer season because they are ashamed of how global warming has yet to produce more deer? Or maybe it’s because most managers are believers in nonconsumptive use – that animals should be protected from all killing, even when scientifically proven over generations to be the trophy model of success. The brainwashing is in full metal jacket.

I’ve spoken often of what appears to be the deliberate act of not placing live data of deer tagging on the websites so we can all see. If you are a mainstream media person in good standing with MDIFW, you can call or email and ask for some numbers, but not the rest of us. MDIFW even fails to take 5 minutes (omg we just don’t have the resources to do that) to send out a press release on their website with a brief update about the hunting season. It’s really like the preteen who insists their parents drop them off a block away from the school for fear the parent might embarrass them somehow.

How do we maintain hunters, say nothing of recruiting new ones, if the MDIFW appears ashamed of the event?

Yesterday, the MDIFW took enough time to release their “Monthy Review.” And what was in the monthly review? About anything except hardly a mention about hunting.

Commissioner Woodcock expresses appreciation to private landowners for land access, we can read about the “mysteries of bats,” honoring fallen game wardens, salmon in Sebago Lake, or learn more about chronic wasting disease.

Whatever happened to the sense of pride in Maine’s deer, bear, and moose hunting seasons?

It is extremely obvious that the MDIFW has little or no interest in such things anymore and is a precursor to what lies ahead for those left who still enjoy hunting. I’ll give it 10 years, perhaps as many as 20, and it will be a violation to hunt any animal, which would be difficult to do considering that the totalitarians will have what guns they can take away from us and it will be unlawful to own any.

God, the future looks bright, doesn’t it?

I don’t want to be this way. I don’t want to berate the MDIFW, but for 50 years I have paid my way and now the department is too conscience-stricken to even publically speak of one of Maine’s historical events that used to knit a community together. There’s a lot more to “Git ya deeyah yet?” than the poking fun of hunters it is today. It was all that was talked about. Now people get “offended” when they see or even hear about deer hunting.

Evidently, the MDIFW is the same way.

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Anti-Hunting Mental Drool

Along with the time of year when there is much activity with hunting and trapping, we all regularly are subjected to the mental drool of those who don’t like any of the activities. Maybe if they just said I don’t like hunting and trapping and left it at that, some of us wouldn’t bother to single them out to expose their limited mental capacities while disparaging a worthwhile, long-standing, cultural heritage that has unlimited benefits to both man and wildlife – hunting.

A letter scribbler in the Bangor Daily News called hunting and trapping “incivil” – evidently meaning that any reporting in the news about hunting and trapping is offensive, rude, or impolite. The writer also called hunting and trapping an unworthy event and unsportsmanlike and said hunting was no longer “fair chase.”

Here’s a couple of things to ponder. Most of these terms – fair chase, sportsmanlike, etc. – have been crafted by men over the years perhaps as a means of pulling the wool over someone’s eyes about hunting and trapping. They are man-made terms much the same as when some mental midget declares hunting is an act to “prove one’s manhood.”

Fair chase is really nothing but abiding by the laws crafted by men for men to hunt and trap animals for consumptive use. All rules and regulations for hunting and trapping are grounded in species management and public safety – nothing more. I never thought of hunting as a “sport” therefore sportsmanship had nothing to do with the act. I see hunting as something I enjoy doing that occasionally (emphasis on occasionally) rewards me with a few good meals of healthy meat.

So give it a rest already. Take your “fair chase” and “sportsmanship” to the athletic field, where these days everyone gets a “trophy.” Hunting and trapping are a well developed scientific necessity to responsibly manage and maintain a healthy and sustainable game population.

The other issue is one in which I’ve never quite understood. Obvious this whiner takes offense – finds incivility – in news reports about hunting and trapping, and yet in order to find offense, the person must be reading the reports.

As this writer mentions, they find politicians offensive and rude, as do I. I find the solution sensible. Stop reading the articles and looking at the pictures. Any moron should understand that basic concept, but evidently, that is above the capacity of some who would rather whine, bitch, and complain about something they know nothing about.

 

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Feedback Beginning to Come in on Maine’s New Game Tagging System

It was announced a few days ago that Maine was entering the techno-zombie world of electronic game registration. This new system went into effect with the onset of the black bear hunting season. We are also in one of those “Expanded” seasons for deer with archery hunting.

I saw a first comment about the new system of registration from a person who shot and registered a deer taken in the Expanded season.

Essentially, he said the new program was easy to use and mostly begged that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) would begin to allow field registration so tagging could be done in the field with a smartphone.

I hope not.

Field tagging, while appearing convenient to some, presents a myriad of problems as I see it. I’ll present one.

Registering of game serves more than one purpose. It provides game managers a location where they can go and physically inspect the game, take samples, and collect all kinds of data. It is this data that should make Maine wildlife managers better at doing their jobs. Consider what might happen if this data was no longer collected.

Maine is one of those states that is not overrun with deer for example. Because of this, more importance is put on responsible and effective deer management. Data is vital to accomplishing this.

Let’s not be greedy. I’m still in a bit of shock over this announcement of MDIFW moving to a more modern form of game registration. We should be thankful for that. We should also be eager to be a part of game management by understanding the need to visit a registration center to tag our haul.

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Crossbow Not a Firearm, Not a “True” Bow

I got snickering a bit yesterday as I read V. Paul Reynolds article about crossbows and how certain rules regulating the use of crossbows for hunting have changed. In his article, he states: “The Maine Warden Service considers the crossbow not to be a firearm. The Maine Bowhunters Association (MBA) could never warm up to the medieval contraption, deeming it not a true bow.”

I’m not here to try to convince anybody about whether or not a crossbow should or shouldn’t be used as a weapon to kill certain game at certain times and in certain places. Instead, I’d rather talk about why some don’t like the idea because it ruffles their feathers in some odd fashion…I guess.

The Maine Warden Service, according to Reynolds, believes the crossbow “not to be a firearm.” This one is easy, provided this is the meaning of the comment that it isn’t a firearm and not that it isn’t a weapon that could be used for killing/hunting.

According to the dictionary, a firearm is a pistol, rifle, shotgun, etc. According to the BAFTE, a firearm is any weapon that uses an explosive to propel a projectile. So, technically a crossbow is not a firearm.

I’ve known for some time that the Maine Bowhunters Association has resisted allowing crossbows for hunting. I’ve read some members as saying it isn’t in the same category as “bow hunting” and that even the image of the crossbow somehow dirties the image of bow hunting in general. Oh, come on! Are we playing with the same notion that somehow the looks of a weapon determines its killing capacity?

It should always be remembered that opportunities to hunt are usually a good thing but that those opportunities are always going to be restricted by the desired and actual harvest of the game we are in pursuit of. Whether we hunt with a pistol, rifle, bow, crossbow, or a handful of rocks, biologists and hunting regulators are not going to allow us to kill too many animals.

Some have a problem with the so-called muzzleloader season for deer, believing the muzzleloader, a “primitive” weapon, is not a “true” gun of the modern era. It can and has been repeated that the modern muzzleloader is far from a primitive weapon.

Do muzzleloaders deserve their own special hunting season? Do crossbows deserve their own special hunting season? Do longbows deserve their own special hunting season? Does any weapon deserve its own special hunting season?

I would guess the crossbow is as much a true bow as a muzzleloader is a true rifle.

The longbow – is this the “true” bow? – has been around longer than the crossbow dating back to around 3,000 BC…maybe. Not long after this, the crossbow of a fashion was designed for warfare. Both weapons were designed for and used in warfare killing millions of people over the years.

A crossbow is not a firearm because it doesn’t fire. Why isn’t the crossbow a “true” bow? Probably for the same reason, that to some a muzzleloader is not a true rifle. In other words, they just plain don’t like the damned things.

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Pick A Side: Eco-Imperialism Or Wildlife Conservation

Hunters conserve and save wildlife when no one else will or can.

Want to save wildlife in wild places? Convince misguided would-be “saviors” that they need to throttle back, cease making death threats and doing other terrorist things.

In just the past few days there has been a spate of Internet and social media attacks on hunters for their choices to participate in legal hunting at various places around the globe.

The attacks come in two basic forms: Ridicule and death threats. Differences of opinion are healthy. Death threats are both sick and illegal.<<<Read More>>>

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Restraining Order Issued to Stop Grizzly Bear Hunts

A very biased report on the actions of a judge in Montana who issued a temporary restraining order to stop a grizzly bear hunt:

“A federal judge in Montana on Thursday issued a court order temporarily blocking the first trophy hunts of Yellowstone-area grizzly bears in more than 40 years, siding with native American groups and environmentalists seeking to restore the animals’ protected status.

The 14-day restraining order by U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen in Missoula, Montana, came two days before Wyoming and Idaho were scheduled to open licensed grizzly hunts allowing as many as 23 bears in the two states to be shot and killed for sport.”<<<Read More>>>

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Record Number of Doe Permits Unanimously Approved by Maine Advisory Council

There were no objections from the Advisory Council to the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife’s (MDIFW) proposal to issue nearly 85,000 “Any-Deer” permits for this upcoming deer hunting season – an all-time record number.

Sensible people might have thought that with the state’s deer hunting still running at abysmal levels in some places of the state with harvest numbers continually far below what used to be normal, at least one member of the Advisory Council would have objected to this proposal.

It has been made clear that the majority of the increase comes in Wildlife Management Districts (WMD) where last year’s projected (or hoped-for) doe harvest was not reached. However, I find it most unscientific when the MDIFW repeatedly says, “The proposed increase in permits is a result of the goals and objectives set by the public in the state’s big-game management plan…”

Scape Goat?

Evidently, in this modern era in which Environmentalism rules game management plans are driven by social demands and not by science. MDIFW may become another laughing stock as they move toward a focus on “healthy” game species rather than paying much attention to numbers. History has proven that with overgrown numbers of any species, health becomes the number one issue. Wildlife over-protection is an agenda item of Environmentalists which is a “social” action in which MDIFW now makes their management decisions by. Along with that over-protection comes large swings in animal populations, especially when disease and predators, are “balancing” nature.

It will be interesting to see the results of this increase in “Any-Deer” permits. MDIFW claims that the quota for doe kills was not reached in all but six of the WMDs, but have failed to answer the question as to why – was it due to too few permits issued for those regions or lack of licensed hunters and/or enough time to hunt in order to reach those quotas? It does make a difference.

If there are simply not enough hunters and/or the season isn’t long enough to reach the desired harvest, certainly adding more permits, by 28%, will do little to reach those desired harvest levels.

And please don’t tell us that does aren’t being shot because there is an over-abundance of bucks.

Permit winners will be announced September 7.

 

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Maine’s 2018-2019 Hunting Laws Now Available Online

Being a responsible user of the Maine outdoors means staying informed of, and complying with, the current laws and rules.

MDIFW’s popular summary guides make it easy to find and follow the laws and rules that apply to you. And now, our NEW digital formats allow you to quickly check a law, confirm legal hunting hours, look up best practices and more – from anywhere, anytime. 

Just visit mefishwildlife.com/laws


No cell coverage in the woods? No problem.

Just visit mefishwildlife.com/laws and browse by activity. Before you head into the woods, follow these instructions to save an offline law book or quick reference guide to your mobile device.

iphone

  1. Download the Adobe Acrobat Reader or iBooks app.
  2. In Safari, go to: mefishwildlife.com/laws
  3. Click the link for the PDF you want to download.
  4. When it opens, tap on the share icon in the bottom center of the screen, then tap “Copy to Adobe Acrobat Reader” or “Copy to iBooks”. The file is now saved in your Adobe Acrobat Reader app and your iBooks app for offline viewing.
android

  1. In Chrome, go to: mefishwildlife.com/laws
  2. Select the link for the PDF you want to download.
  3. Choose to download the file to your Downloads folder OR
  4. Download the Adobe Acrobat Reader app and open the PDF.
computer

Go to mefishwildlife.com/laws to save a copy and/or print just the pages you need.


You will find a series of helpful quick reference guides as well, including a legal hunting time table and a chart of the hunting seasons and bag limits.


Why digital law books?

money

In 2016, we printed over 700,000 law books. Thats a lot of paper and a lot of resources diverted from Maine’s fish and wildlife.

With 77% of the U.S. population using smartphones in 2017, our agency’s mission clearly directed us to make a shift. And while we’re still priting some books (available at licence agent locations), we’re asking you to do your part and make use of the convenient and responsible digital options.

As a bonus, the digital options are searchable and always on hand, as long as you have your mobile device. If you always keep it on you (and charged) to take photos or use the GPS, this is a no-brainer.


Hunting season is approaching! Be prepared and be sure to review Maine’s 2018-2019 hunting laws today.

huntinglawscover

 

We hope you have a safe and enjoyable hunting season in Maine!

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Bye, Bye Partner

By Jim Beers:

See the article below regarding one more intended but denied future casualty of the war on hunting – hunting dog breeds

In the USA –

  • As more predators are introduced and protected from any management;
  • As more hunting license revenue & Excise Taxes & and state wildlife agency’s manpower are diverted to non-game and predator babysitting, propagandizing and cover-ups;
  • As wildlife management for people is supplanted by wildlife worship laws, and displacement of human activity and rights for animals is prioritized over humans;
  • As Universities, bureaucrats, politicians and the nouveau “scientists” of “overseeing” natural processes without intervention in our environment reap the rewards of catering to those false ideas:

“public hunting” will decline.

Game management is no longer understood or practiced by government bureaucracies founded to do so.  What game will be left on the “public lands” will continue to decline, government controls of public lands will continue to grow, private property will be either controlled by government ideologues through new laws and easements or will be used so intensively that game sightings will become like Ivory-billed woodpecker “sightings” (only fodder for bureaucracies to get more money and hire more people).  When combined with the ferocity of anti-gun political movements and the propagandizing of children in the public schools on these matters things do not bode well for the optimistic view that the numbers of hunters and the availability, indeed the very existence, of game birds (and big game for that matter) will continue to underpin dog breeds and all that creates thanks to “public hunting”  in the USA.

The English, as so often in past, have solved such dilemmas by leaving them to only the rich landowners and their patrician class.  This has been the case for centuries for both hunting and fishing in the British Isles.  In one very real sense, they are at least honest about it.  In the past 50 years in the US we have allowed liars, animal worship ideologues, politicians, bureaucrats, school teachers, socialists, vote-hungry conservatives and urban dreamers to conduct an offensive against hunting and animal management for human benefit that rivals the breadth and diversity of the offensive by the Allies against The Third Reich.  Yet we look the other way and avoid argument or any meaningful challenge to what is happening.

As we compromise and compromise public hunting and game on public land decline.  As the demand for game dogs in the US eventually declines, dog breeds and breeders will decline as the author notes in Britain.  Whether game farms and paid-for hunting can generate enough demand to make a difference is, in my opinion, not likely.  Either such breeds will disappear or be bred into fine-boned “beauties” like Irish setters have become or into some sort of “scientific” breed that doesn’t shed, doesn’t bark, licks the kids, is content in a condo, and is considered beautiful by vegans and others opposed to the old practice of “owning” any animal.

I want to thank Mr. Tom Keer for this informative article highlighting one more casualty of environmental/animal rights agendas, and to Sporting Classics Daily for making it available.

Jim Beers

23 July 2018

Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC.  He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands.  He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC.  He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority.  He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.

Link to Article:

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RMEF Team Elk Returns

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—Heart-pumping elk hunts and tales of conservation success highlight the eighth season of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s award-winning television show, RMEF Team Elk, presented by Bass Pro Shops/Cabelas’s.

Team Elk captures the essence of up-close, adrenaline-filled encounters with elk as well as the beauty of the backcountry,” said Steve Decker, RMEF vice president of Marketing. “We are excited to unveil another season as we highlight how Hunting is Conservation.”

Season eight of RMEF Team Elk begins the week of July 2. It airs every Sunday at 9 p.m. Additional weekly airings include Mondays at 3 a.m., Tuesdays at 5:30 a.m. and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. (all times MT) on Outdoor Channel.

Hosted by Brandon Bates, highlighted episodes feature an elk migration scientist and the conservation director of one of the nation’s largest outdoor retailers talking conservation and chasing elk in New Mexico, a father-son duo from Wisconsin hunting elk in Montana using archery equipment they build and two participants of the Conservation Leaders for Tomorrow program in Colorado on their first-ever elk hunt, among others.

Presented by Bass Pro Shops/Cabela’s, additional sponsors include Browning, Browning Ammunition, Buck Knives, Danner, Eberlestock, Mathews, PEAK BlueDEF, Sitka, Wildgame Innovations, Yeti and Zeiss, with special thanks to ALPS OutdoorZ, Bog-Pod and Yamaha.

“We are grateful for our conservation partners who value hunting and support RMEF’s conservation mission of ensuring the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage,” added Decker.

You can watch the first six seasons of RMEF Team Elk online anytime for free on the Elk Network.

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