May 25, 2019

When Totalitarians Steal Your Presumed Land Rights

Perhaps the first mistake of mind is a false understanding that you, as an individual, are part of “We the People” as found in the U.S. Constitution. The Constitution was constructed for “We the People”; that is owners or shareholders of the corporation called the United States and from that point passed on down to their posterity as is mentioned in that constitution. Individual states signed on to the corporation and became legal participants. Each time you sign your name to any legal document of the state, you are agreeing and willing to abide by the terms of that corporation. In short, you only have rights as are meted out by the corporation, including land ownership. The corporation permits you to carry out other functions as a benefit to them, not to you.

A tough pill to swallow.

Because from birth we are brainwashed to think we live in a free “democratic” country, where “We the People” are “you the people” you think you have power over others simply by finding more voters to go against their “freedoms.” Believing that a democratic rule is somehow American (being defined as the majority so desires) and serving as the useful idiots for the posterity of “We the People” corporate rulers, our mostly false understanding of democracy has quickly morphed into a totalitarian rule accomplished by years of mind manipulation. In layman’s terms – tying the noose that will ultimately hang you.

We live in a society that seems empowered to force the idealism of enough people onto others regardless of any perceived rights. What makes totalitarianism successful is the ability of the centralized system of government and their controllers to indoctrinate the masses into certain beliefs and attitudes. Once a dictatorial, centralized government has molded the minds of non-thinking people, those people are used to do the bidding for the government in power. It works marvelously!

We can see all this in action wherever we go if we understand the reality and look for it. Few do or care.

Yesterday I was reading an article, several actually, about how the Maine Land Use Planning Commission (LUPC) is considering modifying their controls and regulations that could allow for greater development of lands that fall under the government control of the LUPC, i.e. “unorganized townships.”

Useful idiots for a centralized government, ignorant totalitarians, one day decided what their ideal desires were for someone else’s private land. Yeah, that’s right. You see, nobody owns land. We may hold a “tenants in common” deed, that grants us the privilege to pay tribute to the governments in control, under their very strict regulations, but when push comes to shove we are helpless. There may come a time when the government decides they have need of your land and so take it with little recourse to you.

To help accomplish the wishes of centralized government, “education” programs are established that are designed to tell us what it is we want. So-called “change agents” of centralized government go out into the community and using powerful tactics designed from a firm understanding of man’s nature and ease of mind manipulation, convince other people of what society should be like and all aspects that make up our surroundings. With a majority support of the useful idiots, most anything can be accomplished while causing people to believe it is democracy in action.

One of those bits of idealism involves a “vision” of what communities and private land should be. And thus was born the Land Use Planning Commission, or whatever the name of your state’s dictatorial land use organization is called, in order that land use falls within the ideological bounds of brainwashed citizens.

I never hear anyone ask why there is such a commission…never. It also seems that the only time private citizens have much to say about the fascist form of dictatorial rule is when that rule directly effects them – if they can even recognize it. Aside from that, it is always the brainwashed, ignorant totalitarians who demand that you conform to the strict regulations of the LUPC in order that you can have your ideal, protected, isolated fantasy that someone else is paying for.

Ignorant totalitarians care not whether a person or a corporation has invested heavily in any property for purposes of providing a product to consumers, and yes, for profit, they have been convinced that it is imperative that all that land be locked up in order to fit their idealism.

This is totalitarianism at its best, carried out and perpetuated by non-thinkers who believe their democracy provides them the power to steal away the rights and lifestyle of all others.

I was reading another piece of work called, “Forging a Common Vision for Maine’s North Woods.” Think about that title for a moment. Why is it so important to these robotic destroyers of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, that they forge a “common vision” (communism) of what doesn’t even belong to them? Who do we think we are? What have we become?

Hidden within the disguise of protection, while never hinting at the perpetuation of one’s idealist social agenda, we can read about the effort of “forging a common vision.”

Efforts to protect the working landscapes and rural communities of northern Maine could benefit from a broader, more comprehensive view of the region and its challenges. Indeed, forest fragmentation, parcelization, sprawl, and rural economic development all transcend municipal and county jurisdictions, and suggest the need for a regional or landscape-level approach (Foster 2001). This approach should identify and strengthen the region’s ecological, economic, social, cultural, and political assets, and place these within the larger context of Maine, New England, the Maritime Provinces, and beyond.

Who says? Millions and millions of dollars of somebody’s money have been invested in millions of acres of land in Maine and these totalitarians, lying and hiding behind protection, feel entitled to dictate to those landowners just exactly what they can and cannot do with their land in order that it fits into their “ecological, economic, social, cultural, and political assets” so that it nicely fits within the totalitarian landscape of the broader region. Does that mean make Maine like Massachusetts or does that mean lock up all the land in Maine so that those in Massachusetts can have Maine as their idealistic playground?

But what of the future? It appears that the ignorant totalitarians bent on their own demise by placing full control over property in the hands of a centralized, socialistic government fail to realize the loss of that important monetary tribute the joint tenant is permitted to cede to government. That money serves to further carry out and perpetuate the power and control of the centralized government and yet once the landowners decide their tribute far exceeds the benefits they could realize from their investment, they will give up that land and into whose hands and control will in then fall? Will it become the full control of the corporate United States or the corporate state’s where the land is located? Perhaps it will be turned over to non-tax-paying land trusts or the like, always eager to do the bidding of central government.

Totalitarians want what they want. Do they really know what they are doing? I don’t think so, but the idealism behind the push is overwhelming to them.

There once was a day when land ownership was the creme del a creme. Today, with so little left that a person can do with land, is it any longer worth the investment?

Then what?

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President Proposes $1.3 Billion FY 2018 Budget for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Press Release from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

Budget Makes Commitments to Public Lands, Energy and Public Access

May 23, 2017

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump today proposed a $1.3 billion Fiscal Year 2018 (FY18) budget for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Service’s budget also includes $1.5 billion in permanent funding, which is mostly administered to states through various grants and other initiatives for their wildlife and sportfish conservation programs. The bureau budget helps put the federal government on track to a balanced budget by 2027.

“President Trump promised the American people he would cut wasteful spending and make the government work for the taxpayer again, and that’s exactly what this budget does,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Working carefully with the President, we identified areas where we could reduce spending and also areas for investment, such as addressing the maintenance backlog in our National Parks and increasing domestic energy production on federal lands. The budget also allows the Department to return to the traditional principles of multiple-use management to include both responsible natural resource development and conservation of special places. Being from the West, I’ve seen how years of bloated bureaucracy and D.C.-centric policies hurt our rural communities. The President’s budget saves taxpayers by focusing program spending, shrinking bureaucracy, and empowering the front lines.”

The President’s budget focuses funding on the nation’s highest priority conservation needs, access to public lands for all Americans, and the agency’s role in streamlining energy development, while containing costs through management efficiencies and other savings to address federal fiscal realities.

“Improving access to national wildlife refuges supports the great American traditions of hunting and fishing that together generate billions of dollars for conservation and billions more for our nation’s economy,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Virginia Johnson. “Accordingly, this budget request prioritizes deferred maintenance funding for national wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries, active habitat management across millions of acres of public lands, and core wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities.”

“Timely environmental review of energy development and other infrastructure needs will create jobs and help the U.S. achieve energy independence,” said Johnson. “This budget also supports our law enforcement officers who support cooperative efforts to secure our borders.”

The FY18 budget includes the President’s continued focus on the following priorities:

America’s Public Lands:

Through the National Wildlife Refuge System, the Service continues the American tradition, started by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1903, of protecting fish and wildlife and their habitats and providing opportunities for hunting, fishing and other outdoor recreation to all Americans. The proposed FY18 funding level for the Refuge System is $470.1 million. The proposed budget maintains a commitment to providing outdoor recreational opportunities in rural, urban or suburban landscapes, including through the Service’s Urban Wildlife Refuge Partnerships program, as well as supporting the vital role of volunteers on our refuges.

American Infrastructure:

Included in the request for National Wildlife Refuges is $136.2 million for improving the Service’s maintenance backlog and to take care of the American public’s investments in facilities and infrastructure managed by the Service. Of this, $41.0 million is to address the backlog in deferred maintenance. This would sustain the Service’s current commitment to eliminate its maintenance backlog in the National Wildlife Refuge System.

In addition, $19.4 million is requested for maintenance of national fish hatcheries, which stock sport and subsistence fish for states and tribes and also propagate and release endangered aquatic species to aid in their recovery. . A further $51.9 million in funding is proposed for national fish hatchery operations.

Invasive species cost our economy billions of dollars each year. To continue its commitment to address this important issue, the Administration proposes level funding for programs that focus on preventing the spread of Asian carp, quagga and zebra mussels, and sea lamprey.

A total of $225.2 million is proposed to implement the Endangered Species Act and related programs, of which $79.6 million is dedicated for species recovery efforts. Recovery funding includes an increase of $1.8 million for working on five-year species reviews and delistings and downlistings.

Birds are important to Americans in many ways. Birdwatching generates $43 billion in economic activity yearly; hunting of migratory waterfowl is a traditional recreational pastime that generates billions more. A total of $44.0 million is requested for the Service’s Migratory Bird program, which provides waterfowl hunting opportunities and encourages conservation of birds and their habitats.

The budget eliminates funding for Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and the Service’s science program, as well as funding for youth programs and the Cooperative Recovery Initiative.

American Safety and Security:

Refuge law enforcement efforts are funded at $37.9 million to enhance visitor and employee safety on our public lands and honor the President’s commitment to improving border security.

Additionally, the Office of Law Enforcement is funded at $73.0 million. The recent escalation in poaching of protected species and the illegal trade in wildlife poses an urgent threat to conservation and global security. Wildlife trafficking generates billions of dollars in illicit revenues each year, contributing to the illegal economy, fueling instability in range nations, and undermining regional security in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Poaching operations themselves have expanded beyond small-scale, opportunistic actions to become a coordinated, large-scale activity often commissioned by armed and organized criminal syndicates that also traffic drugs, arms and people, and that see wildlife trafficking as a low-risk, high-reward alternative. Our continued investment in combatting wildlife trafficking is important to addressing organized crime and saving hundreds of iconic species such as the African elephant and rhino from extinction.  The Service’s International Affairs program is funded at $14.2 million, nearly level with FY17 Continuing Resolution Baseline. The program provides grants and technical assistance for the international conservation of endangered and threatened species.

America First Energy:

The budget includes $98.8 million to facilitate planning and consultation that will support energy development, economic recovery and job creation in the United States. Timely evaluations of proposed infrastructure, energy and other development projects contribute to job creation and economic growth. Funding will allow the Service to expedite project reviews and work with developers on appropriate mitigation and avoidance measures.

The President’s budget also contains proposals to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and gas drilling; to enable the National Wildlife Refuge System to recover damages from persons who injure or destroy federal resources; and to permanently authorize the Recreation Fee Program.

The President’s FY18 budget proposal for the Department of the Interior supports his commitment to create jobs, provide outdoor recreation through hunting and fishing, facilitate energy development, and support law enforcement needs. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Congressional Justification can be found online: www.fws.gov/budget/2018/FY2018-FWS-Greenbook.pdf.

The Department of the Interior oversees one-fifth of the nation’s land and the entire Outer-Continental Shelf. The Department is charged with overseeing energy development on federal lands and waters, grazing allotments and timber sales, water conservation and delivery, upholding tribal trust responsibilities, conservation of wildlife and habitat, and maintaining access for recreation throughout public lands, among other priorities.

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Ranking member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, made the following comment about Trump’s budget proposal:

“Once again, the Trump Administration has turned its back on Teddy Roosevelt-style conservatism and is instead trying to allow special interests to pillage our natural resources so a wealthy few can make themselves even wealthier. We won’t let him.”

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Cantwell, Western Democratic Senators Urge Feds to Lift Sudden Suspension of Public Land Advisory Groups

Press Release from the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources:

WASHINGTON, D.C — Today, Ranking Member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) and a coalition of western Democratic senators today urged the Interior Department to lift its sudden suspension of long-standing local committees and advisory boards that provide essential community input on public land management.

Their letter to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke follows reports that the Department of the Interior (DOI) postponed all meetings for public resource advisory councils and committees (RACs) until September. The letter was led by Sen. Cantwell and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), and signed by Sens. Tom Udall (D-N.M.), Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), Patty Murray (D-Wash.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), and Michael Bennet (D-Colo.).

“We are very concerned about this news and would like an answer as to why the RAC meetings were postponed during the BLM’s review of all advisory boards and committees,” the senators wrote. “It is critical that local voices, including RACs, have the opportunity to provide input and take part in the process at all times, not just when those local voices align with the Administration or a large special interest.”

The advisory groups are designed to get diverse community input on often-contentious public land management issues. These advisory groups were included both in Wyden’s original legislation creating Secure Rural Schools support for counties in Oregon and nationwide; and the Interior Department’s own rules dating back to 1995.

Those advisory groups have long helped to balance questions of environmental and economic impacts by informing decisions on issues such as recreation, land use planning, grazing, oil and gas exploration, and wildfire management.

“Balancing these interests is challenging, which is why RACs were created,” the lawmakers wrote. “By working through difficult land management issues and getting local input from the beginning, projects are more likely to succeed. Without this tool, many good land management projects would never be completed.”

A copy of the entire letter is here.

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