December 12, 2018

Public Access Dispute Solved in Central Oregon

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The public will continue to have access to 43,000 acres of central Oregon’s prime elk country thanks to a group effort including the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Bureau of Land Management, Crook County, Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) and the Waibel Ranches, LLC.

“We are pleased that all parties could come together to provide continued access to a part of Oregon revered by elk hunters and others,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Opening or improving access to our public lands lies at the core of our conservation mission. We hear time and time again from our members how important it is that we carry out this public access work.”

At issue was what was thought to be a public road through private land south of Prineville in the Crooked River drainage that provided access to the southern end of Ochoco National Forest. RMEF provided title work and research that showed continuous public use of the road since the late 1800s.

Waibel Ranches, LLC facilitated the construction of the new road at their own expense and at their own initiative. They did so in order to provide access to the same public lands as a means to reduce the liability, trespass, poaching and littering associated with public travel along the old Teaters Road.

“It’s great to have a partner like RMEF to help find solutions to public land access issues,” said Dennis Teitzel, Prineville BLM district manager.

“This project provides access for hunters and all others that could have been lost without the cooperation and efforts of several organizations. The landowners should be thanked for their willingness to work to solve a problem for the benefit for all,” said Richard Nelson, OHA Bend Chapter past president. “It shows what can be accomplished when all work on a solution instead of locking in to an adversary position.”

Since 1986, RMEF and its partners completed 875 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Oregon with a combined value of more than $57.4 million. These projects protected or enhanced 793,317 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 90,073 acres.

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Wildlife Habitat Permanently Protected in Colorado

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation teamed up with conservation-minded landowners and Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) to permanently protect 1,742 acres of prime elk and greater sage grouse habitat in northwest Colorado. The project also improves public hunting in a limited draw unit.

“We appreciate landowners who look outside of themselves and recognize the vital importance of protecting their land,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Protecting this property will maintain its wildlife, agricultural and habitat values while also benefitting nearby public lands.”

The tract is nearly surrounded by public lands. It is also adjacent to the Diamond Breaks Wilderness Study Area and just a few miles away from Dinosaur National Monument and Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge.

“Projects like this protect migration corridors and enhance the connectivity of wildlife habitat. In this particular case, more than 238,000 acres of landscape are now knitted together for the benefit of wildlife and its habitat,” added Henning.

Located in the Pot Creek and Dry Creek watersheds, tributaries of the Green River, the property is key summer and winter range for big game and home to more than 500 elk as well as mule deer and other bird and animal life. It is also core greater sage grouse range and lies within a two-mile radius of leks in both Colorado and Utah, one of which contains more than 60 males.

Though the conservation easement is on private property, the landowner granted a public access easement to CPW allowing public elk hunts every year going forward in the highly limited draw unit of Game Management Unit 1.

“CPW will manage the hunts and public hunters will be allowed to access the landlocked BLM-administered lands,” said Bill de Vergie, CPW’s area wildlife manager from Meeker. “This is very beneficial for wildlife and our sportsmen and I’m glad to see it happen.”

The landowner previously placed a RMEF conservation easement on a 796-acre plot of adjacent ranch land immediately across the border in Utah.

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RMEF Project Protects Montana Elk Habitat, Expands Public Access

*Editor’s Note* – Perhaps because the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation transferred this land to the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks – land that abuts the Federal Government – the feds won’t have to stage a murder and lock innocent people in jail, in order to take the land away from the state when the Feds decide they need it. I also have to wonder if any of this land is rich in minerals, minerals that Hillary Clinton has already given to the Russians in exchange for billions of dollars that will go to the Clinton Foundation.

One DOES have to wonder about such things these days. RMEF should tread lightly, unless, of course, they are in on the conspiracy.

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—Located in the heart of elk winter range in Montana’s Madison Valley, the Madison-Wall Creek Wildlife Management Area (WMA) is now approximately 10 percent larger thanks to a land transfer from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP).

“This is a tremendously unique project because we not only protected and conserved important elk habitat but actually improved it after removing a 3,000-square-foot home from the site,” said Blake Henning, RMEF vice president of Lands and Conservation. “This is a classic example of a trophy house in the wrong spot. It was an intrusion on elk winter range but through creativity and partnership, we removed it and left behind open habitat for elk and other wildlife in perpetuity.”

In late 2014, RMEF acquired 631 acres of grassy rangeland 24 miles south of Ennis immediately adjacent to the WMA. The entire southern edge of the property borders the existing WMA while the eastern edge borders Bureau of Land Management land that runs clear to the Madison River.

RMEF recently conveyed the property to FWP.

“This is such an exciting addition to Wall Creek considering everything and everyone that benefit,” said Julie Cunningham, FWP area biologist. “First you have the 2,000 elk that use the WMA as crucial winter range, then the hundreds of mule deer and antelope that migrate through and – of course – the hunters who will now have access to hundreds more acres of huntable public land.”

RMEF oversaw a bidding process in 2015 that led to the removal of the house from the premises. FWP will use the remaining structures for management and administration purposes. The actual home site will be reseeded and a small man-made pond will be reclaimed.

In addition to preventing subdivision, the transaction improves and enhances public access to the now 7,188-acre WMA. It also expands hunting and fishing recreational opportunities, further protects the Madison River watershed, and allows for more elk tolerance by helping to prevent game damage issues.

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More Than Half-Million Square Miles of Land “Protected”

“Since 2012, more than half a million square miles of land have come under protection. Now more than 15 percent of terrestrial and inland water areas around the globe are under protection, toward a United Nations target of 17 percent by 2020, according to a recent report by the UN Environment Program (UNEP).”<<<Read More>>>

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If I Owned the Woods

Suppose I bought all the woods and hills around a thriving valley where farms and ranches abounded and town families prospered from a mix of agricultural support and several small industrial businesses. Suppose further that all the former owners from whom I had bought the land had been considered part of the greater valley community for generations.

What if I:
– Went to court and closed every road through my property that I could?

– Vegetated every closed road so that travel through my property by anyone from hunters to firefighters was impossible?

– Eliminated all grazing and timber cutting on my property?

– Closed my property to hunting, fishing, and trapping and any access?

– Refused to clean up downed timber after a big storm?

– Refused to spray insect-infested trees, or to remove dead ones?

– Brought cougars, wolves, and grizzly bears onto my property and released them?

– Refused to accept any responsibility for human injuries or dead animals resulting from MY predators?

– Made firefighting access and water availability to fight fires that started on my property unavailable UNLESS the valley residents bought ME airplanes and hired many new employees to work FOR ME when they weren’t fighting MY FIRES that could spread to the valley?

– Went to court and obtained a judgment that because I was not commercial and was considered a charitable, scientific entity that Local and State governments not only could not tell me what to do on my property, they and my neighbors would have to accept any impacts my land use practices imposed on them?

Well, of course:
– Sawmills would close because timber harvests that had gone on for generations ceased.

– Sawyers, like ranch-hands, would become unemployed as timber cutting and grazing acreages disappeared.

– Ranches would steadily dwindle in herd size and then in numbers as forage availability dwindled.

– Farms would dwindle as part-time work in the valley and in The Woods disappeared.

– Businesses would dwindle and disappear as transportation into and out of the valley was constricted.

– Real estate values would plummet as farm land became unprofitable and town homes lacked for buyers since there was no work available and predator problems even in town became endemic. Insurance rates skyrocketed since predator damage was the sole responsibility of the unfortunate citizens damaged in any way.

– Hunting, fishing and trapping disappeared. Businesses for guiding, housing and feeding such folks also dried up as access disappeared and predators both reduced game and posed deadly threats to visitors, children, and others considering outdoor activities.

– Local government and State government revenue of all sorts fell precipitously while demands for government “help” skyrocketed. My land went untaxed since it was “devoted to a higher ideal”, businesses closed up, agriculture dwindled, families moved away or went on welfare, and vacant and “foreclosed” home sites proliferated.

As all this went on, I became more powerful. I bought up parcels all over the valley. While I closed them to any use by local people, I bought, or rented at a discount, properties that would further close roads and pinch off increasingly isolated private property of former ranchers and farmers and long-time residents of the valley. Local government did only what I ALLOWED and I stacked the State Legislature with the best politicians that MY MONEY COULD BUY!

QUESTION: Who am I?
No, I am not Henry Potter. You remember him don’t you? Lionel Barrymore played him in “It’s a Wonderful Life”. He was the evil old cuss that made everyone poor and created that gloomy town where James Stewart (George Bailey) contemplated suicide until the angel showed him how important he (and really EACH OF US is) was to his community.

No, I am not some media mogul or Hollywood gazillionaire buying up rural land and then imposing urban standards and fantasies or rural communities.

I AM UNCLE SAM!

I am the US Forest Service. I am the National Park Service. I am the Bureau of Land Management. I am the US Fish & Wildlife Service. I control over 40% of the United States.

I am steadily eliminating all sustainable uses and management of RENEWABLE natural resources on MY LAND. I am eliminating roads and access on MY LAND. I am ignoring enormous fire-fuel accumulations resulting from Wilderness, Parks, storm damage, Roadless Areas, insect damage. I am closing access and roads everywhere to impede firefighting and public access. I am demanding that already-impoverished taxpayers give me more firefighters and expensive equipment to appear to be fighting fires of increasing magnitude and frequency. I accept NO RESPONSIBILITY (exactly as I have established the legal precedence for damage from the wolves and grizzly bears THAT I INTRODUCED AND SPREAD) for fire damage to residences, towns, and businesses resulting from fires STARTED AS A RESULT OF MY ACTIONS AND INACTIONS ON MY PROPERTY! I have spent over 40 years establishing legal precedents that say State and Local governments cannot tell me what to do or not do on MY PROPERTY. I have financially and professionally seduced State bureaucrats and State politicians to become my secret mistresses for whatever I want to do. I put millions of rural employees and thousands of rural businesses out of work and then vow to “reduce unemployment” and “support small businesses”. I pay no taxes and renege on promises to “replace lost taxes and share revenue with State and Local government”. I breed and release wolves on MY PROPERTY to infest State and private “neighbors” and do likewise with even more deadly and destructive grizzly bears and, like Henry Potter, despise and ridicule the ignorant bumpkins he evicts into the snow.

Uncle Sam has exceeded the slumlord Henry Potter in arrogance and evil. I suggest that when they make the movie one day, they consider cutting and pasting Spencer Tracy from the movie “Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde”. The 4 federal agencies cited above go about like Dr. Jekyl daily making scientific pronouncements and seeming good; while in truth killing and spreading evil nightly before reassuming the sweet appearance of a do-gooder.

Jim Beers
20 August 2012
If you found this worthwhile, please share it with others. Thanks.

Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC. He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands. He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC. He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority. He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.

Jim Beers is available to speak or for consulting. You can receive future articles by sending a request with your e-mail address to: jimbeers7@comcast.net

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EPA Takes Land Away From Wyoming

“I understand that the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribes have a different opinion about the Wind River Reservation Boundary. My deep concern is about an administrative agency of the federal government altering a state’s boundary and going against over 100 years of history and law.

“This should be a concern to all citizens because, if the EPA can unilaterally take land away from a state, where will it stop?” Governor Matt Mead said in a press release on January 6.<<<Read More>>>

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RMEF, Landowner Team Up to Conserve 6,000 Acres of Utah Elk Country

MISSOULA, Mont.–The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation successfully worked with a conservation-minded landowner and the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) to permanently protect 6,446 acres of elk habitat in northeast Utah.

“We cannot give enough thanks to the Barber family and their partner, Carrus Land Systems, for putting their vision of land and wildlife conservation into action,” said Blake Henning, RMEF vice president of Lands and Conservation. “This donated conservation easement shows the Barber’s commitment to conserve scenic landscape values, crucial year-round habitat for a wide array of wildlife and maintain the ability of some species to more easily migrate to nearby public lands.”

“They came in with a very conservation-minded attitude. It’s really refreshing to work with landowners like that,” said Scott Walker, DWR regional biologist. “That area is so stinking developable. It’s close enough to the Wasatch Front. They could easily have flipped it and put summer homes all across it. This is a huge win for wildlife.” Located approximately 35 miles southeast of Logan in Rich County, the property ranges in elevation from 7,200 to 8,200 feet and features flat to rolling terrain with steep draws and lateral ridges. It abuts Bureau of Land Management land to the north and east, and the Cache National Forest to the west. The property offers forage, water and cover for more than 300 elk during the winter, fall and spring. It is also home to deer, antelope, sage grouse and moose. Five miles of Birch Creek, as well as several other creeks and seasonal drainages, wind through the property offering prime riparian habitat for Bonneville cutthroat trout.

“The Barber family remains committed to seeing the property remain a working ranch with quality range, but they also teamed with other ranches several years ago to create the Strawberry Ridge Cooperative Wildlife Management Unit,” added Henning. “That means the DWR offers public big game tags for the ranchers to use themselves or sell in exchange for providing free access for public hunters.”

To date, RMEF and its partners completed more than 400 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Utah positively affecting more than 910,000 acres.

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Environmentalism, Tyrannical Government Destroys Business and Family Lives

wake-up-america

Here’s the story of a family that finally gave up trying to fight the government-backed environmental movement and will lose their business, family farm and put 31 working people out of jobs, etc.

As Americans we often turn a blind eye to this sort of totalitarian government-backed events, passing them off for unknown reasons mostly. It’s very unfortunate that people don’t wake up and realize that when it happens to them, and it will, it’s too late.

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