May 23, 2019

Idaho Draft Wolf Plan

It’s been nearly 30 years since wolves were illegally and maliciously released into the woods of the Northern Rocky Mountains including Central Idaho. Evidently, in that 30 years, Idaho wolf managers have learned nothing and will likely continue with the proliferation of mostly uncontrolled numbers of wolves believing they can offer “recreational opportunities” and magically mitigate any problems with livestock depredations.

Idaho has reached a benchmark time in which, after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) illegally forced wolves onto Idaho against their wills, they are basically finishing up turning over the cost of that management to the citizens of Idaho. They must devise a plan satisfactory to the USFWS. Even though the USFWS has set minimum numbers of wolves the state must maintain – or else the fascist government will place wolves back on the Endangered Species Act list – Idaho appears to have no plan but to not only keep the 800-850 wolves (wink, wink) but to continue to grow the numbers.

Below is an outline of the draft for a new wolf management plan. I have been told that not included in this draft plan is a set number of wolves in which the department intends to target as a maximum number. As was pointed out, how can an honest plan be legitimate without specific target goals?

The person sending this email has suggested that all residents contact their fish and game commissioner and tell them what they expect.

IdahoWolfPlan

 

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Statement Concerning the Establishment of a Bison Management Plan for Grand Canyon National Park

STATEMENT OF VICTOR KNOX, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, PARK PLANNING, FACILITIES AND LANDS, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, BEFORE THE SENATE SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL PARKS, COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES, CONCERNING S. 782, TO DIRECT THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR TO ESTABLISH A BISON MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK.

June 10, 2015

Mr. Chairman and members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to present the views of the Department of the Interior on S. 782, a bill to direct the Secretary of the Interior to establish a bison management plan for Grand Canyon National Park.

The Department opposes S. 782 because it would disrupt an ongoing planning effort for managing bison at Grand Canyon National Park, and may cause confusion about the National Park Service’s existing authorities to manage wildlife populations through a variety of means, including the use of skilled volunteers.<<<Read the Rest>>>

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Laughable: Judge Molloy, “Reluctant to Second Guess” USFWS

“BILLINGS — A federal judge on Wednesday set a 2018 deadline for the government to complete a long-delayed recovery plan for imperiled Canada lynx in the Lower 48 states.

Wildlife advocates had asked U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy to push the government into faster action on the snow-loving big cats, which were added to the list of threatened species in 2000.

But after federal officials said budget issues and competing priorities were slowing their work, Molloy indicated Wednesday in an order that he was reluctant to second-guess them. He said the January 2018 deadline proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was reasonable.”<<<Read More>>>

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