June 16, 2019

Final Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, First Revision

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of our Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, First Revision (Recovery Plan). The Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) is listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA), and is currently found in the U.S. States of Arizona and New Mexico, and in Chihuahua, Mexico. The recovery plan includes specific recovery criteria to be met to enable us to remove this species from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. The first Mexican wolf recovery plan was completed in 1982. ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of the recovery plan from our Web site at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/recovery-plans.html or the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Web site at https://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/.

Background A primary goal of our endangered species program and the Endangered Species Act (ESA) (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) is recovering endangered or threatened animals and plants to the point they are again secure, viable ecosystem members. Recovery means improving listed species’ status to the point at which they no longer meet the definition of threatened or endangered and listing is no longer appropriate under the criteria set out in in section 4(a)(1) of the ESA. The ESA requires developing recovery plans for listed species, unless such a plan would not promote a particular species’ conservation.

The Service has revised its approach to recovery planning; the revised process is called Recovery Planning and Implementation (RPI). The RPI process is intended to reduce the time needed to develop and implement recovery plans, increase recovery plan relevancy over a longer timeframe, and add flexibility to recovery plans so they can be adjusted to new information or circumstances. Under RPI, a recovery plan will include statutorily required elements (measurable criteria, site-specific management actions, and estimates of time and costs), along with a concise introduction and our strategy for how we plan to achieve species recovery. The RPI recovery plan is supported by a separate Species Status Assessment, or in some cases, a species biological report that provides the background information and threat assessment, which are key to recovery plan development. The essential component to flexible implementation under RPI is producing a separate working document called the Recovery Implementation Strategy (implementation strategy). The implementation strategy steps down from the more general description of actions described in the recovery plan to detail the specific, near-term activities needed to implement the recovery plan. The implementation strategy will be adaptable by being able to incorporate new information without having to concurrently revise the recovery plan, unless changes to statutory elements are required.

The Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, First Revision, represents one of the first products the Service has developed using RPI. On June 30, 2017, the Service made the draft Recovery Plan available for a 60-day public comment period during which we received more than 100,000 comments (82 FR 29918). The public comments and additional materials related to the Recovery Plan are available for public review online at http://www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FWS-R2-ES-2017-0036.

In addition to the recovery plan and implementation strategy, we completed a Biological Report describing the Mexican wolf’s current status. The Biological Report supports the recovery plan by providing the background, life-history, and threat assessment information. The Biological Report and Recovery Plan were independently peer-reviewed by scientists outside of the Service. As with the implementation strategy, we will update the Biological Report as new species status information becomes available.

Recovery Plan Strategy

The overall strategy for recovering the Mexican wolf focuses on improving the two populations’ resilience (i.e., population size) and genetic representation, one focused south of Interstate 40 in Arizona and New Mexico in the United States, and one focused in the northern portion of the Sierra Madre Occidental in Mexico, across an adequate ecological and geographic range of representation within each population. The strategy involves carefully managing the captive- breeding program, releasing Mexican wolves from the captive-breeding program into the wild, and translocating Mexican wolves from the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area in portions of New Mexico and Arizona to Mexico, to ensure two genetically and demographically viable populations are extant in the wild for redundancy.

Another key component of the strategy includes working with Federal, State, Tribal, local partners, and the public, to improve Mexican wolf tolerance on the landscape.

Authority: We developed our recovery plan and publish this notice under the authority of the Endangered Species Act, section 4(f), 16 U.S.C. 1533(f).

Dated: October 24, 2017.

Amy Lueders, Regional Director, Southwest Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2017-26041 Filed 12-1-17; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333-15-P

 

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Utah officials: Mexican wolf is ‘bullet’ that could destroy West

*Editor’s Note* – It is certainly a rigged system – a system, just as stated, to achieve desired outcomes. Officials hide behind the belief that the Endangered Species Act REQUIRES them to do what they are doing. That is a dishonest statement. Perhaps the ESA requires plans for recovery but those plans should never include fraud and deception to accomplish political goals.

History has taught us nothing, evidently. I wrote extensively in “Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?” about this rigged system and how lies and more lies were thrust upon the American people in order to manipulate public opinion in favor of dishonest and illegal wolf introduction. Here we are, over 20 years past, and the lying bastards are still filling people full of it.

Leaders in Utah, as well as Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona, are attacking the credibility of FWS’s science, alleging it is rigged to improperly include the Four Corners region in the recovery zone for this critically imperiled wolf subspecies. The states also object to the venue for next week’s meeting because it is has hosted meetings of conservation groups.

Source: Utah officials: Mexican wolf is ‘bullet’ that could destroy West | The Salt Lake Tribune

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Guest Column: Wolf expansion has ranchers worried about their livelihoods

Recent decisions by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to expand the number of Mexican wolves and the area the wolves are allowed to roam, has Greenlee County ranchers extremely worried. Wolves will now be allowed to roam freely across all of Greenlee County and about two-thirds of both Arizona and New Mexico.

Source: Guest Column: Wolf expansion has ranchers worried about their livelihoods – Eastern Arizona Courier: Opinion

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Ranchers in Catron County worry about wolf-coyote hybrids 

Folks in Catron County are worried about a new aggressive predator turning up their community: A wolf-coyote hybrid.
Source: Ranchers in Catron County worry about wolf-coyote hybrids | KOB.com

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Cross-Fostering Wolves: When Bad Becomes Good

WolfPups2Below is a press release offered by the Arizona Game and Fish Department. It actually baffles this tiny mind of mine. The press release is designed for the general public that knows nothing about wolf breeding programs, wolf introduction, etc. All the public knows is that there are either wolves or there aren’t wolves, i.e. they love or hate the idea.

There’s tons missing from this presser. For instance, it basically tells anyone (rarely anyone), who gets this release, that efforts are underway to increase the number and viability of wolves in the desert Southwest. They kind of side-step the process and completely fail to inform anybody about the genetics of raising mongrel dog/wolves in captivity so somebody can rush the little puppies out into the woods, sticking them in another wolf den, crossing their fingers, and hoping for the best.

I’ll spare readers of any rants about perversion and real government efforts to destroy the rights of humans. Consider, however, the hypocrisy that exists when it comes to wildlife management, even at its simplest levels.

The majority of those who support wolf/cross-bred mutt introduction, believe that wolves are some kind of magical, god-like creature that is so important for their long, sought-after balance of nature – a myth. These seriously misled and perverted wolf adorers, while thinking nothing of stooping to the severity of destroying an actual wolf subspecies at the hands of dumbing down DNA requirements for a pure wolf, raising cross-bred dogs as “wolves” and whisking the puppies away in hopes some unsuspecting bitch will raise them as pseudo “wild dogs” is beyond comprehension.

The envelope is being pushed in just how far man should go in wildlife management, and these wolf lovers support this action, but refuse to support any less radical management efforts to protect other species.

Does anybody find it odd and disturbing that history, through fact and folklore, never paints the image of a wolf in any light other than that of death, destruction and evil, and this modern American society, not only promotes that nasty wolves be forced into our back yards, be are now seeing the wolf as god-like – their answer to all that troubles them?

The Bible tells us that in the Last Days, events like this would happen; that down becomes up, that wrong becomes right, that dark becomes light, and, evidently, wolves become a savior.

Press Release from the Arizona Game and Fish Department:

For immediate release, May 4, 2015

Mexican wolf biologists remain vigilant for cross-fostering opportunity
Technique promises to improve genetics of wild population

PHOENIX — The Mexican Wolf Interagency Field Team (IFT) is observing from a distance the potential denning behavior of Mexican wolf packs in the wild looking for a cross-fostering opportunity. Cross-fostering is a technique to move very young pups from one litter into a different, similar-age wild litter with the hope that the receiving pack will raise them as their own. Cross-fostering is undertaken to introduce genetically-desirable pups into the litter of an experienced female and wild-proven pack.

Last year, two pups were successfully cross-fostered from a wild, but inexperienced female, into the den of the proven Dark Canyon pack in New Mexico – a first for the Mexican wolf recovery program. A key to cross-fostering is timing. Donor pups and the litter of a receiving female must be whelped within days of each other.
This year, that requires close coordination between captive rearing facilities in the binational Species Survival Plan rearing facilities and packs in the wild.

The IFT will be looking for opportunities to cross-foster wolf pups in the Apache National Forest between now and May 30. In particular the IFT will be trying to cross-foster wolves into the Bluestem and Maverick packs due to the packs’ proven ability to successfully rear pups.

The 2014 Mexican wolf population survey results announced in February showed a minimum of 109 wolves in the wild, up from 83 the previous year.

The reintroduction is a collaborative effort of the Service, Arizona Game and Fish Department, White Mountain Apache Tribe, USDA Forest Service, USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service – Wildlife Services, and several participating counties in Arizona.

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Wolf Meeting and Talking Points Expanded Boundary

All content comes from an email source:

Wolf meeting tomorrow, 8-13-14 at the TorC civic center. Public input meeting at 6 PM; information session from fish nd wildlife service at 2 PM. [This is]About the new proposed draft rule and Environmental Impact Statement the rule is based on. Please come and speak if you can. Map and short zone explanation attached. Talking points attached.

Designate three wolf management zones with a larger Zone 1 within the expanded MWEPA:
• Zone 1 is an area within the MWEPA where Mexican wolves would be allowed to occupy and where wolves may be initially released or translocated. Zone 1 would include all of the Apache and Gila National Forests (the existing BRWRA) and any or all of the Sitgreaves National Forests; the Payson, Pleasant Valley, andTonto Basin Ranger Districts of the Tonto National Forest; and the Magdalena Ranger District of the Cibola National Forest.
• Zone 2 is an area within the MWEPA where Mexican wolves would be allowed to naturally disperse into and occupy and where wolves may be translocated. In Zone 2 initial releases of wolves on Federal land would be limited to pups less than five months old. Pups less than five months old, juvenile wolves and adult wolves could also be initially released on private land under Service and state approved management agreements with private landowners and on tribal land under Service approved management agreements with tribal governments.Zone 2 would include the area of the MWEPA not included in Zone 1or 3 south of I-40 to the international border with Mexico
• Zone 3 is an area where Mexican wolves would be allowed to naturally disperse into and occupy but where neither initial releases nor translocations would occur. Zone 3 would include the area of the MWEPA not included in Zone1 or 2 south of I-40 to the international border with Mexico.

ZoningMap

Mexican wolf Draft EIS and Rule Change

Talking points for Agriculture

1. Any population change in the wolf recovery program must be based on a recovery plan that has been published in the federal register and vetted by the public . The most recent recovery plan in place meeting those requirements is the 1982 plan. None of the ongoing attempts at recent planning have been subject to peer review in accordance with 59 Fed. Reg. 34207 July 1 1994

2. Recovery planning needs a defined number of wolves to allow the public to understand clearly the objectives of the recovery of Mexican wolves in the SW.

3. Livestock on federally administered grazing allotments are private property legally occupying the range to disallow take of wolves attacking livestock is wrong. Ranchers should be allowed to defend and protect their domestic animals regardless of land ownership, without having to beg for a permit.

4. FWS isn’t using best available science or information in the DEIS. Nowhere is there a requirement that county data and reports must be peer reviewed to be used by the agency in rulemaking. Thus far FWS has cited no data to support the finding of no significant impact to livestock community by this program, nor the harm that has been documented to the human element particularly the children in areas where wolves are present.

5. FWS failed to mitigate livestock depredation and ranch sales due to wolf depredation in wolf occupied areas. nothing in their draft suggests they will do so this time.

6. FWS has failed to mitigate the impacts to children in wolf populated areas, in fact have largely ignored the habituation problem of these wolves. There is very little in the DEIS and Draft Rule that allows for mitigation of these significant problems.

7. FWS has failed to consider cumulative effect of economic losses and social impacts when this program is coupled with all the other environmental planning that is going on in our state.

8. FWS has failed to address catastrophic affects on wolf habitat.

9. Cooperative agreements with private landowners to host wolves on private land can and likely will have significant impact on neighboring ranches domestic animals and the human element on adjacent private lands, this should not be available.

10. FWS must stay within the bounds of the DEIS and draft Rule, during the last rulemaking process, David Parsons significantly changed the draft rule and EIS and there was no public vetting of his teams decision-making. This DEIS cannot be significantly altered other than to incorporate ongoing comments in the current commenting cycle. Parsons now works for an environmental organization devoted to preserving predators.

Remember, DOW CBD WEG Sierra Club and all the other environmental and animal rights organizations, will be bussing in people to speak, crowding the comment session and complicating this meeting with public grandstandings perhaps even a howl in like they did in Albuquerque last year. It got them a cover on the Albuquerque Journal. If you are up to a little public grandstanding to ensure the media gets our side of the story feel free to do so, I have protest signs and we can stage a protest ourselves if necessary.

Public comment session, stick to realistic points similar to but not limited to those above, and the injustice and unfairness behind the management of the program.

There is no, No Wolves alternative, this program is far far beyond that issue the reality is, the courts have ruled this is legitimate. Even if there was a No Wolves alternative, and it was chosen, the population explosion we have now would allow the agency to immediately re-list this animal with full ESA status critical habitat and a no take policy under the ESA and there would be wolves out here forever with NO removals for problem animals and private property curtailment due to the critical habitat status.

Within the past year our association Gila Livestock Growers Assn. has tried to fulfill some basic scientific testing that would have allowed us the basis for petitioning for de-listing of this animal along with the de-listing of the northern population, our access to historic samples fell through and our time has run out to do it before the new rule is in place. We will have to undergo the rulemaking process and try to find historic samples for testing at a later date.

At this meeting, we have to show the agency they will not and cannot get away with pretending there is no significant impact to our communities and industries whether it’s tourism, ranching or outfitting. pick a subject stay on point ignore the hecklers. Prepare for bizarre and really bad behavior from the wolf support activists.

When I was in Albuquerque last November for the preliminary meetings someone sat next to me and handed me the prayer attached here. Please print it and take it with you if you need to.

Prayer

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Wolf Hearing in Albuquerque, NM on Wednesday

Embassy Suites Albuquerque.

Please Register and get up there 3 PM Wednesday.

Anyone ranch associated in NM or AZ needs to try and make this thing.

Pre-hearing Americans For Prosperity, prep is at 3 and Fish and Wildlife Service hearing on wolf de-listing is at 5.

thanks

Laura Schneberger

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Senator Gail Griffin to hold legislative hearing in Greenlee County on Mexican Wolf Recovery Program

October 9, 2013 (Press Release)

(Phoenix, State Capitol)—Concerned by the ongoing impact of the federal Mexican Wolf Recovery Program on the residents and ranchers of Greenlee County, State Senator Gail Griffin (R-Hereford) has announced that she will be holding a legislative hearing in Greenlee County on Saturday, October 19, from 1 pm to 3 pm at the Greenlee County Courthouse, where members of the public will be invited to share their personal stories and experiences with the wolf program.

“With federal bureaucrats proposing a massive expansion of the Mexican Wolf Program, I feel it is more important than ever for Arizona policymakers to understand how this program has impacted local residents so that we can respond to the federal government’s proposal accordingly,” said Senator Griffin.

“I look forward to meeting with Greenlee County residents face to face and hearing their stories. They have been on the front lines of this program for two decades; their voices deserve to be heard.”

Who: State Senator Gail Griffin

What: Legislative Hearing on Mexican Wolf Recovery Program

When: Saturday, October 19, 1 pm – 3 pm

Where: Greenlee County Courthouse
253 5th St., Clifton

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