November 29, 2021

Lawmakers Override Gov’s Veto of Moose Permit Bill

AUGUSTA – The Maine House and Senate have voted to override Gov. Paul LePage’s veto of a bill that would allow the commissioner of Inland Fisheries and…
Source: Lawmakers Override Gov’s Veto of Moose Permit Bill | Maine Public Broadcasting

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Moose permit increase proposal criticized at Greenville hearing

GREENVILLE, Maine – The economy of the Moosehead Lake region depends a lot more on moose watchers than moose hunters. That was the message strongly conveyed at Friday’s public hearing at Greenville Consolidated School on a proposal by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to increase the number of […]

Source: Moose permit increase proposal criticized at Greenville hearing — Outdoors — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

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Moose Hunt Hearing in Greenville

On Friday, April 24, 2015, the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) will be holding a public hearing in Greenville, Maine at 6 p.m. at the Greenville Consolidated School. The purpose of the meeting is to receive public comment on MDIFW’s proposal to issue moose hunting permits for the harvest of 100 bull moose and 50 cow (antlerless) moose. Some people in the area think that the moose population is too low to support that number of harvested moose as well as provide for successful guiding for moose watchers.

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Unfortunately, Bill to Study Impact of Ticks Moves Forward

LD134 is a proposed bill requiring the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) to:

…conduct a study of the impact of winter ticks on the State’s moose population, including identifying any problems for the moose population created by the ticks and recommending possible courses of action, if any, to address those problems.

I say that it is unfortunate the bill has been moved forward because I don’t think that it is necessary to study something that others have studied and that Maine already knows – ticks are killing moose. An ongoing moose study has revealed the number of cow and calf moose that have been killed because of winter ticks. Maine knows ticks are killing moose. So why spend the money on it? It makes little sense. But then again, today’s politicians were weened on forming study groups and spending valuable resources on anything they don’t want to deal with.

What is about as clear as mud in this proposal is that part that reads, “identifying any problems for the moose population created by the ticks and recommending possible courses of action.”

The identity of a problem with the moose population has already been established – ticks kill moose. So, what would be the course of action to stop ticks from killing moose? If the focus of this study is on whether or not ticks kill moose and if so how much, then how can any course of action be recommended to solve the problem if they don’t know what caused the problem of ticks?

Excuse me for thinking rationally and not as a friggin politician. What a waste!

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New Hampshire Will Cut Back On Moose Hunting Permits

“Declining moose population has prompted the state Department of Fish and Game to propose a reduction from 124 permits in 2014 to 105 this year. The decrease continues a precipitous drop in the number of permits since 2007, when the state issued 675.

It’s a familiar pattern seen in nearby Maine and Vermont, where the reduction in moose hunting applications have been even greater.

But those numbers don’t tell the whole story.”<<<Read More>>>

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Discrepancies in Issuance of Moose Permits

Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont have a wide discrepancy in the implementation of moose hunting permits as part of its moose management plan. Why?

Keeping in mind that animals don’t see boundaries, there are geographical and habitat availability differences between the three northern New England states. These issues and many other factors, drive the plans and decision making processes of each state’s fish and wildlife department.

However, in a news report found in the Concord Monitor, we find that each of the three states use the issuing of moose permits for moose management in different ways – very different.

Vermont sends out one hunter for every 10 moose, Maine sends out one hunter for every 23 moose, while New Hampshire sends out one hunter for every 38 moose.

These numbers are based on moose population estimates for each of the three states as follows: Vermont – 2,400; Maine – 65,000; New Hampshire – 4,000.

Without having every available data to make comparisons, these numbers provide for interesting debate over a cup of joe.

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Deadline Approaching for Maine Moose Lottery

Press Release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

The deadline to apply for the Maine Moose Lottery is fast approaching, and hunters who want the chance to hunt moose in Maine need to mail or deliver their paper application by April 1, 2015. Online applicants have until 11:59 on May 14, 2015 to apply for the moose lottery.

Online and paper applications are available at www.mefishwildlife.com. Hunters can print and mail their paper application, deliver it to IFW headquarters at 284 State Street in Augusta or can easily apply directly online.

Long-time lottery applicants who continue to apply have a better chance at winning due to changes in the lottery implemented in 2012.

Bonus points are awarded for each consecutive year the applicant has applied for the lottery since 1998 without being selected and each bonus point gives the applicant an additional chance in the drawing.

Bonus points are earned at the rate of one per year for years one to five, two per year for years six to 10, three per year for years 11 to 15 and 10 per year for years 16 and beyond.

Since 2011, applicants can skip a year and not lose their bonus points. So if they applied in 2013 but not in 2014, they still have their points available if they apply in 2015.

The moose permit drawing drawing will take place on June 13, 2015 at the Moose Festival in Bethel, Maine. To learn more about the three-day festival, please visit www.bethelmainemoosefest.com

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Maine Moose Lottery Permit Application for 2015

The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife now has their website set up for users to begin the application process to get their names entered for a, sort of random, drawing to be held in Bethel, Maine on Saturday, June 13, 2015.

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65% Of Maine Moose Hunters Successful

A Press Release from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

AUGUSTA, Maine — Despite brief warm spells during both the September and October moose seasons, 65% of all moose hunters harvested a moose last season.

With 3,095 moose permits issued, 2,022 hunters were successful in getting their moose. Hunter success rates varied throughout different regions of the state with over 80 percent of the hunters getting moose in Wildlife Management Districts 3 and 5 in Aroostook County and under 10 percent of hunters getting a moose in WMDs 23 and 25 in Waldo and Knox Counties.

The 65% success rate for hunters is lower than the 73% success rate for hunters in 2013.

“Weather certainly played a factor,” said IFW’s moose biologist Lee Kantar. “Moose tend to travel less and spend more time in cover when it’s hot. Hunter effort also declines.”

Maine’s moose season is split into three segments with six-day seasons in September, October and November. Temperatures were above 80 degrees on the first day of the season in September, and despite a cool start to the October season, warmer weather in the 70s prevailed during the middle of the October season.

“We expect to see a higher success rate in September, as moose are more receptive to calling,” said Kantar. “But in WMD 3, only 79% of the hunters were successfully in September compared to 91% in October.”

Kantar also added that there are fewer moose on the landscape than in previous years.

“Looking at the survival data from our radio-collared moose last year, we know that winter ticks during the winter of 2014 had an impact on moose,” said Kantar. “It was an impact that was likely above normal, somewhat similar in its impact to a tough winter on deer.” As a result, the department decreased the number of permits available to moose hunters.

The radio-collar moose study is just one aspect of the department’s ongoing research on Maine’s moose.

IFW is currently in its fifth year of conducting aerial surveys to estimate moose abundance and population composition (composition of male/females; adults/calves). The aerial surveys provide data used to estimate the moose population and health of the herd.

During the moose hunting season, biologists also examine teeth to determine a moose’s age, measure antler spread, monitor the number of ticks a moose carries and examine ovaries in November to determine reproductive rates.

Biologists are set to recommend moose permit numbers for the fall 2015 moose season. The number of available moose permits is based upon population numbers and the composition of the moose population in wildlife management districts, as well as the population goals and objectives for that district.

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The Moose With the Crumpled Horn

It was reported to me, along with the enclosed photograph, that during this season’s moose hunt in Maine, Kenny Brackett of Rangeley bagged this young bull moose showing the crumpled right antler.

CrumpledHorn

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