May 23, 2019

Myths of the “Eastern Puma” Shall Deceive, Even The Elect

Once again it appears many are acting as though “we’re all gonna die,” due to actions by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The USFWS announced just the other day that a Final Rule had been published that would officially declare the “Eastern Puma” extinct. This action shouldn’t have come as any surprise as it has been in the works for years with the USFWS, by law, providing every opportunity for anyone to get involved in the process and offer comments, opinions, and yes, even an occasional scientific report about the effort.

I was reading from an Online newspaper out of Connecticut about “The Story, The Myth, That Never Dies.” This is, of course, about the ongoing belief that the Eastern Cougar is alive and well. Perpetuated by these illusions are the notions that people see them everywhere; they have proof. American people, with their bred-into-them perversions about animals, want to believe, at all costs, void of even sanity, that wild animals, such as the Eastern mountain lion, are living in their backyards. Maybe it’s a desire, an uncontrolled want to have a spiritual connection with something. Why do people act this way?

When I was a young boy growing up and forced to attend Church and Sunday School several times a week, I heard spoken many things about the Bible. Even at the age of 10, I would ask myself, in a way that only a 10-year-old could ask, “Why would anybody be so stupid to do something like that?”

Here’s an example of what I mean. Often I was subjected to the book of Matthew, Chapter 24, specifically verses 24 – 26. Here it is written where Yeshuah is telling his disciples of things that will happen in the Latter Days. He tells them that there will be false Christs and false prophets, some that will “show great signs and wonders.” He also says that people will tell you to go here and go there for at these places you will find those who do “great signs and wonders,” and that they will “deceive even the elect.” “Don’t go,” He tells them. Don’t be deceived.

And yes, at 10 I asked how could anybody be so stupid. I asked myself those same questions about many prophecies in the Bible. 56 years later, I understand. With an understanding of the animal perversion of Americans, and I suppose most Westerners in general, these people want so badly to believe that when someone tells them there are wild animals in the woods that do amazing things, they blindly and willingly follow. They may never actually see these creatures but they will believe and never give it up.

If Yeshuah told us even the elect will be deceived about false prophets and false messiahs, surely many will be deceived about wild animals and pets, that do amazing things. If the love and care people show their pets and wild animals could be exchanged for love and care of the fellow man, wouldn’t the world we live in be different? Imagine if they put the same effort into getting people to know and understand the real Creator.

With all this in mind, reading the article about the ongoing myths about mountain lions and their existence gives us new meaning.

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But Where’s the Photo Showing What Dragged Off the “Coyote” Bait?

Two days ago the Bangor Daily News ran a story of how a man took a “roadkill” deer and hung it up for “coyote” bait. He set up a game camera and captured pictures of a bobcat feasting on the dead deer.

In retelling his story to the Bangor paper, the man said, “Two days later, we returned to find out the entire carcass had been dragged off by what appeared to be either a big single critter or a pack of critters, judging by the drag marks.”

Putting this all in context, this story references a previous story published in the Bangor Daily News about whether or not mountain lions are found in Maine. The man who hung the “coyote” bait and captured the photos says he believes what one wildlife biologist said about mountain lions in Maine and produced the story and pictures as a claim to support that big cats can be found in Maine…maybe.

My question is this. If this man got pictures of a bobcat chewing on a dead, hanging deer with his game camera, and he claims that “a single big critter or pack of critters” carried away the entire hanging dead deer, where are the pictures?

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Colorado Mother Fights Off Mountain Lion To Save Her Son

A Colorado woman managed to fight off a mountain lion that was attacking her 5-year-old son.

During the harrowing rescue Friday evening, she “reached into the animal’s mouth and wrested her son’s head from its jaws,” The Aspen Times reported.

Source: Colorado Mother Fights Off Mountain Lion To Save Her Son : The Two-Way : NPR

Aspen

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Mountain Lion Killed With Extra Set of Teeth … In Its Forehead!

Theoretically, it shouldn’t have been able to survive past birth. The extra teeth growing out of the mountain lion’s forehead looked like something out of a Ridley Scott film, but somehow it made it a whole year in the wilds of southastern Idaho before a hunter killed it last week.

Source: Mountain Lion Killed With Extra Set of Teeth … In Its Forehead! | | SportingClassicsDaily

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Mountain lion running wild in Springvale? Maybe

The animal sprung from a ditch with its paws outstretched in a Superman pose, touched down briefly on the pavement, then leaped to the other side of the roadway, Spaulding said.

“When it sprung from the ditch, it was airborne,” she said. “… The size of the front legs were massive. I saw that flying through the air, and I said, ‘Oh my God, that’s not a deer.’”

Source: Mountain lion running wild in Springvale? Maybe | December 28, 2015 | www.journaltribune.com | The Journal Tribune

Springvale

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Gasp! A Mountain Lion is Killed

“Long study of eco-systems show that the idea of a “balance of nature” is a myth. There are feedback loops that mostly keep everything from dying off all at once, but the process is bumpy, dynamic, and the mix of species constantly changing. Everything dies in the end. The most that can be hoped for is that offspring have been produced and survive to produce their own.”<<<Read More>>>

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Anti-Hunting Senator Takes Another Run at Nebraska Mountain Lion Ban

Despite having already suffered multiple defeats in his quest to ban mountain lion hunting in Nebraska, Senator Ernie Chambers has again surfaced with another attempt to ban the season.

With little more than a week to go in the 2014 legislative session, Senator Chambers filed a motion yesterday to yet again vote to over-ride the governor’s veto on LB 671, the mountain lion ban, despite previous attempts failing twice last week. Because the previous attempts to overturn the veto both failed, it’s up to Senate Speaker Greg Adams whether to suspend the rules to grant Senator Chamber’s another attempt.

In addition, Senator Chambers also filed his mountain lion ban language as an amendment to a bill dealing with insurance companies. Despite intense pressure from Senator Chambers, the amendment was ruled not germane to the bill. This means that the amendment was not closely related to the topic of the bill, thereby out-of-order and could not be considered.

“It’s evident that Senator Chambers is going to try every trick in the book to pass his anti-hunting agenda,” Evan Heusinkveld, USSA’s vice president of government affairs. “Senator Chambers has now turned his focus to derailing the legislative process as much as possible in an effort to force his way.”

Senator Chambers has also filed his anti-hunting amendment on 10 additional bills that are scheduled to be considered today.

“Senator Chambers’ amendment is not germane to any of those bills, either” said Heusinkveld. “Regardless, it’s clear that Senator Chambers is content to throw a wrench into the works until he gets his way. Nebraska sportsmen must be vigilant and call their senators today in opposition to this effort. Let your senators know that Nebraska sportsmen and women expect their wildlife to be managed by the professionals at the Game and Parks Commission and not by someone with an anti-hunting agenda.”

Take Action! Nebraska sportsmen should call Senate Speaker Greg Adams TODAY at (402) 471-2756 and let him know that sportsmen expect their wildlife to be managed by professionals, not anti-hunting politics. Nebraska sportsmen should also call their state senator today and ask them to stand up for sportsmen and vote against any attempt to ban the mountain lion season. To find your senator’s phone number visit the USSA Legislative Action Center.

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Mountain Lion Sighting in Winchester, Mass.

A mountain lion has been sighted in Winchester. A resident reported seeing a mountain lion in the Dunster Lane, Pepper Hill Drive neighborhood off of Ridge Street. Massachusetts Environmental Police responded and viewed the animal’s paw print and stated the tracks strongly resembled that of a mountain lion. Photos of the tracks were sent to Mass Wildlife for verification.<<<Read More>>>

WinchesterMap

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Oscar Cronk’s Mountain Lion at L.L. Bean’s Store in Freeport, Maine

*Editor’s Note:* The following report and photos were compiled by contributor Richard Paradis of Maine.

The Mountain Lion roamed the Maine woods a century ago and there are Panther Ponds and Mountains still in Maine as well as sporting camps and lakes that still use the Wabanaki name for the Eastern Cougar: Lunksoos.

A few photos of Oscar’s magnificent Mountain Lion follow:

This Mountain Lion was struck by a car and killed near New Haven, Connecticut June 2011.

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Wolves in Maine – Part VI – (Did Wolves Leave Maine and Why?)

Part I
Part II
Part III
Part IV
Part V
Part VI

In the book “Early Maine Wildlife” – Historical Accounts of Canada lynx, Moose, Mountain Lion, White-Tailed Deer, Wolverine, Wolves, and Woodland Caribou, 1603 – 1930 – by William B. Krohn and Christopher L. Hoving, as the reader progresses through the chronological order in which the book was laid out, a few things become clear in the debate about game animals and predators during this time frame.

For instance, in recent times I have heard information being passed about by biologists within the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, and others, that whitetail deer never were abundant in the northern part of the state and that moose and deer did not and could not survive together. In this claim some have said that when the deer moved north, the moose disappeared and/or when the moose were plentiful through the state, the deer were not. Accounts recorded in this book do not show that to be the case at all in my opinion when considering all written accounts. In actuality all three species of moose, deer and woodland caribou existed throughout the state together, at times very plentiful and other times not.

What does become apparent is that the proclivity of more or less game animals, i.e. caribou, moose and deer, was all dependent on the presence of wolves. What remains unsettled is when, if ever, did wolves leave the state of Maine and what was the reason for their exodus?

Most accounts in this book seem to agree that widespread and numerous packs of wolves in Maine had disappeared by the 1860s – 1870s, even though there are accounts of wolf encounters by people into the early 1900s. As is typical even to this day, hunters and trappers reported seeing wolf tracks many times and yet the continuing presence of wolves would not be acknowledged unless someone killed one and brought it out of the woods.

As an example, appearing in the Maine Sportsman, of an account in 1899, an anonymous writer says, “Thaddeus Coffron of Grand Lake Stream, claims to have seen two large gray wolves not long since on Big Lake near the mouth of Little Musquash stream. He walked up within a few yards of them, being armed only with an axe. Their tracks had been frequently seen in the vicinity previously.”

But as appears in “Forest and Stream”, we read this, “Again there are reports of wolves in Maine with their tracks followed by old wolf hunters, who ‘could not be mistaken.’ They do not bring out the trophies, however, and until they do the ordinary individual is inclined to regard their stories in the same light as that of the well-read fable.”

According to the editor of Shooting and Fishing in 1920 the last officially recorded wolf kill happened in Andover. “The report of the State Treasurer of Maine for 1895 shows that there was one wolf killed in the state during that year, for which a bounty was paid. This single specimen was killed in Andover, and is said to be the only wolf killed in Maine for many years.”

The editor further accounts that even though there may be a stray wolf killed sometime into the future, his “trustworthy sources” believe the wolf is “practically extinct” in New England.

What we don’t know for certain is why the wolf became “extinct” or “practically extinct” in Maine and New England. We have been led for decades to believe that the wolves were all shot, trapped or poisoned by man. Accounts in the book don’t seem to readily agree with this hypothesis nor does it that the caribou were killed off due to uncontrolled hunting.

As was recorded in the Maine Sportsman for the year 1900, a man who worked as a log scaler in the Penobscot region and traveled by foot as far away as 60 miles between lumber camps tells of his observations. “During the whole winter we saw no deer and but few moose, the entire absence of deer being due to the wolves with which the woods were overrun. Caribou we saw everywhere and I plainly remember that one day, coming out upon them trailing along in single file was a herd of 17 caribou.”

However, the scaler’s recall of what was once is soon become reality as he wonders where the caribou went. According to several writings in this book, deer, moose and caribou had once been reduced drastically, probably from a combination of predators and uncontrolled hunting. When the wolves disappeared, the deer and moose recovered and caribou for a time before it is believed, for whatever reasons, they just migrated out of the state. Perhaps they were simply tired of being harassed by predators, including man.

F. E. Keay writes in 1901 that wolves were the “most dreaded” of wild animals and that by their nature were found to be “ferocious and cunning” and did “incalculable” damage to livestock. In dealing with these large predators, Keay describes the effort this way: “They traveled in companies, sometimes of ten or twenty, and were caught or killed only with great difficulty.”

As I have pointed out in other parts of this review of wolves in Maine, the majority of reports all seem to agree that wolves were quite prevalent in Maine until around the year 1860, in which most also agree the wolf simply left the state with the exception of pockets of areas where some packs remained. While it is inarguable that the efforts of hunters and trappers, in conjunction with bounties being paid over 130 years and more, a sizable dent was put in Maine’s wolf population but evidence from these accounts can support the notion that this was not the cause of the final “extinction” of wolves in Maine.

While some accounts in this book of “Early Maine Wildlife” say that wolves for the most part left on their own, coinciding with a time in which many accounts tell of very little game, i.e. moose, deer and caribou, this would support the theory that large predators, like the wolf, will move into an area and essentially devoid it of prey and then move on. We seem to see that here, although several wolves and packs remained behind until the late 1800s when “trustworthy sources” declared the wolf “practically extinct”.

In having a better grasp of more recent coyote/wolf history in Maine, we discovered that it was not long after the wolf had become “practically extinct” that what was called the eastern coyote began populating the region. I recall in the 1960s seeing a stuffed eastern coyote that had been killed in Maine. This version of coyote was approximately 30 pounds in weight. This is a far cry from the more abundant sizes of coyotes now present in Maine, commonly reaching 50 -70 pounds in size.

It has been determined that what roams today’s forests in Maine and are commonly referred to as coyotes, are actually some concocted conglomeration of mixed breeds of wolf, coyotes, and domestic dog. It became common knowledge after the influx of eastern coyote into Maine that this varmint, perhaps because of a very small migrating population, interbred with “wild” dogs or domesticated dogs left to run unrestrained. No one is sure of how the wolf mix got into these animals.

It has been theorized that what was once called the gray wolf in Eastern Quebec, Canada, began migrating or random scatterings of these wolves, entered northern Maine and as such resulted in the inbreeding of the already inbred coyote/dog.

Considering the evidence provided in “Early Maine Wildlife” one has to honestly consider that given the relatively short period of time from when “trustworthy sources” declared the wolf in Maine “practically extinct”, that some of those earlier wolves remained behind and began breeding with the migrating coyotes.

It would be intellectually dishonest not to consider all the facts in educating ourselves to the changes of wildlife, including predators and large game animals and use them to better be able to effectively manage these species. It is reasonable to consider that man’s efforts to eradicate, – and make no bones about it, that was their intent – was not wholly what drove wolves out of Maine. If this is the case, then it would be beneficial to gain facts and knowledge to understand what events total caused this to happen.

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