June 22, 2017

When Man Wasn’t Around Animals Survived

*Editor’s Note* – A New Hampshire town wants to better manage wildlife on town property – just in excess of 2,500 acres. It is believed too many coyotes are reducing the deer population below numbers desired. As is often the case, animal lovers seem to think managing is more cruel than the savagery of letting “Nature” do it alone. Ignorance driven by emotion.

“Why fool with Mother Nature?” asked Elliot, adding that he’s read that trapping is considered inhumane. “What happened years ago when we weren’t around? They (the animals) all survived.”<<<Read More>>>

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New Hampshire Down to Just 51 Moose Permits

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department proposes issuing 51 moose hunt lottery permits this year, the lowest number since the state started its current system in 1988.

Permits have declined in recent years, partly because of the impact of parasites, both winter tick and brainworm, on the moose population. Last year, 71 lottery permits were issued.<<<Read More>>>

 

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Predator Hunting in Maine Has Caused the Deer Population to “Thrive?”

A report filed with the Portland Press Herald about Northern New England’s plans to issue more permits to kill antlerless deer to control the deer herds, states that: “Hunting of predators, like coyotes, has also helped deer thrive. Maine’s hunting season for coyotes is open year-round, unlike the seasons for deer, moose and bears, which are short and restricted.”

I think it would be responsible for the newspaper to produce some data to support that claim. While there have been pockets of effort to work toward the control of coyotes/wolves, I have serious doubts that any of that effort can honestly be translated into, “has also helped the deer thrive” and thus contribute in any way toward the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife’s notion that portions of Maine have too many deer due to ONE mild winter.

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Societal Emotions and Ignorance Rule New Hampshire Fish and Game Management

Emotional idiots, who cannot see their own destructive ways, fueled by ignorance and hatred took over wildlife management at the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, saying hunting and or trapping of 50 bobcats, out of 1,400 was a dangerous thing to do for a “recovering” population of bobcats. Even members of the New Hampshire Game Commission cited the call for a 50-cat hunt, “was not in the financial best interest of the public.” Where’s the science in all of this?

Unfortunately, the media, as might be predicted, presented a one-sided report loaded with all the emotional clap-trap from those controlled by perverted animal emotions, that can’t see the wildlife destruction they promote. “a committee member, said having a bobcat season would breach the endangered species act by putting Canada lynx, a threatened species, at risk of being hunted because the two cats have the same habitats.” I wonder if this committee member ever considered the damage too many bobcats will do to protected Canada lynx? Idiots like this worry about whether or not a lynx might get chased by a hunting dog but never consider such things as competition of prey species. A bobcat, with a greater diversity of prey selection for survival than the lynx, will be around longer than the lynx. The lynx, a cat with a preference for snowshoe hare, will stay or go depending on the availability of the rabbit. What happens to the lynx when the growing number of bobcats eat up all the snowshoe hare? Duh!

Also consider the nonsense to reject a bobcat hunting season because it was not “in the financial best interest of the public.” Sporting a third grade education, on average, of the Legislative committee, all they were capable of calculating was the cost of a bobcat permit and the cost to implement the hunt. Beyond their ability to comprehend, evidently, is what it is going to cost the department, and in extension the public, to continue to allow an exploding bobcat population to further destroy and/or prevent recovery of the Canada lynx, among other things. Obviously never considered is the fact that bobcats prey on deer, in particular deer fawns. They also will kill moose calves. If the bobcat population is allowed to grow, it surely means a serious reduction to a deer herd that is not actually in abundance now. What will this cost the public? Is this in the best financial interest of the public? New Hampshire is concerned about the moose herd. The same idiots wanting to protect the bobcat, at the expense of other species, blame the loss of moose to climate change. There’s no end to the idiocy that rules the day.

The bottom line in all of this is that wildlife management is a scientific endeavor and should be administered as a real and solid scientific process, not one that is overtaken by environmentalists and animal rights perverts who know nothing of the realities of wildlife.

Because of very poor reporting in the article linked to above, readers didn’t get a chance to hear from any of the biologists within the Department of Fish and Game to discover what the reasons were that they proposed a hunt to begin with. Surely it wasn’t a money-making proposal.

BobcatWheee

 

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Ticks Cause of New Hampshire Moose Deaths

But, people calling themselves biologists insist on using non scientific, nonsense about man-caused global warming to explain increased numbers of ticks.

A New Hampshire Fish and Game biologist is encouraging Granite State moose lovers to get involved in the fight against climate change so the species can continue to live here.

According to Kristine Rines, warm winters are causing parasites to decimate the moose population. In response, Fish and Game is considering cutting the number of available moose permits.

I wonder if these people even understand that there is a difference between weather and climate? The average Joe looks out the window and sees little snow and experiences temperatures this winter as being above normal. Because of brainwashing, they think what they are seeing is something called “global warming” – a political ruse designed to steal tax dollars and control human masses.

There is no real scientific evidence to support man-caused climate change. In reality, real science is showing that we are in a cooling trend and that trend may continue for several more years. This comes on the heels of a decade of warming. The weather outside today has little to do with climate change.

I also wonder if any of these scientists have actually done any research on the winter tick, or do they just echo the lies being fed to them that snow and cold will kill the tick? It is repeated, like a broken record, that to ease the mortality of moose (because environmentalists, anti-hunters, moose watchers, and brainwashed “biologists” think tons of moose for everyone to see from their vehicles is good) we need to have longer, colder, snowier winters. The duration of cold and the amount of cold is nearly impossible to achieve anywhere in the lower 48 states.

There are few scientific studies on the winter tick. Most of what exists is nothing but repeated theories perpetuated by environmentalist in order to further instill fear in people over a fake crisis called global warming/climate change. However, what studies that do exist, tell us that winter ticks have been around for a long time and are widespread, to exist in climates as warm as Texas and as cold as the Yukon.

The repeated myth that cold, snowy winters will kill the ticks and thus allow the populations of moose to grow, is not supported scientifically. Winter Ticks on Moose and Other Ungulates: Factors Influencing Their Population Size – William M. Samuel and Dwight A. Welch, tells us that there is not scientific evidence to indicate that the winter ticks alone kill moose. It is the existence of circumstances, combined with the existence of ticks and their quantities, that contribute to moose mortality.

Biologists and others cry out for the need of cold and snowy weather, when, in actuality, they may be seeking a death wish for the moose. Tick-infested moose, the result being loss of protective hair and anemia, are extremely susceptible to severe cold, especially the later in the winter it appears.

Samuel and Welch tell us also that in order for cold weather to have a negative effect on the winter ticks you need 6 consecutive days in which the temperature does not exceed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit. We simply don’t realize or refuse to learn that these ticks are extremely hardy and resilient. There are other weather related conditions that can be more effective in reducing tick infestation of moose.

We are told that in late summer, these ticks begin climbing vegetation. When a moose walks by, the ticks attach themselves to the moose for the long winter ride. The study showed that during this vegetation climb, if windy weather persists, the wind easily knocks the tick off the vegetation and then they must begin the long arduous climb back up the vegetation. If this persists, it can greatly reduce the number of ticks that get on the backs of moose.

What is almost never discussed when talking about ticks is that in order for the tick to survive, it needs a blood meal host, i.e. the moose. This tick does cling to other animals but moose are more susceptible to ticks because of poor grooming habits. Why then, with the tick needing a blood meal host, is it not discussed that perhaps we are trying to grow moose numbers to a population level that is simply to high?

It has been suggested that perhaps locating moose “licks” – a mineral or salt block – that contains a chemical to kill the ticks after moose feed from the lick. This may be a good idea or not. If we then essentially rid the country of winter ticks, what are the residual effects of the greater ecosystem? Do we know?

While growing moose or any other game animal to artificially high numbers, may have its benefits, maybe we are fight against Mother Nature instead of understand and working with her.

It is, however, idiotic and irresponsible to continue the mantra of climate change, climate change, climate change. We can blame climate change until we vomit but it will never address the scientific realities we face. The climate is always changing. It has always changed and it will continue to change. What then is the difference in how we are choosing to deal with winter ticks? I don’t think it’s that difficult after you are willing to be a scientist seeking truthful answers.

BUT DON’T GO LOOK!!

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Wildlife group considers suing NH Fish and Game over bobcat season

*Editor’s Note* – Also found in this article is the following statement by the Executive Director of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department: “The fact is we have trapping seasons for all sorts of species other than bobcats across the state and I am unaware of us, of anyone accidentally catching a lynx,” he said. “So all I can tell you is the bobcat thing in that respect is a bit of a red herring given all the other species out there that are being trapped.”

This statement can’t help but bring me back to comments and thoughts I have had about events surrounding the “incidental take” of Canada lynx in Maine. New Hampshire and Maine share a common border as well as share a population of Canada lynx. I still find it of grave concern that Maine strangely, after being granted an Incidental Take Permit for Canada lynx by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, that was written to allow for the “incidental” trapping of no more than 5 lynx, and within weeks of the issuance of such a permit, 4 lynx were reported taken in traps – an amount that unquestionably exceeded the average of lynx taken prior to the issuance of a permit.

Now we hear from the E.D. of New Hampshire Fish and Game that they have been trapping bobcats and various other species for years with NO reported incidents of incidental takings of Canada lynx.

It is still my contention that the reported 4 lynx killed in traps in Maine was a criminal act by environmentalists in order to achieve one step closer to the elimination of trapping. The Maine attorney general should have launched an investigation immediately – unless of course he was in on the plan from the beginning.

In the wake of the highly controversial decision to reinstate a state bobcat hunting season, a Washington, D.C.-based wildlife organization is considering suing N.H. Fish and Game and its commission.

If filed, the grounds for the lawsuit would be that a bobcat season could put an endangered lookalike animal at risk, according to an attorney with the Animal Welfare Institute.

In re-establishing the first bobcat hunting season in more than 25 years, N.H. Fish and Game would be in violation of the Endangered Species Act by not providing utmost protection of the Canada lynx, said Tara C. Zuardo, a wildlife attorney.

 

Source: Wildlife group considers suing NH Fish and Game over bobcat season – SentinelSource.com: The Keene Sentinel Local News

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Study: A deadly spring for NH moose calves

*Editor’s Note* – Of the millions of dollars we have spent to pay wildlife managers and it appears they still haven’t come to terms with the fact that managing wildlife involves manipulating populations that create healthy numbers at sustainable levels. Perhaps if we spend enough money (I doubt it seriously) in order that these “managers” have time to figure out that it is management that creates desired balances and not Mother Nature, with it will come the realization that managing wildlife populations because of social demands (wildlife watching and back yard feeding) is, in affect, destroying wildlife.

I’m not holding my breath for any great epiphanies.

Also note that the article uses a few “expects” and “possibilities” in employing its fortune telling.

Rines said it will take a while to fully understand the relationship among changing weather conditions, tick density and moose populations. And warmer winters make it easier for white-tailed deer to survive, she said. Deer herds are growing.

She noted that “if we want to make moose a serious issue, we need to look at keeping our deer densities lower.”

Source: Study: A deadly spring for NH moose calves | New Hampshire

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Christie in N.H.: ‘For all of you who want bobcats killed, I’m your guy’

*Editor’s Note* – If Christie answering a question about whether he would support a proposed hunting/trapping season to cull 50 bobcats isn’t bad enough, consider that some person(s) had nothing more important to ask. It reveals the extent of the animal perversion in this psychopathic society in which we now live.

“I now have a firm position: I am for hunting bobcats,” said Christie, adding that he realized the woman who questioned him Monday wouldn’t like that answer. “A little research, and one vote lost,” he said.

“For all of you who want bobcats killed, I’m your guy,” he said, joking that other candidates have yet to take a position on the issue.

Source: Christie in N.H.: ‘For all of you who want bobcats killed, I’m your guy’ – The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram

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‘Background Checks’ Could Leave Grandmother Disarmed Despite Her Indifference

That some gun owners still don’t think they have a problem with the mandated universal elimination of private transfers shows what happens when the narrative is controlled.  Adding to Bloomberg’s focus group-tested propaganda,  the supposedly objective media acts instead as his partner, amplifier and cheerleader.

The truth is, anti-gun fanatics would rather see the New Hampshire grandmother – and all of us – dead than armed. The “universal background check” scam is just that, just another incremental step on the way to the end goal of citizen disarmament. If gun owners surrender that to them, they’ll be back with another infringement, and another after that.

Source: ‘Background Checks’ Could Leave Grandmother Disarmed Despite Her Indifference – AmmoLand.com Shooting Sports News

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Tallies from hunting show that deer, bear and turkeys are doing well in N.H. – moose, not so much

…although it may seem counterintuitive, hunting seasons are one of the best ways to determine the size and health of wild animal populations. A popular hunting season can send thousands – tens of thousands in the case of deer season – into the woods looking for specific species.

Because hunters must register their kills for major game animals such as deer, bear, turkey and moose at stations, their season provides data about age, weight and general health of individuals and sex ratios of populations. For example, samples taken at deer check-stations let biologists know that chronic wasting disease, often called the deer version of mad cow disease, has not shown up in New Hampshire.

Source: Tallies from hunting show that deer, bear and turkeys are doing well in N.H. – moose, not so much | Concord Monitor

ObamaMooseHunting

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