October 22, 2017

No Predator Control Leads to Increased Problems With Human Interaction

The insane Leftists who want large predators living in everyone’s backyard…except their own of course…continue to repeat the nonsense that in places where bear hunting and trapping, or bear baiting have been eliminated, the bear populations have remained steady, or dropped, and there have been no increase in bear/human encounters. How then does the Left explain the following story?

Officials with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CDEEP) say that bears in the Constitution State number about 700 and are growing at a rate of about 10% per year. In addition, problem complaints from residents are rising proportionately.

Members of New Jersey’s Sierra Club, who say the only “problem” with bears in Connecticut is lack of education to teach people how to live a life as a prisoner so bears can destroy anything they wish, also deliberately lie to say that in New Jersey, after instituting a bear hunt, nothing has changed. Officials with the CDEEP say the data they have on New Jersey shows a marked decrease in the number of bear/human interactions.

This, of course, is a great example of the “post normal” world in which we have been forced to live in. The end justifies the means and either side repeats anything they want, claiming it as “the truth” in order to fulfill their personal agendas.

What to believe and why should any of us believe anything anymore?

Added Note: This report claims that New Jersey’s bear population continues to grow and the overall bear population nationwide has doubled in more than a century to over 400,000.

 

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New Jersey: Historic Account of Killing Wolves Out of Necessity

I was sent a link to an article published in the New Jersey Herald by historic writer for the Herald, Jennie Sweetman – The Wolves Have Left the County–or have they?

Information provided in the article comes mostly from written historic accounts of wolves dating from as early as the 1600s. In those accounts we read of the difficulties people had in tracking down and finding the “problem” wolves that seemed to regularly prey on livestock or were public safety threats.

After reading this article, I was taken back to a few years prior, when I spent a great deal of time writing a multi-part, world wide, historic accounting of wolves and the difficulties men had in dealing with them. The series was titled, “To Catch a Wolf.” Note: I put the many parts together into one longer article which can be read and/or downloaded here. I would also like to make note that in my recent book, “Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?” I shared some of that history, including the story which I am about to republish for readers.

One account written of in the article, linked-to above, tells of the efforts and struggles that one group of men went through in order to find and kill one exceptionally bad behaving wolf – and one wolf that had been around the block a time or two. I thought about this account and was reminded of another historic account, somewhere here in America, that had far more tragic an ending to it.

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In 1854, Hurst and Blackett published Thomas Chandler Haliburton’s book, “The Americans at Home: Or, Byeways, Backwoods, and Prairies.” In that book is a chapter titled, Wolf-Hunting on the Turkisag. This is one account of a seemingly bizarre, daring, if not ignorant, rough and tumble wolf hunt, one that takes place under the full of the moon and putting every participant in danger of their lives.

I tried and failed to find out where the Turkisag was. Assuming it was a mapped out place or location, I searched and found nothing. I began then to look more closely at the word itself and with knowledge that this book was written in the mid-1800s, I wondered if the Turkisag was a created word of local origin.

Turk or turki relates to either the country of Turkey or the bird animal turkey. Sag used as a description could mean a depression, a valley, maybe even a hollow or some such. It is only a guess on my part but I thought maybe Turkisag came literally from the turkey sag. I might be completely wrong and would welcome any explanations.

Regardless of what or where Turkisag was, the author Haliburton, gives us a bit of a description of the area.

“It was broad moonlight when we arrived at the place selected as the scene of operations. The Turkisag possesses a different aspect from the Blue Ridge. The latter is of a noble and magnificent description, but the scenery of the former is of a different order: there was an air of desolation hovering about it that produced feelings of awe, and you gazed around you as if in expectation of beholding something instinct with horror. Dark and gloomy caves or holes met your sight on every side; but where a level spot presented itself, it was thickly covered with trees, short, and of monstrous bulk, so that they nearly shut out the light of the moon in various places.”

The stage is set for the hunt. There are around 50 men all armed with guns and ammunition and lots of it. Haliburton tells us that many times hunters/shooters can’t leave their posts for several days. This is after all the time of year when “wolves are the most ravenous, mustered in great numbers.”

This kind of wolf hunt is referred to as a skirl, being defined as a shrill and piercing sound. That name and description alone would be enough to send shivers up and down the spine.

One party locates a place where they will build a scaffolding, where shooters can lie in wait for the wolves. Read Haliburton’s depiction of the place and the construction.

“The spot where we purposed to erect our scaffolding was in the dreariest place we could select, and, as it proved, where wolves were the most numerous. First, we all set to work with our axes, and cleared a space of about fifty feet in extent, by cutting down the smaller trees, leaving, of course, the larger ones standing. At the extreme west of this clear space, two scaffolds were erected after this wise: branches of trees were driven into the earth, six or eight inches apart, rising above the ground about eight feet; then a great quantity of brushwood was wove around them from the bottom to the top, presenting a strong basket or net-work; across the top were laid large branches, affording a tolerably firm flooring; and around the works props were placed, giving sufficient strength to the whole capable of bearing the weight of the party; a rude ladder was also made to enable us to ascend, but more particularly for the runner, whose share of the dangers of wolf- shooting was not inconsiderable. These scaffolds were built nearly on the edge of a precipice of about sixty feet in height; on the north-east, and about one hundred feet from us, arose a peak, stretching far above our heads, overhanging a gap in the mountain about twelve feet wide. The opposite point was somewhat lower than that on which we stood, making a considerable descent, leading round to the place where we were encamped. Before us appeared an interminable forest, with here and there a cave, the uncertain moonlight only adding to its repulsive appearance.”

Did you pick up on the term “runner?” Frighteningly so, it is exactly as you might imagine. Two men are “selected.” God knows what process that is actually used to pick who will be the runners aside from the fact that they should be young, fit and able to run fast.

Their task is to head out into the forest to find the wolves. Then the runner has to get the wolves to chase him. Utilizing only the available moonlight and a few dimly lit torches, the runner must use his blazing speed to stay just ahead of the wolves while hopefully successfully negotiating the landscape in the darkness of night. One mistake and it’s toast.

The runner then must enter the scaffolding area in time to climb the ladder to safety and before the wolves catch him or the bullets hit him from when guns begin blasting at the wolves.

The author at one point writes that the runners take some kind of drug with them. Little is said about it so we can only guess as to whether it was something they thought would enhance their speed or awareness or maybe it was to quell the fear. Maybe it was even used for something else.

“Then, taking from his pouch a drug, a piece of which they placed in their moccasins, and holding the remainder between their fingers,”

Picture if you can how a shooter must be feeling. It is dark and you are stationed on a platform above an area set for ambush. You know that two men are being used as decoys and they are depending on you to kill the wolves before they get killed. Here’s how it began to unfold.

“Presently a faint howl was heard, that caused the blood to rush to my heart. Nothing but actual experience can enable any one to form a correct estimate of the intense anxiety that a person labours under on such occasions. Again, another howl, more loud, then another—another, from every direction of the wood ; then simultaneously, a burst, as if from myriads, resounded through the wild, echoing from mount to mount, followed up by cries still more awful and terrific.

“Be ready!” said an old hunter beside me, in a tone that betrayed the excitement he felt, ” for we shall have work to do presently; ” and at that instant a wolf emerged from the wood into the open space, the torches revealing him plainly to our view. A dozen rifle balls in an instant pierced him. Another followed, glancing first at the torches, and then at us, as if uncertain what course to take.

“Be chary of your ammunition,” said the same hunter, “for we may need all we’ve got;” and he raised his rifle, as the wolf was turning back, and instantly brought him to the ground.”

The terror and the stress is building. The air is filled with blood-curdling howls, shooters are unloading on one wolf and you are reminded not to waste your ammunition. With that all dancing in your mind, along with the fact two human beings are out there streaking through the forest and running in fear for their lives, you hope you won’t miss.

The first runner appears.

“We could not discover the least sign of their proximity, and the awful howls now came thick upon our startled senses, borne upon the breeze that whistled past us. Suddenly we heard footsteps, and could detect the quick breathings of a person, followed close by the rush of multitudes of those ravenous beasts, and presently the form of Ralph was seen, darting like a winged bird towards the goal. Close upon his track are seen the wolves—they press upon him, their eyes gloating at the prospect of his becoming their victim—lie looks not behind—he gains the open space—already they clutch at his legs—he eludes their fangs, and with a spring reaches the ladder —the next moment he falls breathless upon the scaffold—he is Safe !”

As the guns crack and the dead wolves begin to pile up, Haliburton’s description of what is taking place sheds some light on what the runners used the drugs they took with them for.

“The gleam of the torches threw a fitful light on their protruding tongues and glaring eyeballs, as they ran to and fro, rendered frantic by the unnatural appearance of the flames, and the exciting nature of the drug used by the runners, so that they fell easy victims to our murderous fire, which, however, in no way appeared to check their onward rush.”

Did the runners use some kind of bait or food laced with this drug to first feed the wolves? Obviously it appears as though the drug was used to alter their behavior.

But what of the second runner?

Appearing from the dark, through the midst of the chaos and frantic behaviors of both men and beast, the second runner appears, surrounded by wolves on both sides and from behind. He cannot make the ladder to safety.

Hunters open fire on the wolves and the runner is yelled at and told to try to jump the ravine ahead, knowing the odds of him making it were slim but doing nothing would result in being eaten alive by ravaging wolves.

The shooters continue to kill massive numbers of wolves until they run out of ammunition. The runner is left to his own desire and willpower to live. He opts for the ravine, jumps and doesn’t make it.

What possesses men that they would be driven to such extremes in order to kill wolves? Was this only about the hunt or was this something that had to be done to protect the people and their property?

Wherever the Turkisag was, make no mistake there seemed to be an endless population of wolves that night. How many got killed we know not but several and it cost one young man his life.

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But..But..Fences Ain’t Natural – Let Nature Regulate It

Flat Rock Brook Nature Center is planning to tackle deer overpopulation within its 150-acres of land by placing an eight-foot-tall deer fence around the property to stop forest degradation.

Source: Fence planned to keep deer out Flat Rock Brook Nature Center – Environment – NorthJersey.com

Maybe this is the same cause and effect?

“What went off in Syria was the bomb of human stupidity, abetted by invincible hubris and accelerated by the unquenchable fire of fanatical dogmatism.  The result was ruin.”<<<Source>>>

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NJ Man [Exit 29] who Shoots 3 Problem Bears gets $4,000+ Fines and Fees

In October, 2014, a 76-year-old New Jersey resident shot three problem bears on his property.  One was an adult sow that was on his deck and looking in through his sliding glass door.  The location of the two juvenile bears when they were shot, is disputed, but was either on the deck or close to it.  Bears are more dangerous as they are larding up for the winter hibernation.

Bears that display this level of familiarity with humans, who associate humans with food, are a severe problems waiting to happen.  It is why the conservation community has come up with a well used phrase: A fed bear is a dead bear.

Source: NJ Man who Shoots 3 Problem Bears gets $4,000+ Fines and Fees

BearMoose

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N.J. Shoots More Deer Than ME, NH, VT, MA

NJTrophies

<<<Source>>>

HillaryBuck

 

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New Jersey bear permits are a bargain

The most-populated state in the nation has too many bears, so they roam where they shouldn’t be, doing property and crop damage, sometimes killing pets and livestock. But bear hunting is work, and if hunters don’t do it, then we’ll have more bear problems, so bear permits are cheap, not a moneymaker.

Source: New Jersey bear permits are a bargain

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Wolves, coyotes and foxes roaming Trenton streets, councilman says

*Editor’s Note* – Snicker…snicker. And what should people expect? Protect them and they will come!

Packs of wild animals including wolves, coyotes and foxes are running around on city streets after dark and residents are raising concerns about their safety, according to a Trenton councilman.Councilman George Muschal said he received reports from residents about the animals and saw a gray fox cross in front of his truck last Tuesday at the corner of Hudson and Broad Streets.”If a child is out there or a dog in the yard it might be a problem,” said Muschal, speaking during a council meeting Thursday night

Source: Wolves, coyotes and foxes roaming Trenton streets, councilman says | NJ.com

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Fisherman Fights Off Coyote In Spotswood, NJ

The 17-year-old tells the Home News Tribune he saw “two big yellow eyes” in the woods and the animal started to growl.

Bonsante says he grabbed a big stick and hit the animal as it lunged for his neck.<<<Read More>>>

SpotswoodNJ

SpotswoodDevoeLake

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Real or Not: Wolves, Coyotes and Foxes in Downtown Trenton Are Where They Ought to Be

Packs of wild animals including wolves, coyotes and foxes are running around on city streets after dark and residents are raising concerns about their safety, according to a Trenton councilman.

Councilman George Muschal said he received reports from residents about the animals and saw a gray fox cross in front of his truck last Tuesday at the corner of Hudson and Broad Streets.

“If a child is out there or a dog in the yard it might be a problem,” said Muschal, speaking during a council meeting Thursday night.<<<Read More>>>

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Insanity and Diversions

Insanity is running rampant in our world, filling the airwaves and media platforms with tons of diversions, i.e. meaningless, nonsense. Here’s some examples:

1. Logging leads to long-term release of carbon from soils in Northeastern hardwood forests

This report is loaded with “maybes” and “mights,” all classical examples of “creating new knowledge” and “shifting paradigms.” Utter useless nonsense.

2. New Jersey bear hunt fueled by emotion over mauling death

Blow-back from the bear mauling death of a Rutgers University Student, delusional people, more interested in romantic notions of bears, blame everyone and everything for why bears attack people. In this case, let’s blame it on hunting and sound proven wildlife management. Remember, these clowns have been brainwashed into believing that “we must change the way in which we discuss wildlife management.”

3. California bans coyote hunts that offer prizes

From the article linked to above, we read: “Awarding prizes for wildlife killing contests is both unethical and inconsistent with our modern understand[ing] of natural systems.” By some totalitarian socialist it is perceived as unethical and because of intense training since birth, believe it is their appointed duty to force their ethics down the throats of other people. However, note the part of the comment that says that coyote derbies WITH PRIZES, is, “inconsistent with our modern understanding of natural systems.” (emphasis added)

This is another classic example of the ongoing effort to “create new understanding,” and “create new knowledge,” and “changing the way we discuss wildlife management.” Modern understanding is absolute post-normal, new-science, scientism at its finest. Also, utter nonsense.

4. More lynx being trapped in Maine, but reasons in dispute

Blinded by hatred of American heritage, all things normal and humans in general, in Maine, totalitarian, animal rights booger men say that because Maine was issued an Incidental Take Permit (ITP) for trapping by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, more Canada lynx are being caught in traps. The idiocy here is that the only thing, as it pertains to trapping, that has changed is that Maine designated 22,000 acres of public lands to protect the Canada lynx. None of the already strict trapping guidelines have changed from the Consent Decree that was signed and in affect until such time as an ITP could be obtained.

So, what has changed that might be causing a few more Canada lynx to be “incidentally” caught and released unharmed? How about the fact that when lynx were declared a “threatened” species in Maine, the lie was there were fewer than 500 of the animals. Today, Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife guesstimate there are closer to 1,000 – 1,500. One with a brain might conclude that having 2 to 3 times the number of Canada lynx might play a role in a few more lynx being “incidentally” trapped and released unharmed. But let’s not let sensibility stand in the way of human hatred and animal perversion.

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