October 21, 2019

Trust Your Elected Government Representative?

AHEM!

An op-ed found on the Maine Wire, says that making laws through the referendum process is not a good way to do it, and lists some of the reasons why this might be so. Unfortunately, the author doesn’t offer a precise solution but does intimate that placing trust in the representatives that got elected as being the best solution. “When we elect lawmakers, we expect them to weigh various proposals. Recognizing that a first draft isn’t always the best, we empower the Legislature to amend bills, sanding off rough edges and trying to fashion the best solution to the problem at hand. They don’t — or at least, shouldn’t — capitulate to an advocacy group simply because that group has a lot of money or yells the loudest.”

From my perspective, the entire process of electing representatives and making laws is flawed and corrupt. The author’s perspective also appears a bit idealistic and probably is rooted in his own connections to the political system. However, to think that wealthy political influencers can control the law making process through the referendum process and such corruption is immune via the legislative process is naive. It’s the only thing that drives all laws in this country.

A troubling part of this process is when political activists begin demanding changes to how the system works when things aren’t going their way or they are feeling threatened. Often overlooked in the emotional action and reaction is that changes to processes work in all directions and often comes round and bites you on the backside.

To suggest doing away with the referendum process, relying solely on elected officials, is both foolish and dangerous. Doing so would further eliminate the right of people to petition the government. Is that what we really want? When’s the last time you saw an elected politician refuse to “go along to get along” in order to carry out the majority wishes of his or her constituency?

It seems in Maine over the past few years, a lot of noise has arisen about the signature gathering process to get referendums onto a ballot. And now we hear suggestions that the process is a terrible way of making laws. Isn’t the real problem a matter of finding a way to keep the referendum process for Maine, or any other state, within the political processes of that state, as well as discovering, somehow, ways to control the flow of money?

Government is dangerous enough without handing them another free pass to disregard the wishes of the voters. Unfortunately, we live in a Socio-Democratic society where all it takes is 51% of the people to force the rest to live by their rules. This may be a terrible political system to live under but I assure you that having no recourse than to simply allow government officials to dictate terms more than they already do, is an even worse suggestion as a possible solution.

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Marx Slandered America

Adopting the terminology of our sworn enemies makes it harder to win the debate. Marx slandered our system of economic freedom as capitalism, which might be described by some as the priority of capital over everything else. However, that is not our system. Favoritism violates our Founders’ values that require equal protection for all of us under the law. Equality and individualism go together. Cronyism and oligarchy, are characteristics of Communist and fascist nationalist systems which are evil Hegelian twin philosophies that deny our system of individualism that is set out in our Constitution.

Americans have had the highest per capita income in the world since the 1830’s, a resounding economic success not only in comparison to other half-baked Marxist systems but also in the history of the mankind on earth. Anyone who points out China as an exception must explain how they would like to live in abject poverty and enslavement under the control of some 300 ultra-wealthy Communists who control the country and its un-redistributed $5 trillion dollar surplus.

Livy writes from a bunkhouse on the southern high plains of Texas.

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