December 12, 2017

Counting The Days Until Spring

It’s really not been much of a winter across most of the United States, except Alaska. Even still, with the days inching along getting a bit longer each day and the sun edging its way higher into the sky, anything of bright colors spurs us on for the passage into spring. But not everyone is subjected to winter in the classic sense.

Florida has been a warm winter as well, but added warmth during the winter in Florida doesn’t mean less snow it means more days at the beach and more time spent in shorts, T-shirts and flip-flops. “Livin’ on sponge cake. Watchin’ the sun bake. All of those tourists covered in oil.”

As the sun came up this morning over the eastern horizon, I took note of one of the pots of flowers scattered around the yard. What caught my eye was one pot of brilliant red petunias, dancing in a light southeast breeze.

I grabbed my little PHD (push here dummy) camera, grabbed a couple shots and here’s one of them.


Photo by Tom Remington Click on image for a larger view.

Share

Chugach Mountains State Park Looking East From Anchorage

To the left is Bird Creek Pass; to the right is Indian Creek Pass. Ship Creek is in view and flows this way (west) towards Anchorage and goes to the port, up town. Bird and Indian creeks are fishable also from Turnagain Arm south five and tens miles.


Photo by Al Remington Click on image to enlarge – very nice)

Share

Anchorage Snowbanks


Photo by Al Remington

Share

Wintertime in Alaska: High Noon and Alaska Range

*Editor’s Note:* The following photos and commentary were provided by Alaska resident Al Remington – January 2012

Even at High Noon, tire tracks in the snow have shadows.


Click image to enlarge

South Peak, Mt. Susitna. The natives call this mountain Sleeping Lady.


Click image to enlarge

Alaska Range is actually the Tordillo Mountains; Mt. Spur, Mt. Torbert has six named glaciers flowing this direction and seven or eight glaciers on the back also flowing this direction, mostly east to the Yentna River near the mouth of the Susitna River. Good fishing at the mouths. The mnts. are about 75 miles away.


Click on image to enlarge

Share

Alaska is Chillin’ and More Snow Rope Artwork

A report coming to sunny Florida from Aniak, Alaska is that the temperature there was -55 degrees Fahrenheit. Nice! Aniak is on the Kuskokwim River northeast of Bethel.

Below are some more photos of Alaska’s icy trees near Anchorage, along with more “snow ropes” and a bit of snow art around the shrubs and bushes.


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington

Share

Alaska – Cold and Snowy. More Than Normal?

Below are some photographs depicting some of the cold and snow in the Anchorage area. Last week I received one report that Valdez, Alaska, a coastal town of just over 4,000 people that sits east of Anchorage, currently has 321 inches of snow. Make no mistake about it, that’s a lot of snow. However, according to Valdez websites, the average annual snowfall is about 360 inches. It’s still early in the winter season though.

And, this morning I heard on the news that Nome, Alaska was having difficulty getting heating fuel into the town because of the cold. The report said Alaska was currently experiencing the coldest winter in 40 years. In parts of the winter, Nome’s average daily high is 5.7 degrees.


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington


Photo by Al Remington

Share

Mt. Redoubt and Mt. Iliamna, Alaska


Mt. Redoubt, Alaska
Photo by Al Remington


Mt. Iliamna, Alaska
Photo by Al Remington


Mt. Iliamn, Alaska on the left. Mt. Redoubt, Alaska on the right.
Photo by Al Remington

Share

Kenai, Alaska Moose


Photo by Al Remington

Share

“When enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.”

Those words are from Aldo Leopold. The entire quote goes like this: “All conservation of wildness is self-defeating, for to cherish we must see and fondle, and when enough have seen and fondled, there is no wilderness left to cherish.”

I am not very much of an Aldo Leopold fan, nor am I much of an idealist as are most fans of Leopold, Muir, Roosevelt and others.

When hunting in the woods, as I did this past November, early on, even though much of the terrain I cover is the same terrain I and others like me and those before have tread, I sometimes desire to escape to a fool’s paradise, imagining I am some place no man has ever been.

One day I reached a place. It was ever quiet. The sky was deep blue, a light breeze and seasonably warm was the air. Nature’s breath smelled earthen, full of rot at times blended with brief whiffs of sweet fern. In the distance I distinguished the bubbling and crackling of a brook. Dead leaves would drift lazily to the ground as the gentle and yet invisible zephyrs took control, seemingly to steer the leaves where God could best make use of them.

I must be there. I must have reached that happiness that exudes when a man believes he has stood where no man has mounted before.

Okay! This is all made up stuff. None of this really happened but I was surprised when I reached a place where I knew few, if any, hunters probably made their way only to discover perched on a small rock just to my side was an apple core. Judging from the picture, it hadn’t been there too long as some of the apple still appeared white and the elements hadn’t taken the fruit from its lofty perch.

Sometimes we can be just as surprised with what we see as what we don’t.


Photo by Tom Remington

Share