July 25, 2017

Hey, God’s Here.

There is a winged Serpent in the Vatican.  Well, some of us knew that.  There is another winged serpent there with the opope.  The winged serpent god of War – Kukulkan.

God Almighty, Our Heavenly Father, would be spending the next month with the Taoist thunder god Lei Gong in the cloud kingdom over Tibet.

…as well as try performing a transubstantiation or two. And perhaps toward the end of his stay, if he’s feeling up to it, Kukulkan can treat us all to an authentic human sacrifice.”

from the ONION

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The White Pope is just another puppet

Lux-Verbi is pleased to announce the forthcoming publication of P.D. Stuart’s most controversial book to date :POPE FRANCIS—Lord of The World… OR “Surprising Revelations that Threaten Pope Francis’ Reforms…”
Pope Francis is a man of many firsts: the first Jesuit pope, the first South American, the firstnon-European to be pontiff in almost 1,300 years; and the very first pope to be invited to speak to a joint session of the US Congress—viz., the first religious leader to address US lawmakers!
Francis’ first actions were called “unprecedented and shocking” by one veteran Vatican reporter; and his subsequent reforming initiatives have been deemed “epochal” and “revolutionary”.
How did he acquire these political and people skills? Where do his ‘revolutionary’ ideas come from, and what does he hope to achieve by his ‘rhetoric’?
Will Francis be permitted the freedom to act contrary to the dictates of the Jesuit General? In speaking of Francis’ limitations to effect true reforms, P.D. Stuart quotes the Jesuit-trained Count Campello, a once highly esteemed Canon of St. Peter’s Basilica (and a great friend of one former pope), who when illustrating this fact, drew a circle, and said, “Within that circle he [the pope] is free to act; if he crosses it, he is a dead man.”
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Pope Francis Speaks With Forked Tongue

ForkedTongue*Editor’s Note* – In the following article, it is not my intention to anger and ridicule those who choose to follow the Catholic religion. I am not anybody’s judge. What you do and believe is your business. However, when Pope Francis chose to air his dirty laundry by crafting (which I believe he did not write himself) an encyclical about terrible “human beings” destroying the earth and causing “Climate Change,” then I believe he has made himself available for ridicule of his behavior and to point out his beliefs being contrary to the real Word of God. His failure in his work to even once reference God’s plan of Salvation through the redemptive power of the Blood of Christ, while extolling the power found in “spiritually” connecting with animals and the environment, I believe is a true representation of the “religion” of the Vatican and not being true representatives of the Word of God.

So long as Jorge Bergoglio (Pope Francis) wants to toss his hat into the political and fake scientific arena of climate change and the environment, he is fair game.

The Word of God tells me that those who engage in false teachings, lying, etc., I should express sharp disapproval or criticism of their behavior (rebuke), “that others also may fear.”(1 Tim 5:20)

Over the past several weeks, I’ve spent a considerable amount of time reading and researching Pope Francis’ LAUDATO SI’, an encyclical about what many believe to be man-caused Climate Change. I assure you it is NOT about Climate Change. It is about a promotion of the false teachings of the Catholic Church.

That this Encyclical even got any press is only representative of the fact that the Vatican holds the power of the Press and can, will and does get published anything it wishes. Such is the case. After all, Pope Francis is not any kind of authority on climate science or the environment for that matter. I read one man’s assessment of the Pope’s encyclical, a man who has been a member of the Catholic Church for many years: “…it is a meaningless and inappropriate topic, especially when presented as a Papal Encyclical.”

It is my opinion, based solely of the Word of God, that Laudato Si is, in many ways, words intended to mislead many hundreds of thousands of people, especially those who have already become victims of the Rulers in Dark Places.

Unless you are firmly grounded in God’s Word, I would highly recommend NOT reading this encyclical. As I said, I believe it is intended for the blind followers of the Catholic “religion.”

I would, however, like to take a moment to point out a few things written in this work. Whether you are a follower of the Catholic religion or not, gaining understanding of some of the words written here, should give you cause to question the leader of this earthly “religion.”

I do not believe it is simply a coincidence that the Pope uses the words “human being” 58 times in this work. A reader of this website graciously pointed out that he does not consider himself to be a “human being.” He and I are men.

Because the Vatican has historically done everything in Latin, as well as, until recent years, forbade the reading of the Bible (for the purpose of hiding from its followers the true meaning of God’s Word), then if we examine the Latin definition of “human” we learn that it means, “of or belonging to a man.” I assure you I belong to NO MAN.

To remain in context with this website, Jorge Mario Bergoglio, speaks often in his encyclical about the relationship of “human beings” with animals and in what he describes as our responsibility as “Christians,” because the Bible commands it, to care for all creatures because they are part of the Trinity of God. He passes the same responsibility, for much the same reasons, onto “Christians” to care for our “environment.” More on this nonsense later.

Whoever carries the title of “pope” is also titled as “Vicar of Christ,” meaning that the pope is Christ’s representative on earth. Utter nonsense. This is a self-proclaimed title that is contrary to the teachings of the Bible. However, if Bergoglio is in such direct communication with God, because, according the Catholic teachings, none of us can pray to or be in contact with God, and if we pray we have to pray to Mary, then why doesn’t Bergoglio use the power of his encyclical to speak of the redeeming power of the Blood of Jesus Christ that was shed for our salvation?

He toils through many words to chastise “human beings” for destroying the earth and causing global warming but can only offer help by encouraging us to gain some kind of “spirituality” with the environment.

True believers in God’s Word, not the vicar’s words, know that all the problems the pope laments about that are destroying HIS earth, were taken care of on the Cross. Certainly, one must ask of whom does the Vatican worship that it seeks a “spirituality” with the environment and with animals?

The Bible also teaches that we are not to pray to anybody except God the Creator through is Son Jesus Christ. To pray to a woman, believing that Mary has better persuasive tactics with Jesus, is not only ridiculous, but it is anti-Biblical, anti-Christ. And yet, Bergoglio’s church, which questionably sees the woman described in Revelation 12: 1 and 2 as their blessed mother Mary. But what goes beyond bizarre is that Bergoglio says that Mary, “is the Mother and Queen of all creation,” and that for that reason we must all bow down and worship the creation and not the creator? Blasphemy!

Bergoglio writes: “For Christians, believing in one God who is trinitarian communion suggests that the Trinity has left its mark on all creation. Saint Bonaventure went so far as to say that human beings, before sin, were able to see how each creature “testifies that God is three”. The reflection of the Trinity was there to be recognized in nature “when that book was open to man and our eyes had not yet become darkened.”

What we see here is exactly what is found throughout the entirety of the pope’s encyclical. The overwhelming majority of words written and the attempt at substantiation, are done so only by Catholic teachings, the words of men, and almost never by the Word of God. Again I ask, who does this man and the Vatican worship? Why does the Vatican see need to support the false teachings of man-caused Climate Change?

Nowhere in God’s real words, does the Creator even suggest that animals share in the gift of the Trinity of God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Ghost. Nowhere! Claiming otherwise is blasphemous to God.

Evidently Jorge Bergoglio is encouraging his followers, and anyone else interested in following his anti-Biblical teachings, to become “spiritual” with animals and the creation. To him, it’s the only way we can save the planet. For me, the Bible I read promises that this planet will not be destroyed. I can’t say the same thing for those who scoff at God’s Word and deliberately teach against it and/or bastardize God’s Word.

Below, I am posting a portion of Pope Francis’ words for you to read and hopefully gain some real understanding. I am going to embolden certain words and phrases for no other reason than what I hope will give you reason to stop, ask questions and seek answers.

III. ECOLOGICAL CONVERSION

216. The rich heritage of Christian spirituality, the fruit of twenty centuries of personal and communal experience, has a precious contribution to make to the renewal of humanity. Here, I would like to offer Christians a few suggestions for an ecological spirituality grounded in the convictions of our faith, since the teachings of the Gospel have direct consequences for our way of thinking, feeling and living. More than in ideas or concepts as such, I am interested in how such a spirituality can motivate us to a more passionate concern for the protection of our world. A commitment this lofty cannot be sustained by doctrine alone, without a spirituality capable of inspiring us, without an “interior impulse which encourages, motivates, nourishes and gives meaning to our individual and communal activity”.[151] Admittedly, Christians have not always appropriated and developed the spiritual treasures bestowed by God upon the Church, where the life of the spirit is not dissociated from the body or from nature or from worldly realities, but lived in and with them, in communion with all that surrounds us.

217. “The external deserts in the world are growing, because the internal deserts have become so vast”.[152] For this reason, the ecological crisis is also a summons to profound interior conversion. It must be said that some committed and prayerful Christians, with the excuse of realism and pragmatism, tend to ridicule expressions of concern for the environment. Others are passive; they choose not to change their habits and thus become inconsistent. So what they all need is an “ecological conversion”, whereby the effects of their encounter with Jesus Christ become evident in their relationship with the world around them. Living our vocation to be protectors of God’s handiwork is essential to a life of virtue; it is not an optional or a secondary aspect of our Christian experience.

218. In calling to mind the figure of Saint Francis of Assisi, we come to realize that a healthy relationship with creation is one dimension of overall personal conversion, which entails the recognition of our errors, sins, faults and failures, and leads to heartfelt repentance and desire to change. The Australian bishops spoke of the importance of such conversion for achieving reconciliation with creation: “To achieve such reconciliation, we must examine our lives and acknowledge the ways in which we have harmed God’s creation through our actions and our failure to act. We need to experience a conversion, or change of heart”.[153]

219. Nevertheless, self-improvement on the part of individuals will not by itself remedy the extremely complex situation facing our world today. Isolated individuals can lose their ability and freedom to escape the utilitarian mindset, and end up prey to an unethical consumerism bereft of social or ecological awareness. Social problems must be addressed by community networks and not simply by the sum of individual good deeds. This task “will make such tremendous demands of man that he could never achieve it by individual initiative or even by the united effort of men bred in an individualistic way. The work of dominating the world calls for a union of skills and a unity of achievement that can only grow from quite a different attitude”.[154] The ecological conversion needed to bring about lasting change is also a community conversion.

220. This conversion calls for a number of attitudes which together foster a spirit of generous care, full of tenderness. First, it entails gratitude and gratuitousness, a recognition that the world is God’s loving gift, and that we are called quietly to imitate his generosity in self-sacrifice and good works: “Do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing… and your Father who sees in secret will reward you” (Mt 6:3-4). It also entails a loving awareness that we are not disconnected from the rest of creatures, but joined in a splendid universal communion. As believers, we do not look at the world from without but from within, conscious of the bonds with which the Father has linked us to all beings. By developing our individual, God-given capacities, an ecological conversion can inspire us to greater creativity and enthusiasm in resolving the world’s problems and in offering ourselves to God “as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable” (Rom 12:1). We do not understand our superiority as a reason for personal glory or irresponsible dominion, but rather as a different capacity which, in its turn, entails a serious responsibility stemming from our faith.

221. Various convictions of our faith, developed at the beginning of this Encyclical can help us to enrich the meaning of this conversion. These include the awareness that each creature reflects something of God and has a message to convey to us, and the security that Christ has taken unto himself this material world and now, risen, is intimately present to each being, surrounding it with his affection and penetrating it with his light. Then too, there is the recognition that God created the world, writing into it an order and a dynamism that human beings have no right to ignore. We read in the Gospel that Jesus says of the birds of the air that “not one of them is forgotten before God” (Lk 12:6). How then can we possibly mistreat them or cause them harm? I ask all Christians to recognize and to live fully this dimension of their conversion. May the power and the light of the grace we have received also be evident in our relationship to other creatures and to the world around us. In this way, we will help nurture that sublime fraternity with all creation which Saint Francis of Assisi so radiantly embodied.

V. CIVIC AND POLITICAL LOVE

231. Love, overflowing with small gestures of mutual care, is also civic and political, and it makes itself felt in every action that seeks to build a better world. Love for society and commitment to the common good are outstanding expressions of a charity which affects not only relationships between individuals but also “macro-relationships, social, economic and political ones”.[156] That is why the Church set before the world the ideal of a “civilization of love”.[157] Social love is the key to authentic development: “In order to make society more human, more worthy of the human person, love in social life – political, economic and cultural – must be given renewed value, becoming the constant and highest norm for all activity”.[158] In this framework, along with the importance of little everyday gestures, social love moves us to devise larger strategies to halt environmental degradation and to encourage a “culture of care” which permeates all of society. When we feel that God is calling us to intervene with others in these social dynamics, we should realize that this too is part of our spirituality, which is an exercise of charity and, as such, matures and sanctifies us.

232. Not everyone is called to engage directly in political life. Society is also enriched by a countless array of organizations which work to promote the common good and to defend the environment, whether natural or urban. Some, for example, show concern for a public place (a building, a fountain, an abandoned monument, a landscape, a square), and strive to protect, restore, improve or beautify it as something belonging to everyone. Around these community actions, relationships develop or are recovered and a new social fabric emerges. Thus, a community can break out of the indifference induced by consumerism. These actions cultivate a shared identity, with a story which can be remembered and handed on. In this way, the world, and the quality of life of the poorest, are cared for, with a sense of solidarity which is at the same time aware that we live in a common home which God has entrusted to us. These community actions, when they express self-giving love, can also become intense spiritual experiences.

VI. SACRAMENTAL SIGNS AND THE CELEBRATION OF REST

233. The universe unfolds in God, who fills it completely. Hence, there is a mystical meaning to be found in a leaf, in a mountain trail, in a dewdrop, in a poor person’s face.[159] The ideal is not only to pass from the exterior to the interior to discover the action of God in the soul, but also to discover God in all things. Saint Bonaventure teaches us that “contemplation deepens the more we feel the working of God’s grace within our hearts, and the better we learn to encounter God in creatures outside ourselves”.[160]

234. Saint John of the Cross taught that all the goodness present in the realities and experiences of this world “is present in God eminently and infinitely, or more properly, in each of these sublime realities is God”.[161] This is not because the finite things of this world are really divine, but because the mystic experiences the intimate connection between God and all beings, and thus feels that “all things are God”.[162] Standing awestruck before a mountain, he or she cannot separate this experience from God, and perceives that the interior awe being lived has to be entrusted to the Lord: “Mountains have heights and they are plentiful, vast, beautiful, graceful, bright and fragrant. These mountains are what my Beloved is to me. Lonely valleys are quiet, pleasant, cool, shady and flowing with fresh water; in the variety of their groves and in the sweet song of the birds, they afford abundant recreation and delight to the senses, and in their solitude and silence, they refresh us and give rest. These valleys are what my Beloved is to me”.[163]

235. The Sacraments are a privileged way in which nature is taken up by God to become a means of mediating supernatural life. Through our worship of God, we are invited to embrace the world on a different plane. Water, oil, fire and colours are taken up in all their symbolic power and incorporated in our act of praise. The hand that blesses is an instrument of God’s love and a reflection of the closeness of Jesus Christ, who came to accompany us on the journey of life. Water poured over the body of a child in Baptism is a sign of new life. Encountering God does not mean fleeing from this world or turning our back on nature. This is especially clear in the spirituality of the Christian East. “Beauty, which in the East is one of the best loved names expressing the divine harmony and the model of humanity transfigured, appears everywhere: in the shape of a church, in the sounds, in the colours, in the lights, in the scents”.[164] For Christians, all the creatures of the material universe find their true meaning in the incarnate Word, for the Son of God has incorporated in his person part of the material world, planting in it a seed of definitive transformation. “Christianity does not reject matter. Rather, bodiliness is considered in all its value in the liturgical act, whereby the human body is disclosed in its inner nature as a temple of the Holy Spirit and is united with the Lord Jesus, who himself took a body for the world’s salvation”.[165]

236. It is in the Eucharist that all that has been created finds its greatest exaltation. Grace, which tends to manifest itself tangibly, found unsurpassable expression when God himself became man and gave himself as food for his creatures. The Lord, in the culmination of the mystery of the Incarnation, chose to reach our intimate depths through a fragment of matter. He comes not from above, but from within, he comes that we might find him in this world of ours. In the Eucharist, fullness is already achieved; it is the living centre of the universe, the overflowing core of love and of inexhaustible life. Joined to the incarnate Son, present in the Eucharist, the whole cosmos gives thanks to God. Indeed the Eucharist is itself an act of cosmic love: “Yes, cosmic! Because even when it is celebrated on the humble altar of a country church, the Eucharist is always in some way celebrated on the altar of the world”.[166] The Eucharist joins heaven and earth; it embraces and penetrates all creation. The world which came forth from God’s hands returns to him in blessed and undivided adoration: in the bread of the Eucharist, “creation is projected towards divinization, towards the holy wedding feast, towards unification with the Creator himself”.[167] Thus, the Eucharist is also a source of light and motivation for our concerns for the environment, directing us to be stewards of all creation.

237. On Sunday, our participation in the Eucharist has special importance. Sunday, like the Jewish Sabbath, is meant to be a day which heals our relationships with God, with ourselves, with others and with the world. Sunday is the day of the Resurrection, the “first day” of the new creation, whose first fruits are the Lord’s risen humanity, the pledge of the final transfiguration of all created reality.… The law of weekly rest forbade work on the seventh day, “so that your ox and your donkey may have rest, and the son of your maidservant, and the stranger, may be refreshed” (Ex 23:12). Rest opens our eyes to the larger picture and gives us renewed sensitivity to the rights of others. And so the day of rest, centred on the Eucharist, sheds it light on the whole week, and motivates us to greater concern for nature and the poor.

VII. THE TRINITY AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATURES

238. The Father is the ultimate source of everything, the loving and self-communicating foundation of all that exists. The Son, his reflection, through whom all things were created, united himself to this earth when he was formed in the womb of Mary. The Spirit, infinite bond of love, is intimately present at the very heart of the universe, inspiring and bringing new pathways. The world was created by the three Persons acting as a single divine principle, but each one of them performed this common work in accordance with his own personal property. Consequently, “when we contemplate with wonder the universe in all its grandeur and beauty, we must praise the whole Trinity”.[169]

239. For Christians, believing in one God who is trinitarian communion suggests that the Trinity has left its mark on all creation. Saint Bonaventure went so far as to say that human beings, before sin, were able to see how each creature “testifies that God is three”. The reflection of the Trinity was there to be recognized in nature “when that book was open to man and our eyes had not yet become darkened”.[170] The Franciscan saint teaches us that each creature bears in itself a specifically Trinitarian structure, so real that it could be readily contemplated if only the human gaze were not so partial, dark and fragile. In this way, he points out to us the challenge of trying to read reality in a Trinitarian key.

240. The divine Persons are subsistent relations, and the world, created according to the divine model, is a web of relationships. Creatures tend towards God, and in turn it is proper to every living being to tend towards other things, so that throughout the universe we can find any number of constant and secretly interwoven relationships.[171] This leads us not only to marvel at the manifold connections existing among creatures, but also to discover a key to our own fulfilment. The human person grows more, matures more and is sanctified more to the extent that he or she enters into relationships, going out from themselves to live in communion with God, with others and with all creatures. In this way, they make their own that trinitarian dynamism which God imprinted in them when they were created. Everything is interconnected, and this invites us to develop a spirituality of that global solidarity which flows from the mystery of the Trinity.

VIII. QUEEN OF ALL CREATION

241. Mary, the Mother who cared for Jesus, now cares with maternal affection and pain for this wounded world. Just as her pierced heart mourned the death of Jesus, so now she grieves for the sufferings of the crucified poor and for the creatures of this world laid waste by human power. Completely transfigured, she now lives with Jesus, and all creatures sing of her fairness. She is the Woman, “clothed in the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars” (Rev 12:1). Carried up into heaven, she is the Mother and Queen of all creation. In her glorified body, together with the Risen Christ, part of creation has reached the fullness of its beauty. She treasures the entire life of Jesus in her heart (cf. Lk 2:19,51), and now understands the meaning of all things. Hence, we can ask her to enable us to look at this world with eyes of wisdom.

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“Laudato Si'” a Canticle the Pope Takes Figuratively? I Doubt That

The below are two paragraphs from an article linked to from the Drudge Report. Unless you are completely blinded by the powers that control the world, the words in these two paragraphs set the stage for some real comedy.

St. Francis of Assisi’s hymn Laudato Si’ spoke of “Brothers” Sun and Fire and “Sisters” Moon and Water, using these colorful phrases figuratively, as a way of praising God’s creation. These sentimental words so touched Pope Francis that he named his encyclical after this canticle (repeated in paragraph 87 of the Holy Father’s letter).

Neither Pope Francis nor St. Francis took the words literally, of course. Neither believed that fire was alive and could be talked to or reasoned with or, worse, worshiped. Strange, then, that a self-professed atheist and scientific advisor to the Vatican named Hans Schellnhuber appears to believe in a Mother Earth.

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Satanic Verses of Climate Change

1. “LAUDATO SI’, mi’ Signore” – “Praise be to you, my Lord”. In the words of this beautiful canticle, Saint Francis of Assisi reminds us that our common home is like a sister with whom we share our life and a beautiful mother who opens her arms to embrace us. “Praise be to you, my Lord, through our Sister, Mother Earth, who sustains and governs us, and who produces various fruit with coloured flowers and herbs”.[1]

2. This sister now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her by our irresponsible use and abuse of the goods with which God has endowed her. We have come to see ourselves as her lords and masters, entitled to plunder her at will. The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also reflected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life. This is why the earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor; she “groans in travail” (Rom 8:22). We have forgotten that we ourselves are dust of the earth (cf. Gen 2:7); our very bodies are made up of her elements, we breathe her air and we receive life and refreshment from her waters.<<<Read Entire Encyclical>>>

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Persecution: Behind Pope Francis’ Embrace of Cuba’s Murderous Dictator

Pope Francis gave the dictator a copy of his 2013 apostolic exhortation titled “The Joy of the Gospel,” in which he sharply criticizes economic freedom. Talk about preaching to the converted. As Raúl put it, “The pontiff is a Jesuit, and I, in some way, am too. I studied at Jesuit schools.” No kidding.

Source: Persecution | No Spin Catholicism

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Is Pope Francis a Wolf Lover?

The new pope fashions himself in the likeness of Saint Francis of Assisi, that’s why he chose the name of Pope Francis I (already the nickname Franky I is showing up).

So who was Saint Francis? Saint Francis was called the patron saint of animals and the environment. As a matter of fact Pope John Paul II honored St. Francis by titling him as the Patron Saint of Ecology. How thrilling! I was in the woods early this morning flogging myself and chanting to the forest that our savior had arrived.

However, one of the fairy tales that go along with St. Francis has to do with wolves:

Francis had compassion upon the townsfolk, and so he went up into the hills to find the wolf. Soon, fear of the animal had caused all his companions to flee, though the saint pressed on. When he found the wolf, he made the sign of the cross and commanded the wolf to come to him and hurt no one. Miraculously the wolf closed his jaws and lay down at the feet of St. Francis. “Brother Wolf, you do much harm in these parts and you have done great evil,” said Francis. “All these people accuse you and curse you…But brother wolf, I would like to make peace between you and the people.” Then Francis led the wolf into the town, and surrounded by startled citizens made a pact between them and the wolf. Because the wolf had “done evil out of hunger, the townsfolk were to feed the wolf regularly. In return, the wolf would no longer prey upon them or their flocks. In this manner Gubbio was freed from the menace of the predator. Francis even made a pact on behalf of the town dogs, that they would not bother the wolf again. Finally, to show the townspeople that they would not be harmed, Francis blessed the wolf.

So, I guess all you proponents of wolf control and stricter management, better stock up on wolf food so you can feed the wolves and be their friends.

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