July 22, 2019

One Man Killed One Injured In Mountain Lion Attack – He Failed to “Look Big”

The insanity is fully entrenched. We’ve been convinced that we MUST coexist with such man-eating predators like mountain lions, grizzly bears, wolves, etc. and that these animals rarely bother anybody.

In this report of a man, out mountain biking in Washington State when attacked and killed by the lion, it is stated that: “People who encounter a mountain lion should not run from it, Mountain Lion Foundation officials said. Instead maintain eye contact, stand tall, look bigger by raising your arms or opening your coat, wave your arms slowly, speak firmly and throw items at the animal if necessary.

“Most cougars will move on if given the room and opportunity, according to the foundation. A person who is attacked should fight back; most people succeed in driving the big cat away.”

Who are they trying to kid anyway? “Most cougars” will move on? Right! That’s because the cat is offended by the smell of human waste as the person, who has been instructed on how to fight a cougar, just shit himself and the cat doesn’t care much for the taste of the excrement.

It is rare that a person being attacked by a mountain lion, grizzly, or wolf has the collective wherewithal to follow the instructions of looking the cat in the eye, looking big, waving your arms – slowly of course – speaking firmly, and throwing things.

And all of this for what reason? To protect the damned cat? Why? That cat is in direct conflict with the existence of these two men who got attacked and one died. Don’t you get it? You’d rather DIE, mauled to death by a vicious predator, in order to protect it? Something wrong with your head if that’s what you think.

The advice suggests to “throw items at the animal if necessary.” What? Is that like an absolute last thing? God forbid somebody throws an “item” that injures the poor cat?

Sane people, choosing to go into the woods to recreate where there are large predators, historically known to attack and kill people, regardless of what the perverted animal rights people and environMENTALists say, should go prepared to “throw items if necessary” like 240-grains of lead out the muzzle of a .44 magnum pistol.

I like living. I’ll be damned if I’ll give up that life just to protect an animal.

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Colorado Has Too Many Black Bears – We Told You So

*Editor’s Note* – When Colorado decided to effectively ban every method to legally harvest black bears, with the exception of one man and one rifle, we warned the public and officials that when social demands, orchestrated by the environmentalists, remove the tools necessary for wildlife managers to control wild animal populations, problems like those now appearing in Colorado would persist.

This is the same message that many of us sent to voters in Maine who, thankfully, opted not to do away with the hunting and trapping tools needed to keep bears in check. Now Colorado is considering increasing bag limits on bears and/or lengthening the season. Good luck with that. Maybe they should consider repealing the ban and allowing baiting and hounding.

The Post Independent reports higher numbers of bear-human conflicts has led to more relocation of the animal, but more relocations have led to less available locations for more relocations. According to the newspaper, Parks and Wildlife has relocated six bears and put down 17 this year in Management Area 17, which includes Glenwood Springs, Carbondale and most of Pitkin and Eagle counties.

Parks and Wildlife District Manager Dan Cacho told The Post Independent relocation gets complicated when that many incidents occur in one spot because officials want to move the bears “at least 100 miles away” but still need to keep them in Colorado.”<<<Read More>>>

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NJ Man [Exit 29] who Shoots 3 Problem Bears gets $4,000+ Fines and Fees

In October, 2014, a 76-year-old New Jersey resident shot three problem bears on his property.  One was an adult sow that was on his deck and looking in through his sliding glass door.  The location of the two juvenile bears when they were shot, is disputed, but was either on the deck or close to it.  Bears are more dangerous as they are larding up for the winter hibernation.

Bears that display this level of familiarity with humans, who associate humans with food, are a severe problems waiting to happen.  It is why the conservation community has come up with a well used phrase: A fed bear is a dead bear.

Source: NJ Man who Shoots 3 Problem Bears gets $4,000+ Fines and Fees

BearMoose

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Fascist Fish and Wildlife Service Responds to Red Wolf Attack on Horses

In typical fascist form, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service responded to threats of legal action by the owners of the two horses that were attacked by illegally introduced “red wolves” in North Carolina. One horse was slaughtered and the second was seriously mauled.

According to information provided to me by friends and neighbors in North Carolina, who have been working feverishly to somehow force the United States Government of obey their own laws and remove the illegal, hybrid/cross-bred, semi-wild canines, admit their mistakes and take responsibility for their actions – the latest being this attack on two horses.

The owners have contacted the USFWS and have at least solicited compensation for their loss at the hands of “GI Wolves.” This is the response from the USFWS:

USFWSResponseHorse

But this apparently NOT what the USFWS makes available for information that should apply to this case.

Protocol1

Protocol2

As is typical of the “new” U.S. Government that we are seemingly subservient to, the Government makes up their own rules as they go along in order to continue to promote their own agendas and pet projects without interruption by U.S. government contracted slaves.

Evidently most people like being treated that way.

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Wolves killed in Victoria Beach – Wolf/Coyote Crossbreeding

Their remains were taken to the provincial veterinary lab for an examination, including checking their stomach contents, estimating their age and using samples of hair and tissue to determine their genetic structure. (There have been reports of wolf-coyote breeding.)[emphasis added] He said relocating the wolves wasn’t feasible.

Source: Wolves killed in Victoria Beach – Winnipeg Free Press

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Wolf Sermons by the Head Druid

By James Beers

*Editor’s note – In order to understand Jim Beers’ following article and rebuttal, readers must first read the article in the Pioneer Press that Beers refers to. Below is a short teaser and a link to the article, followed by Jim Beers’ response.

“”What it sounds like is a dog chasing a car, doesn’t it?” quipped David Mech, a senior research scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey and one of North America’s foremost wolf experts.

Mech, who has been briefed on the Voyageurs wolf, said the behavior is a mystery to him. Almost invariably, wolves avoid motor vehicles, he said.

“Wolves doing things like this can end up being killed, either by accident or intentionally,” Mech said.”<<<Read More>>>

Today’s Sermon from, “Book of Wolves, Chapter 6, Verses 2-7”

“Playing”? “Practicing” for what? “Inconsistent with territorial behavior”? “Unlikely mating (one would hope not!) or denning behavior”? “Not chasing” but “playful”??? “Not aggressive”?

Telling us there “is no record of a rabid wolf in Minnesota”, is like having a Doberman breeder (i.e. one who sells Dobermans) tell us there has never been a case of a rabid Doberman in (fill-in-the-blank). As if rabies doesn’t happen in a “Nice” state like Minnesota because… of the ticks that killed all the moose (?) or climate change that is killing the deer (?) or some mysterious and sacred secret that only more funding for DNR/State University research will one day uncover?

Does our top Wolf Druid only know of one Canadian incident of a wolf chasing a vehicle? Has he not heard of the Idaho schoolteacher chased on his bicycle on the Alcan Highway by a snapping wolf and only saved by a semi-truck driver the summer before last? (“Haven’t seen before”?)

Alas, the best advice the Head Druid gives is, it’s a “mystery to him”. He is concerned that the wolf “might end up being killed”?

And lastly, he thinks it “sounds like a dog chasing a car”! To quote old Sherlock Holmes frequent reply to Watson, “Precisely my dear Watson!”

Wolves, coyotes and dogs interbreed frequently to produce fertile offspring. In addition to sharing this commonality, they share behavioral traits. While free-roaming dogs chasing cars and kids on bikes is not unusual, acting as if protected wolves (Ergo, comfortable around people and human habitations) might not do such things or might not do such things more often; is like saying there has NEVER been a rabid wolf in any state as if back when Indians were here they recorded such things or while early settlement (and the necessary wolf control gained steam) wolves were examined when found dead or shot. There are numerous accounts of rabid wolves in Army Fort records and small town newspapers in other Territories and States. All wolves and all unvaccinated dogs plus all other mammals (raccoons, skunks, foxes, coyotes, etc.) get rabies everywhere the rabies virus emerges in ANY STATE, COUNTRY, AND CONTINENT (except Antarctica). Saying there has never been rabies in Minnesota wolves is like saying no one ever ate a hot dog at a baseball game!

While it sounds cute to say a wolf chasing a snowmobile is like a dog chasing a car. Avoiding the old joke, “what will he do with it when he catches it (?)”, there are some very real differences. First, the snowmobile driver is right there in the open where he is available to a snap or bite by the wolf.

Second, think for a moment about those free-roaming dogs of yore that chased bikes. They frequently bit the kids. Now the kid would stop and go at the dog that would frequently run home or the kid would outrun the dog. Let us do an autopsy here about dogs like the Cardinal Druid above did for wolves. Would you ask “was it ‘playful’”? Even though it bit the kid, it could have been simple protection of the dog’s territory and perhaps really the fault of the kid. Would we be worried that the chow that bit the kid was one of many unmarked chows and that any of them might be “killed”? Would we go to some far-off academic/bureaucrat/”expert”, like one of those cartoons of some guy climbing a high peak to ask some old geezer contemplating his navel, “what caused this”(?); “what must we do”(?) “Oh high priest”? The fact is that dogs (some (?). all (?) or most chase cars and bikes. When they see other dogs doing it (like free-roaming dogs join in killing/chasing sheep or a foal in a pasture) they join in. AND when the dogs drag down or chomp onto the critter or critters that can’t fight back, they all do likewise until all the prey is dead. Anyone that believes (much less pontificates that as an expert it is undocumented and unlikely that a 100-150 lb., unvaccinated, wild wolf and other wolves witnessing this behavior of chasing snowmobiles won’t join in for whatever anthropomorphic reason preached by our Druid and soon enough pounce on the driver or tip the snowmobile or cause it to roll and then jump on the driver and the machine like a greyhound dog that just ran down a coyote and doesn’t stop biting and snapping until the coyote is dead ) – well I wouldn’t send my wife or kids to him for advice about how to behave around free-roaming dogs or wolves roaming the neighborhood at night.

Isn’t it funny how the very same people that want wolves everywhere (else) are the same folks demanding that all dogs be leashed at all times; and all dogs must be vaccinated; and that when they see a “loose” Labrador retriever out the kitchen window immediately call 911 and demand that the same government they want to introduce and protect wild, very large, aggressive, unvaccinated wolves (elsewhere) immediately capture and remove the free-roaming dog out the back window in their neighborhood?

Thankfully we have our Druids and “a team of park officials, including an expert researcher, on Tuesday headed into the park to attempt to track the wolf and learn more about its behavior.” I feel so relieved that if I had one of those old Southern “swooning couches” I’d take a nap.

As if all this news twaddle wasn’t enough, I have tried to reason in the past with the novice “outdoor” writer that wrote this before about these matters but to no avail. Then, as I went online this morning to copy the newspaper article, an interview by an animal “rights” activist with Wayne Pacelle, the CEO and Titular Head of The Humane Society was played on my computer as I called up and copied the article. They were talking about the “sex”-seeking hunters, wolf trophy “hunting” as some sort of fantasy, how wolves kill and control harmful species like beavers, blah-blah-blah.

So the St. Paul newspaper employs a guy that never hunted or fished to write the “outdoor” stuff; he writes wolf apologetics with copious quotes from a guy that has made his fortune from imposing wolves and the newspaper posts it online with a recording of Wayne Pacelle and one of his acolytes spewing every manner of lies and innuendoes about wolves and those opposed to their presence. Beam me up Scotty!

Finally, when someone dismisses what I write as merely vicious diatribes by a bitter ex-Fed, ask yourself how do you oppose liberal newspapers, naive writers, self-serving bureaucrats, and propagandizing academics that are even more sarcastic and demeaning? As with ISIS & Iran, some will say talk to them or find them jobs; others will say, take no prisoners. I am, proud to say, in the latter group.

Jim Beers
4 March 2015

If you found this worthwhile, please share it with others. Thanks.
Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC. He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands. He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC. He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority. He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.
Jim Beers is available to speak or for consulting. You can receive future articles by sending a request with your e-mail address to: jimbeers7@comcast.net

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Wolves’ Technique: Lure Pets Into Ambush

“This past weekend, wolves attacked and killed a Yukon family’s dog in the Judas Creek subdivision at Marsh Lake.

“One wolf will often come around and dance around and play, the dog will bark and go after it. Once they get a little ways away from houses or people other wolves will show up and that’s the end of the dog.””<<<Read More>>>

In his book, Wolves in Russia: Anxiety Through the Ages, Will Graves writes of this tactic used by wolves to lure domestic dogs into ambush. One would have to wonder if humans are dumb enough to be “lured” away but a wolf, that they don’t know what it is, and get ambushed. Hmmmm.

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‘When Man Becomes Prey’, by local author Cat Urbigkit

New predator book released
‘When Man Becomes Prey’, by local author Cat Urbigkit
by Lyons Press media release
November 9, 2014

Lyons Press is proud to announce the release of When Man Becomes Prey: Fatal Encounters with North America’s Most Feared Predators, by Cat Urbigkit ($16.95, paperback).

Sam Ives’s family set up camp in a Utah campground, cooked dinner, cleaned up and packed their gear away, and climbed into their multi-chambered tent to sleep. It was a great end to Father’s Day. Eleven-year-old Sam crawled into the smaller compartment of the two-room tent. Without his parents knowing it, Sam ate a granola bar and placed the empty wrapper in a pocket of the tent. Sometime during the night, a black bear entered the campsite, ripped open the side of the tent where Sam slept, grabbed the boy, and killed him. His parents heard a noise and got up to have a look around, but were unable to find Sam. Terrified, they immediately called for help and a search was quickly conducted, where Sam’s body was found about 400 yards from the campsite.

Unfortunately, Sam’s story is not uncommon—every year there are numerous reports of predator attacks on humans, many of them resulting in fatalities.

When Man Becomes Prey examines the details of fatal predator attacks on humans, providing an opportunity to learn about the factors and behaviors that led to attacks. The predators profiled in the book include black bears, grizzly bears, mountain lions, coyotes, and gray wolves—the first time all five species have been included in one volume. Compelling narratives of conflicts involving these top predators are accompanied by how-to information for avoiding such clashes.

Cat Urbigkit is an award-winning writer and photographer. She has written ten books, including Yellowstone Wolves: A Chronicle of the Animal, the People, and the Politics and Shepherds of Coyote Rocks: Public Lands, Private Herds, and the Natural World. She maintains the news blog, Wolf Watch [on Pinedale Online!], and contributes regularly to regional newspapers and other outdoors blogs. She lives in western Wyoming.

<<<Source>>>

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Wolves Are Just So Misunderstood

Nasty rotten events involving wolves that wolf lovers refuse to accept as reality, lead us to this news story. A man, who 56 years ago was attacked by a wolf, begins corrective surgery to fix a disfigured face.<<<Read More>>>

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The Continuing Saga of “Rare” Bear Encounters

And always remember, if you encounter a bear (rare – snicker) make sure and “look big.” It’s a magic cure all.

The liars of the Humane Society of the United States and all supporters to end the Maine bear hunt say that bear encounters in places like Colorado have not increased since the state began protecting predators. Whoops! Someone forgot to tell this bear that broke into a Colorado home that happened to be the home of a competitive shooter; a teenage girl. Bang!

However, those “rare” bear encounters take us to Saskatchewan, Canada where a man, who was taking a walk IN TOWN, encountered a bear that chased him down the street. He should have looked that bear in the eye and then “looked big.”

In Vermont, phones are ringing off the hook with a constant barrage of calls from people reporting encounters and incidents with black bears. Rare I guess? Vermonters must be small people.

But, hey! Wait! Is Connecticut starting to learn from reality? In a state crowded with people, so far this year there have been over 4,000 bear encounters with humans reported. One wildlife official was quoted as saying that bear encounters with humans, “happen from time to time.” Gasp! We’ve graduated from “rare” to “from time to time.” However a bear that wandered onto Bradley Field was shot and killed because of public safety with airplanes. I’m surprised that airplanes don’t “look big” enough to scare off a bear. How big does one have to look to ward off a bear?

Now we travel out West. You know more places where the Humane Society of the United States says after ending bear hunting and perpetually protecting predators, there are really no problems with bears. But are those Westerners “looking big” enough? On a beach at Lake Tahoe, a black bear taking a stroll along the beach was eventually killed because it was not using sunblock (joke just in case you haven’t been following along). The people on the beach got together and “looked big” and so the bear wandered over to a remote area of the beach to have some privacy. Bears don’t have a right to sun bathe and so was killed for it.

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