November 18, 2018

Trump/Zinke Love Affair Over

According to Politico, Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke will be stepping down from his post. Politico says he’s leaving because of ethics violation charges. If anything Politico is writing is true, seeking jobs from companies he regulates while still the regulator is like really stupid or something. It is also stated that he has sought a possible job with Fox News (a place he probably belongs).

Whether justified or not, Trump and his administration are in serious trouble. With Democrats in charge of the House, nothing will get accomplished accept more of the repeated efforts to oust the president and all associated with him.

To Secretary Zinke, I say don’t let the door hit you too hard in the ass on the way out. You did little for the outdoor industry except kowtow to those you now seek a job from.

To the Democrats and the Republicans, I say if you are going to oust every cabinet member and politician who has violated your fake “ethics” rules or spent taxpayer money inappropriately, well, I only wish the door would hit you in the ass on the way out.

So, now with Zinke on the way out, taxpayers can expect a replacement by Trump in about two years.

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Cameron (Cam) Sholly Named Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park

*Editor’s Note* – Two items that need attention: First, it would seem that Sholly taking over the position of Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park is a step down from previous work within the National Park Service. Why?

The second issue is that in the following press release Congresswoman Liz Cheney was quoted as saying, “I’m pleased Secretary Zinke moved quickly to name Cam Sholly as the new Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park.” Perhaps while handing out pats on the back to Sec. Zinke for his quick actions to find a replacement for the superintendent he fired, Congressman Cheney should ask Zinke why it has taken a year and a half and still, we have no Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Press Release from the U.S. Department of Interior:

WASHINGTON – Today, National Park Service (NPS) Deputy Director P. Daniel Smith announced the selection of Cameron (Cam) Sholly to be the new Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park.

“As a veteran of the National Park Service, Cam has a track record of working with local communities and Tribes on important wildlife and conservation work and he’s overseen some of the park service’s most high-profile park infrastructure projects in recent years,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Managing our National Parks is a responsibility and a privilege, and I’m confident Cam Sholly will do a fantastic job at Yellowstone.”

“Cam is a proven leader, who has successfully worked at every senior level in the National Park Service including assignments as regional director, associate director, and superintendent,” said Deputy Director Smith. “Most recently, he has overseen the completion of one of the largest public/private partnership projects in NPS history – the $380 million renovation of the Gateway Arch grounds and museum in St. Louis. Cam has built productive and valuable relations with communities, landowners, and local, state, and tribal leaders throughout his career, and I am confident he will continue shaping the right vision for Yellowstone’s future.”

“I am honored to have the opportunity to work with the extraordinary staff and partners at Yellowstone,” Sholly said about the appointment. “Exceptional work has occurred there over the past years because of the dedication of the NPS staff, partners, and communities. I look forward to continuing a positive trajectory for one of the greatest park in the world.”

“Cam has great experience and an understanding of what will make Yellowstone National Park a family destination for all Montanans and its visitors,” said Senator Steve Daines. “We discussed many critical issues facing the park service and I look forward to working with Cam. As a Gardner High School graduate I know he will bring Montana common sense to the job every day.”

“Yellowstone National Park is one of America’s most treasured parks. Together with Grand Teton National Park, Yellowstone is home to a wide variety of wildlife and stunning landscapes, and hosts of thousands of visitors each year. As Cam takes the reins as the incoming superintendent, I look forward to working with him to ensure Yellowstone remains a shining example of our national park system,” said Senator John Barrasso.

“I’m pleased Secretary Zinke moved quickly to name Cam Sholly as the new Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park,” said Congressman Liz Cheney. “Superintendent Sholly’s extensive resume and background within the Park Service will serve him well as he transitions into his new role. I’m looking forward to working closely with the Superintendent to keep Yellowstone one of the Nation’s most beloved parks.”

“Cam has a record of success that will help him manage the first of our nation’s national parks,” said Congressman Greg Gianforte. “Having worked with Cam, I know he understands the importance of being a good partner with neighboring communities. I am confident in Cam’s leadership and am certain he will do an (sic) outstanding job at Yellowstone.”

Since early 2015, Sholly has served as the NPS Midwest Regional Director, and he manages a team of 2000 employees, a budget of over $250 million, and the operations of 61 national park units spread across 13 states. Over the past three years, national parks within the Midwest transferred nearly 800 bison to state and tribal governments through a transparent and collaborative process. During his tenure in the Midwest Region, Sholly also has overseen several major planning processes, including the recent signing of the record of decision to reintroduce wolves to Isle Royale National Park. The region also supported efforts with states to develop wildlife and land management plans, including a plan to address Chronic Wasting Disease in elk populations in South Dakota. He has improved business processes in the region and collaborated with partners on a variety of complex and important park issues. In 2016, Sholly also established a regional Office of American Indian Affairs, to build stronger tribal relations across the region.

From 2012-2015, Sholly served as the Associate Director for Visitor and Resource Protection at NPS headquarters, where he managed a national portfolio that included wilderness stewardship, fire and aviation management, risk management, public health, ranger law enforcement, regulations, and the United States Park Police. As Associate Director, Sholly guided the development and implementation of a national employee safety strategy which has helped dramatically reduce employee fatalities across the bureau. He also approved new national policies for wilderness stewardship, law enforcement, wildland fire, and many other NPS programs.

From 2009-2012, Sholly served as the Superintendent of the Natchez Trace Parkway, overseeing NPS operations within a 444- mile, three-state corridor that includes 25 counties and 20 communities, with approximately 6 million visitors annually. In 2011, Sholly was named superintendent of the year in the Southeast Region for his sustained partnership and business planning efforts within the corridor.

Sholly’s other previous assignments include: Chief of Staff and deputy to the Associate Director for Visitor and Resource Protection; detail as Special Assistant to the NPS Director; and Chief of the Ranger Operations Branch in Yosemite National Park. Sholly is a U.S. Army veteran who served in both infantry and combat military police assignments. He was deployed to Operation Desert Shield/Storm in 1990-1991.

Sholly has a Master’s Degree in Environmental Management from Duke University with curriculum concentrations in environmental economics and law and policy. He earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Management from St. Mary’s College of California, and is a graduate of the Harvard University Senior Executive Fellows Program.

In 2015, Sholly was awarded the Department of the Interior’s Meritorious Service Award for his executive leadership actions. He has been married for the past 21 years to Jill Walston Sholly. They have a high school-aged son.

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Zinke Signs Secretarial Orders to Increase Recreational Opportunities on Public Lands and Waters

Press Release from the Department of Interior:

*Editor’s Note* – Please note the actual intent of the Secretary’s orders. Nothing he is establishing creates any new or expanded recreational opportunities on Public Lands. He is merely designating certain Interior personnel to come up with some suggestions.

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke today signed two secretarial orders continuing his efforts to prioritize the Department of Interior’s recreation mission and increase access to public lands.

Secretarial Order 3366 directs certain Interior bureaus to create and deliver plans to the Department within 90 days that focus on developing or expanding recreational opportunities on public lands and waterways. This order also directs bureau heads to designate one full-time employee charged to oversee recreational opportunities.

“From my first day on the job, I have made it abundantly clear that we are going to refocus on Interior’s long-standing but recently forgotten recreation mission,” said Secretary Zinke. “We are incredibly fortunate, as Americans, to have amazing public lands and waters to carry out our tradition of outdoor recreation but the Department must continue to create opportunities to increase access for these pursuits.”

“We are delighted by the Secretary’s actions to put in place what he has pledged: a system that will elevate the priority of outdoor recreation on public lands and waters managed by the Department of Interior,” said Thom Dammrich, the President of the National Marine Manufacturers Association. “The Secretary’s action recognizes the importance of outdoor recreation for our economy, particularly rural economies, and for the physical and mental health of all Americans. His actions today will help grow outdoor recreation and ensure that fun in the outdoors remains central to the American lifestyle. The Outdoor Recreation Roundtable pledges our support to the Secretary in his efforts to elevate the Department’s commitment to outdoor recreation.”

“Outdoor recreation is an economic engine that produces 2% of the U.S. GDP and is growing at a faster rate than the U.S. economy as a whole,” said Frank Hugelmeyer, the President of the RV Industry Association. “With the right public policies, outdoor recreation will continue to be an American economic engine for years to come. Which is why the Outdoor Recreation Roundtable and its member associations applaud today’s announcements by Secretary Zinke as a common sense plan to elevate the importance of outdoor recreation on public lands and waters throughout the Department of the Interior. This is an important step towards improving the visitor experience on public lands and waters across the country.”

“The recreation industry looks forward to cooperating with the department to offer visitors to parks, refuges and other special places great experiences,” said Derrick Crandall, President of the Outdoor Recreation Roundtable. “The result of better and modernized visitor infrastructure which will contribute to a renaissance of rural communities and a renewed commitment by all Americans to the strong conservation ethic our nation has shared with the world. We thank Secretary Zinke for putting a new emphasis on welcoming enjoyment of our public lands and waters and embracing new skills and new ideas to make visits compatible with protecting our natural and historic resources.”

The bureaus are also asked to provide recommendations for improving and streamlining relevant permitting requirements for guides and outfitters and facilitated outdoor recreation providers and to improve contracting processes for recreation-specific concessioners.

“Whether your favorite activity is kayaking on a river, riding an ATV on sand dunes, jogging on a trail or hunting on a refuge—recreating on public lands and waters is good for the mind, body and soul,” said Secretary Zinke. “And it is also incredibly vital to local economies who rely on recreation spending to help create jobs.”

Secretarial Order 3365 establishes the position of Senior National Advisor to the Secretary for Recreation to ensure deliberate and active coordination of recreational policy in the U.S. Department of the Interior. The position will be filled by Rick May, who currently serves as a Senior Advisor to the Secretary.

May, who joined Interior in November 2017, is a retired U.S. Navy SEAL Captain and decorated veteran who served in the Iraq War. Since his departure from active duty in 2010, he has worked with wounded Veterans in various types of recreational activities, helping them to reintegrate back into mainstream America. May is a graduate of Sonoma State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and he also holds a Master of Arts in Human Resource Management.

“Rick is the absolute best person for this job,” said Secretary Zinke. “The work he has done in helping disabled veterans connect with the outdoors through recreation opportunities speaks for itself. As a former SEAL, he has the leadership needed to help the Department chart its course in making recreation a priority again.”

“First, I’m truly honored and grateful for the confidence that Secretary Zinke has placed in me to hold this position,” said Rick May. “The power of recreation can not be overstated, and its ties to overall health and well-being are undeniable. It is my mission to get more Americans out to enjoy our great public lands, and I look forward to increasing access and opportunity for each and every one of them.”

The Secretarial Orders come on the heels of Secretary Zinke selecting members of the newly created “Made In America” Outdoor Recreation Advisory Committee. A primary charge to the committee is to advise the Secretary on public-private partnerships across all public lands, with the goal of expanding access to and improving the infrastructure on public lands and waters.

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Zinke, Trump The Dynamic Duo That Can’t Function

If you should Google “director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,” all you will get is that Dan Ashe is the director dating back to January 19, 2017.

Washington is a shit hole of corruption and despicable ineptitude, controlled and driven by forces far beyond the blind eyes of the ignorant brainwashed public.

Inside the borders of this corporate nation, Rome burns, while Wall Street, as usual, hauls in millions of dollars, and all this administration can do is try to get people to focus on war – war with anybody. It’s what we do.

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Zinke, DOI Continue Inept Ways

Maybe if Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke had a director for the Fish and Wildlife Service, he would have another half-baked brain to help him not screw more things up.

According to a press release issued by the Department of Interior (DOI) it was announced the amount of money each state would be allotted from Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson Excise Taxes. These taxes are paid on designated sporting goods and goes to a coffer within the Federal Government. After entities like the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, an environmental group that basically spends most of its money on finding ways to end hunting, trapping and fishing nationwide, a formula is used to return those excise taxes to each state to be used specifically for promoting and enhancing hunting, fishing and trapping. That formula is based on the amount of money collected and the number of hunting, fishing and trapping licenses sold.

However, in this press release, Maine has not been allotted one red cent. How can that be?

It was pointed out to me that the DOI is planning to give Maine $11.2 million in federal wildlife funds (wherever that money comes from) and was suggested that Zinke will make that announcement when he visits Maine to look over the newly designated National Monument, Katahdin Woods and Waters.

However, is it even legal, according to the laws guiding the Pittman-Robertson and Dingell-Johnson taxes, to exempt any state from receiving the funds that should be coming to them according to that law? It would seem to me that if such a thing were legal, it’s a terrible loophole that could be used as a political tool.

It shouldn’t matter if the DOI intends to give Maine $11 or $11.2 million, by law and by the right thing to do, Maine has excise tax money coming to it and they should get it.

Is this simply some kind of misunderstanding or a misprint? Is the $11.2 million, if it is being sent to Maine, part or all of the money from P-R and D-J? Was Maine left off the press release by error? Is all of this another example of the Trump Administration’s inability to do much of anything right?

Certainly the Federal Government should not be allowed, under any circumstances to exempt any state from receiving funds that should be coming to them. The law wasn’t devised that way and this matter should be corrected.

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Maine Rep. Poliquin’s Letter to Sec. Zinke Concerning Katahdin Woods and Waters

Maine Congressional representative Bruce Poliquin, upon request from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, has written a letter to express his thoughts and concerns going forward in an investigation into the designation as a National Monument continues.

Although repeated polls showed the majority of Mainers, specifically those in the immediate region of the Roxanne Quimby lands, opposed the National Monument (and Park) designation, I’m sure Quimby’s position on the Board of the National Park Service played a significant role in President Obama’s decision to make the appointment of a National Monument. It was first attempted by Quimby to convince the Federal Government to open a National Park. The opposition to such a move was quite significant and so Quimby sought then president Barack Obama to bypass the usual processes and so Obama, with the stroke of a pen, designated the newly formed Katahdin Woods and Waters.

President Trump has since, via Executive Power, ordered an investigation into many land designations, including Katahdin Woods and Waters, to see if anything can be done to remove the designation and if not what might be done to ensure what will be in the best interest of the Maine people.

Interior Secretary, Ryan Zinke, inquired of Rep. Bruck Poliquin, for information about the land and the process of its designation. Poliquin’s letter back to Zinke (included below) presents much of the same arguments used against the designation leading up to Obama’s executive action. However, different from previous thoughts on the issue, Poliquin is asking Sec. Zinke, that should Maine remain stuck with the National Monument, to somehow let Maine be in charge and control over the monument and not necessarily the Federal Government. I’m not sure how that would work, but it is an interesting thought – one I’m doubtful of and probably could not support without knowing more specifics.

Rep Poliquin Letter to Sec Zinke - Katahdin Woods and Waters (1)
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Red Wolf Criminal Enterprise Appears to Remain Unchanged

Man-government is a nonsustaining, useless and corrupt entity that destroys whatever it lays its hands to. Government epitomizes insanity – rinse and repeat. Our insanity comes from thinking we can change it.

But, perhaps it’s partly the blame of a dysfunctional Trump Administration that seems to screw up whatever it lays its hands to, along with the fact that within its dysfunction, Trump’s appointment of Ryan Zinke as head of the Interior Department, can’t seem to get off his lazy backside and announce his pick to head up the Fish and Wildlife Service. After all, it’s been over 4 months and counting. Is it at all possible a real leader at the USFWS wouldn’t even be making such ridiculous proposals at an absurd time like this? Don’t hold your breath.

One thing has become clear to those willing to take off their fake blinders and examine truth, is that Trump cannot and will not keep any of his campaign promises (lies) – but he is no different in that regard than any crooked politician who came before him – that the ALL are crooked. It is a requirement of the position. It has not yet become obvious to his supporters that his works to this point in time are all blather. He talks a big talk and achieves nothing. People don’t even read his Executive Orders and if they do, they can’t understand them. If he’s so mighty, what has changed? I’m thinking nothing has changed and nothing will change, although there was some hope, which is now rapidly waning, soon to be replaced by business as usual and how do we get through 4 or 8 years of thugs and gangsters? Rinse and repeat.

Evidently it is business as usual at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) where babysitters are sucking on their pacifiers and carrying out the corrupt work that preceded them. Talk the talk but then blow it off. An example of such is what to do about the fake Red Wolves?

The USFWS is proposing making some changes to the “10j” rule of the Endangered Species Act in order to do something to change the management strategy of trying to grow a fake red wolf and perpetuate it.

The proposal – or more accurately a request for comments in order to draw up a draft proposal – can be found at this link. Below I have included the portion of the request that contains the USFWS’s options and what they are leaning toward implementing.

In their background information, of course it is fraught with lies. As an example it reads that the USFWS made sure that any “red wolves” that drifted off government land was removed. We know that never happened and as a matter of fact there’s pretty good evidence the criminals at the USFWS knowingly released and/or relocated “red wolves” on private land, which was an illegal act. However, anyone should understand by now that the U.S. Government places themselves above the laws we citizen slaves are expected to follow.

In the proposal it appears the USFWS wants to grow more fake mongrel “red wolves” in “zoos and private” wolf sanctuaries to keep beefing up the population and creating “genetic diversity” among existing fake red wolves. The liars at the USFWS say their management plans will protect further “hybridization” of red wolves and coyotes. They can never do this with the plans they are formulating, and it doesn’t much matter because what they are perpetuating is nothing but semi wild mongrel dogs. Is it that government is that stupid or do they think all of us are stupid enough to think we will never know the difference? I put my money on the latter.

But what’s difficult to understand, but not from a criminal’s mindset, is how the USFWS can, with a straight face, even be considering any proposal for a change of management of red wolves when the U.S. Attorney General’s Office has documentation that proves that the USFWS knew the “red wolves” they were growing and fostering weren’t even red wolves at all? Last I knew, the Attorney General’s office was demanding some answers. (I can’t help but laugh.) This sounds like a corrupt attempt at enhancing the corrupt red wolf program as much as possible before any decisions are made, or that the USFWS, like all government agencies, don’t give a rats ass about laws, rule of law or what, if anything, the U.S. Attorney General’s office will or won’t do. It’s one big fraternity that’s part of the giant rigged system. It will NEVER change.

In addition to all of this, new studies and science – difficult to know if any of it is real – suggest that there never existed any such “subspecies” of red wolf in the first place.

BUT DON’T GO LOOK!

For more information on the evidence to suggest the USFWS knew their red wolves were fake and the non existence of red wolves, use this link and this link. For lots of links to information about the history of red wolves in North Carolina, follow this link.

Proposed Action and Possible Alternatives

In 2013, acknowledging growing concerns from private landowners regarding management of the NEP, the Service and North Carolina Resources Commission entered into a broad canid management agreement, recognizing steps were needed to improve management of the population. Subsequently, the Service contracted an independent evaluation of the NEP project in 2014 and of the entire red wolf recovery program in 2015. From these evaluations, it became clear that the current direction and management of the NEP project is unacceptable to the Service and all stakeholders.

As a result of the findings from the evaluations, the Service is considering a potential revision of the 1995 NEP final rule. Risks of continued hybridization, human-related mortality, continued loss of habitat due to sea level rise, and continued population decline are high and have led to poor prospects for the NEP. Further, the most recent PVA indicates that the viability of the captive population is below and declining from the original recovery plan diversity threshold of 90 percent and could be enhanced by breeding captive wolves with wolves from the NEP project area. Therefore, the Service is considering whether the NEP should be managed with the captive population as one meta-population, whereby individuals could be moved not only from captivity into the wild but also from the wild into captivity. Incorporating the NEP into a meta-population with the captive population will increase the size of the population and introduce the natural selection occurring in the NEP back into the captive population. Therefore, the Service is proposing to change the goal of the current NEP project from solely that of establishing a self- sustaining wild population to a goal of also supporting viability of the captive wolves of the red wolf breeding program (proposed action). Maintaining a wild population fully integrated with the captive wolves also will: (1) Allow for animals removed from the wild to support the necessary expansion of current and future wild reintroduced populations and to improve the genetic health of the captive-breeding program; (2) preserve red wolf natural instincts and behavior in the captive population gene pool; and (3) provide a population for continued research on wild behavior and management.

The proposed revision would recognize that the size, scope, and management of the NEP will be focused on maintaining a wild population on Federal lands within Dare County, North Carolina and on protecting the species by increasing the number and genetic diversity of wolves in captivity. These revisions will allow removal of isolated packs of animals from non-Federal lands at the landowners’ request, incorporation of these animals into the wild/captive metapopulation, and better management of the remaining wild animals in accessible areas to minimize risks of hybridization. Management of wolves occupying Federal lands in Dare County will include population monitoring, animal husbandry, and control of coyotes and hybrids.

The proposed revision would authorize the movement of animals between the captive and wild populations in order to increase the number of wolves in the captive-breeding program and maintain genetic diversity for both captive and wild wolves. This means the captive wolves and the NEP will be managed as one single meta-population.

The draft environmental review under NEPA will consider consequences of a range of reasonable alternatives to the proposed action. We have identified several management alternatives for the NEP:

(1) Maintain the NEP project in its current state. In other words, we would make no revisions to the current 10(j) rule.

(2) Publish a rule eliminating the NEP project. Under this alternative, the red wolves found in the wild would retain their status as a federally listed “endangered” species under the Act.

(3) Revise the existing NEP. We may consider revisions to the current 10(j) rule that vary from the proposed action.

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Bishop Statement on Zinke Appointment of Kate MacGregor to Interior Post

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 6, 2017

Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced the appointment of Katharine MacGregor, former senior professional staff on the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources, as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management at the Department of the Interior. Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) issued the following statement:

Secretary Zinke made a fantastic decision with this appointment. Kate has been a force on these issues and an invaluable resource to our Committee and Capitol Hill for many years. She brings a wealth of knowledge and energy to this important leadership post and will be a tremendous asset to the Department at a critical time. I wish her the very best and congratulate her on this appointment.”

During her time with the Natural Resources Committee, MacGregor’s portfolio included offshore leasing as well as oil and gas issues. In her new role at the Department, she will advise the Secretary and Assistant Secretary on energy development and public land use.

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Outdoors in Maine: Changing of the guard positive for hunters

Over the years since then I have seen scant indication that, to this day, USFWS has in its policy making and agenda setting given a tinker’s dam about America’s hunting community and heritage.

This is about to change.<<<Read More>>>

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Murkowski Welcomes New Interior Orders

Press Release from the Office of Senator Lisa Murkowski, Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources:

New Secretarial Orders Expand Access to Federal Lands, Lift Ban on Lead Tackle and Ammunition

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, today expressed her support for two secretarial orders announced by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke during his first full day on the job.

Secretarial Order 3347 overturns the last-minute Director’s Order 219, which would have banned lead-based products in ammunition and fishing tackle used on Fish and Wildlife Service lands and waters. Director’s Order 219 was of particular concern in the State of Alaska, as many who engage in traditional subsistence activities often rely on equipment that would have been impacted by the ban.

Secretary Zinke also signed Secretarial Order 3346, which reinstated the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council. This order responds to the needs of the sportsmen’s community and will expand and enhance hunting, fishing, and recreational opportunities on public lands.

“Secretary Zinke has wasted no time in taking common sense steps that are widely supported by Alaskans—particularly those who engage in traditional subsistence hunting and fishing on federal lands, and whose ability to gather food for their families was directly threatened by the order he overturned today,” Murkowski said. “I look forward to working with Secretary Zinke on a whole host of issues that are important to Alaskans and sportsmen all across the United States.”

Murkowski is a longtime advocate for sportsmen and women. In the last Congress, she introduced and led the Senate’s bipartisan package of sportsmen’s and public lands related measures. The legislation included provisions that would have protected, expanded, and enhanced hunting, fishing, and recreational shooting opportunities on federal lands.

Murkowski is the chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. More information about the new Secretarial Orders is available here.

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