September 16, 2019

“Laudato Si'” a Canticle the Pope Takes Figuratively? I Doubt That

The below are two paragraphs from an article linked to from the Drudge Report. Unless you are completely blinded by the powers that control the world, the words in these two paragraphs set the stage for some real comedy.

St. Francis of Assisi’s hymn Laudato Si’ spoke of “Brothers” Sun and Fire and “Sisters” Moon and Water, using these colorful phrases figuratively, as a way of praising God’s creation. These sentimental words so touched Pope Francis that he named his encyclical after this canticle (repeated in paragraph 87 of the Holy Father’s letter).

Neither Pope Francis nor St. Francis took the words literally, of course. Neither believed that fire was alive and could be talked to or reasoned with or, worse, worshiped. Strange, then, that a self-professed atheist and scientific advisor to the Vatican named Hans Schellnhuber appears to believe in a Mother Earth.

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Is Pope Francis a Wolf Lover?

The new pope fashions himself in the likeness of Saint Francis of Assisi, that’s why he chose the name of Pope Francis I (already the nickname Franky I is showing up).

So who was Saint Francis? Saint Francis was called the patron saint of animals and the environment. As a matter of fact Pope John Paul II honored St. Francis by titling him as the Patron Saint of Ecology. How thrilling! I was in the woods early this morning flogging myself and chanting to the forest that our savior had arrived.

However, one of the fairy tales that go along with St. Francis has to do with wolves:

Francis had compassion upon the townsfolk, and so he went up into the hills to find the wolf. Soon, fear of the animal had caused all his companions to flee, though the saint pressed on. When he found the wolf, he made the sign of the cross and commanded the wolf to come to him and hurt no one. Miraculously the wolf closed his jaws and lay down at the feet of St. Francis. “Brother Wolf, you do much harm in these parts and you have done great evil,” said Francis. “All these people accuse you and curse you…But brother wolf, I would like to make peace between you and the people.” Then Francis led the wolf into the town, and surrounded by startled citizens made a pact between them and the wolf. Because the wolf had “done evil out of hunger, the townsfolk were to feed the wolf regularly. In return, the wolf would no longer prey upon them or their flocks. In this manner Gubbio was freed from the menace of the predator. Francis even made a pact on behalf of the town dogs, that they would not bother the wolf again. Finally, to show the townspeople that they would not be harmed, Francis blessed the wolf.

So, I guess all you proponents of wolf control and stricter management, better stock up on wolf food so you can feed the wolves and be their friends.

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