January 20, 2022

Trapping: Effective Management Action

Abstract

Many populations of wildlife, including large- and medium-sized predators are increasing in Europe. Trapping can be one way to reduce negative impacts of predators on human interests, such as game species and threatened species, but there is little knowledge of trap usage and motivation behind it. We used a mail survey in Sweden (n?=?3,886 respondents) to compare predator trappers with hunters who used other methods to kill predators, and with other hunters who did not kill predators, in regard to sociodemographics, beliefs, behaviors, and constraints. During 12 months prior to the survey 19 % of respondents had trapped any small- or medium-sized predator, while 15 % of respondents had trapped and 55 % had hunted (without using traps) red fox (Vulpes vulpes), European badger (Meles meles), or corvid birds. Reducing predator numbers was an important reason for hunting predators with traps. Of predator trappers, 97 % had hunted species that were potentially prey of the targeted predators (e.g., roe deer [Capreolus capreolus], hare [Lepus spp.], and grouse), 94 % believed that there were too many red foxes, badgers, or corvids on their main hunting ground, and 64 % believed it to be very important to reduce predator numbers to benefit other game species. We conclude that the use of traps is widespread among Swedish hunters, and that increasing wildlife populations, increased presence of wildlife in urban areas, and management of invasive species calls for effective management actions, of which trapping can be one. (Note: This Abstract is part of the overall study results posted online. For those interested the entire study can be purchased online as well. Learn more about this by following this link.)

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Wolf Slaughters 20 Sheep

“A blood-thirsty wolf in central Sweden went on a killing spree leaving seven animals dead, while a further 13 had to put down as a result of injuries sustained in the attack.”<<<Read More>>>

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In France 6,000 Sheep Dead From Wolves. More Trouble in Italy and Sweden

The wolf calls in the aisles of Agricultural Fair

Large black linen cover pens of sheep and sheep. “Since 6000 our friends, we were eaten by the wolf” or “sheep in mourning”, these were the messages displayed during the passage of the President of the Republic, Saturday, Feb. 22, in the morning.<<<More Google Translated>>>

And more from France here.

In Italy: 60 Sheep Massacred While Grazing

MANCIANO. The shepherds are milking, the predators go, biting two heads and all the other sheep terrified to go die in a ditch. Sixty die in one fell swoop. Loss of killer for the company splits the Sgrilla in the town of Manchester.<<<More Google Translated>>>

Swedish hunters angry over wolf hunt ban

Farmers and hunters in Sweden are crying foul over a wolf hunt ban they say threatens their way of life and may lead to civil disobedience.

“I think we could live with some wolves but not as many as there are now. They’re getting too close to people,” Elsa Lund Magnussen told AFP at her small sheep farm and abattoir outside Karlstad in south-central Sweden on Friday.

She pointed through the driving snow to a wooded area a stone’s throw from her traditional red wooden house and sheds.

“A wolf killed a moose calf just over there a week ago,” she said, shaking her head.<<<Read More>>>

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Sweden’s Problems With Reintroduced Wolves

From Yahoo! News:

“When you know a wolf can turn up on your land anytime, it changes your whole quality of life. You don’t dare let your dogs out in the yard … and people say you need to take a rifle when you walk in the forest!”

There are few differences between Sweden and the USA when it comes to problems with wolves. Sweden, no longer a sovereign state (some may live in denial over that), really has no say over the disease-ridden wolves raising hell in that country. The USA, no longer a sovereign state (many still live in denial of the fact), and the individual states that make up what was once a sovereign union, have no say over what becomes of wolves. All are forced by totalitarian communists to have their right of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness snatched from them over the evil dictates of world rulers and powers, all of which we never see, hear and certainly do not elect.

As with news article after news article, this one from Yahoo! News fails miserably to even mention the human-threatening disease these government-sponsored terrorist wolves carry and disperse on the landscape. Just like when some lying, thieving, corrupt person says, “If you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it…..PERIOD,” so too do we hear the same lying, thieving, corrupt people say these diseases are of no harm to humans.

Well, we know how Obamacare is turning out. You want to wait to get diseased before you do something about it?

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Baiting Wild Game With Sugary Substances Will Cause Bad Teeth…Before You Kill Them

Honest to God! You can’t make this stuff up….or can you?

A reader sent me a link to a bizarre and unbelievable claim coming out of Sweden that it is a bad practice to feed wild hogs sugary substances for bait because it will give them bad teeth. From the link, I tried several times to open the web page where the entire article supposedly is found but was unsuccessful in doing that. Here is that link. Perhaps it will work later.

According to Waznmentobe.com, the original piece said: “But local officials warn that the practice, while increasing the chances of a successful hunt, it increases the risk that the boar suffer from weight problems and poor dental hygiene.”

Evidently, in Sweden, hunters put out “sticky buns” to lure the hogs in in order to kill them. I guess that’s cheaper than a helicopter and paid snipers.

In Maine, hunters use bait in the same fashion for killing black bears. Often the bait for black bears is mostly junk food, i.e. donuts, candy, etc.

The same reader who sent me the link to this illogically reasoned display of mental incapacity, also sent along a picture of a sow bear he shot two years ago. The bear was later discovered to be 23 years old. The picture shows the condition of the bear’s teeth. Do you suppose this bear had been feasting on sugary treats for 23 years and perhaps would have lived to be 103 if she had practiced good dental hygiene?

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