September 16, 2019

Early Orders for Second Edition Legend of Grey Ghost and Other Tales

My son and I are excited to announce the soon to be released Second Edition of The Legend of Grey Ghost and Other Tales From the Maine Woods. The book will be available for purchase soon on Amazon and other book sellers in paperback and electronic editions.

A very popular first edition, prompted us to do a few rewrites making the book an even better read. We think you’ll really enjoy it.

Order now for delivery when orders come in (approximately 2 weeks) and get 25% off the cover price of the book. Get started now. Click on this link and place your order.

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The Largest Otter Ever Recorded

In V. Paul Reynolds’ latest outdoor article, he tells of his discovery of what was left of an old log cabin in Maine’s Aroostock County in the DeBouillie area. Through research he finds out, through a nephew of the cabin’s owner, that the cabin used to be the winter abode of trapper Walter Bolstridge:

The cabin was a trapper’s winter digs. And the trapper, Walter Bolstridge, was my friend’s uncle. According to Floyd his Uncle Walter would hire a bush plane to fly him and his gear into the roadless DeBoullie area in October. He would stay and trap. In March he would come out with his furs in time to make the Annual Town Meeting. Imagine that! What a special breed of man he must have been.

By the way, Uncle Walter may still hold the record for having trapped the largest Otter ever recorded. He got his name in the newspaper. The Maine Fish and Game Commissioner at the time, George J. Stoble, said that the critter, which Bolstridge trapped on the Fish River, was a world’s record otter.

Well, with a lot of help from a friend, who did some of his own research, this is what he found about Walter Bolstridge’s world record otter:

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The Story of “Big Foot” in Maine in 1886

WATERVILLE, Maine — In the same month the Statue of Liberty was dedicated in New York in 1886, a handful of newspapers in New England published stories about a deadly encounter in the Maine woods involving what today likely would be termed “Bigfoot” or “Sasquatch.”

The story of the 10-foot-tall “wild man” with 7-foot-long arms and hair growing all over his face and body was reported in broadsheets of the time after first gracing the pages of the Waterville Sentinel, a weekly paper that no longer exists.<<<Read the Rest>>>

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