November 13, 2018

They Do It for The Animals & The Environment & the Children & …

By James Beers:

USFWS in the News (re: The News Item Following this Short Comment)

The USFWS must be hiring “Top People” from DOJ and the FBI.  Bums just like the “Top People” bureaucrats that stole millions from the PR Excise Taxes to 1) introduce wolves into the Upper Rockies and 2) open an office in California (both of which Congress had refused to authorize or fund in the early 1990’s) and then to smear the rest around in bonus $’s to “cooperative semi-Top People”: we should expect to see this USFWS “official” and his wife get promotions and high-paying retirement jobs while old, white males that favor actual management of renewable natural resources are placed on the 5% List eligible for budget cuts thereby finishing the circle of transforming the USFWS bureaucracy into a banana Republic (Guatemala/Honduras, et al) gang and creating a desert of “diversity” in rural America.

Incarceration? NAAAH!  Firing?  NAAAH!  Reduced Bonus? NAAAH!  Letter of Reprimand? NAAAH!

Transfer to an undisclosed location and job/Loss of Retirement Pension/Loss of Health Insurance/Shunning/Police Notified that you were about to be fired and “may be dangerous”/Character assassination professionally and personally – all of which they poured on me when I testified before the House Resources Committee about the funds stolen from state wildlife programs?   NAAAH!

My only advice to the poor dears is, “don’t look to the representatives of the real victims of your perfidy, i.e. the state wildlife agencies that reputedly represent rural Americans and their interfaces with wildlife. You may think that the state wildlife agencies would at least ask for the money to be replaced in my case just like you might think or in your case to trumpet how much ‘good’ you were doing”.

Take it from one who knows, the state wildlife agencies began morphing into gutless invertebrates (does that mean they are no longer alive?) in the 1990’s.  They ran and hid when it came out they had been fleeced by their federal masters in the 90’s.  It would be a big mistake today to look for them to back you up like a 220 lb. policeman coming into the back door of a bar to help you if a fight breaks out.  The only ones to help you now are your fellow radicals and, if nothing else, your only hope is that your political fellow travelers take the House, otherwise you should be toast and good riddance.

Strong letter to follow.

Jim Beers

25 October 2018

If you found this worthwhile, please share it with others.  Thanks.

Jim Beers is a retired US Fish & Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist, Special Agent, Refuge Manager, Wetlands Biologist, and Congressional Fellow. He was stationed in North Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York City, and Washington DC.  He also served as a US Navy Line Officer in the western Pacific and on Adak, Alaska in the Aleutian Islands.  He has worked for the Utah Fish & Game, Minneapolis Police Department, and as a Security Supervisor in Washington, DC.  He testified three times before Congress; twice regarding the theft by the US Fish & Wildlife Service of $45 to 60 Million from State fish and wildlife funds and once in opposition to expanding Federal Invasive Species authority.  He resides in Eagan, Minnesota with his wife of many decades.

You can receive future articles by sending a request with your e-mail address to:   jimbeers7@comcast.net

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OIG: Wildlife services official helped create grants that financially benefited his wife

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Two Years and Still No Permanent Director of the Fish and Wildlife Service

If you did a Google search looking for information about the Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, you would see that Dan Ashe, one of Obama’s great appointments, is still listed as the director.

Evidently, this lack of any action should send a clear message to all American citizens that the Fish and Wildlife Service isn’t deserving of a permanent director or the 10 minutes it takes to send out a name for confirmation.

Perhaps Trump needs some “intervention” from the Russians to accomplish such a complicated task. (Wink-Wink)

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Hey! Donald Trump!

Maybe if you spent less time on Twitter, you’d do something productive like naming your choice as Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It’s been 5 months. WHAT THE HELL!

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Secretary Ryan Zinke Appoints Utah’s Greg Sheehan as the Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Press Release from the Department of Interior:

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke today announced the appointment of Greg Sheehan to the newly-created position of Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Prior to his appointment, Sheehan served as Director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Service. Sheehan has more than 25 years of experience with the State of Utah working in wildlife and natural resource management.

“We are grateful to have Greg Sheehan join our team and help lead USFWS as we advance a pro-conservation and more collaborative agenda at the Department,” said Secretary Zinke. “His experience and proven record in wildlife service as well as his organizational management skills will be an invaluable asset to the Service and the Department.”

On his appointment, Mr. Sheehan said, “I am thrilled to have an opportunity to work with Secretary Zinke and the great team at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. I look forward to helping promote the fish and wildlife resources in America through collaborative partnerships with states, local government, the sportsmen’s community, and others.”

Prior to joining the State of Utah, Sheehan worked with the Air Force for six years as a civilian, where his focus was on correcting inefficiencies in cost and pricing between the Air Force and major DoD government contractors. Sheehan is a lifelong hunter, angler, and aspiring wildlife photographer. Sheehan will begin in mid-June and will serve as the Acting Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service until a Director is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

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Dysfunctional USFWS Appoints Deputy Director

*Editor’s Comment* -While it appears the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is so dysfunctional it cannot appoint a director to the Service some 5 months after Trump took over in Washington, oddly it seems to have opted to appoint a deputy director to stand in as an interim director until such time as the Trump administration finishes their plundering and mistake-ridden attempts to make people think they will make things better. Time will tell. Isn’t this kind of like putting the cart before the horse?

The information provided says that Sheehan “has been named” but it doesn’t say by whom. Is it Interior Director Zinke who named him? And if he named him, why can’t he name a director and isn’t it a better idea for the director to name his own deputies?

There is no information posted on the USFWS website about this appointment. So far it appears as though we can expect very little from this administration as it pertains to Department of Interior and USFWS issues. If it is taking more than 5 months to appoint a director to the Service, how many years will it take them to carry out other important issues within the Service?

Where there is no vision, the people perish!

From the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.—Greg Sheehan, director of Utah’s Division of Wildlife Resources, has been named deputy director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and as its acting director until one is nominated and confirmed.

“RMEF is pleased to endorse a wildlife professional who supports and understands the issues we face in the American West with wildlife,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “We are pleased to work with Greg and the FWS to secure a better future for our wildlife, hunters and the general public.”

Sheehan served as director of the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources since 2012. A long-time RMEF member, he spent the last 25 years in the natural resources and wildlife management sector. Sheehan has a track record of helping to restore various fish and wildlife species to levels not seen in more than 125 years.

Additionally, Sheehan’s past highlights a focus on advocating for shooting sports, understanding sensitive species issues and working to recruit, retain and reactivate hunters and anglers.

“We appreciate that Greg is a proponent of state management authority and predator management for the benefit of all wildlife. We also appreciate his passion for the outdoors and the outdoor lifestyle as he is an avid hunter, angler, wildlife photographer and advocate of RMEF’s conservation mission.”

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New Study Shows Americans’ Deep Appreciation for Nature, Barriers to Connection

Press Release from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

*Editor’s Note* – If you believe the propaganda that follows, isn’t this just further proof that those who have the most influence in the decision-making process of fish and wildlife agencies, etc. are those who don’t, can’t and won’t enjoy any of it but somehow feel entitled to have and control, if only in their minds. No matter how many magic wands you wave, you will not change this mind set.

Contact with nature is an important part of growing up and linking Americans to one another; competing priorities and other factors impede getting outdoors.

The findings from an unprecedented national study of Americans’ relationship to nature reveal an alarming disconnection, but also widespread opportunities for reconnecting. The results are prompting nature conservation, environmental education, and outdoor recreation leaders to rethink how they work to connect people with nature.

The Nature of Americans National Report: Disconnection and Recommendations for Reconnection reveals important insights from a study of nearly 12,000 adults, 8 to 12 year old children, and parents, and provides actionable recommendations to open the outdoors for all.

Americans encounter a number of society-wide forces disconnecting them from nature. Americans face competing priorities for their time, attention, and money. They live in places that often have more concrete than green space. It is increasingly normal to spend little time outside.

  • More than half of adults report spending five hours or less in nature each week, and most are satisfied with this minimal amount of time. Many parents and older adults lament that children today are growing up with limited opportunities to experience nature.
  • Parents say their 8 to 12 year old children spend three times as many hours with computers and TVs each week as they do playing outside.

Despite these challenges, there is opportunity. Americans of all backgrounds recognize that nature helps them grow healthy, be happy, and enjoy family and friends. Adults and children enjoy their time in nature. They feel affection for nature, are attracted to its beauty, appreciate its resources, and value its role in intellectual and spiritual development.

  • Over three-quarters of adults rate contact with nature as very or extremely important for their physical health and emotional outlook.
  • One-quarter of parents surveyed say contact with nature has improved their child’s weight, attention span, energy, anxiety, asthma or other health outcomes.
  • Three-quarters of adults support increasing the number of programs for Americans to enjoy nature, the outdoors, and wildlife. More than one-half think programs for Americans to enjoy nature and wildlife are underfunded.
  • Seven out of 10 children surveyed would rather explore woods and trees than play on neat-looking grass. Eight out of 10 like activities such as climbing trees and camping.

Restoring Americans’ connection to nature requires overcoming the gap between interest and action.

The Nature of Americans National Report details recommendations for restoring Americans’ connection to nature, including:

  • Pay close attention to—and respond to—adults’ existing concerns about younger generations’ disconnection from nature.
  • For adults and children, promote nature not only as a place for experiences, but also as a place for involvement and care.
  • Assure adults and children that time in nature can be (and even ought to be) social.
  • Support mentorship that extends beyond the parent–child relationship.
  • Carefully consider how different sectors promote what “good” connection with nature is or ought to be.
  • Deepen local experiences in nature near home.
  • For children and adults, use geographically local or familiar activities as a bridge to geographically distant or unfamiliar activities.
  • Provide socially safe and satisfying places outdoors, especially for urban and minority adults and children.
  • Promote experiences in nature that match Americans’ multidimensional values of nature.
  • For adults, promote conservation efforts as a way to improve their overall community and quality of life.
  • Join parents, children, and adults alike in recognizing that expenditures on children’s engagement with nature are fundamentally important investments.
  • Build partnerships among professionals in healthcare, education, urban planning, conservation, community development, and other sectors.

The core premise of these recommendations is that connection to nature is not a dispensable amenity but, rather, is essential to the health, economic prosperity, quality of life, and social well-being of all Americans.

The Nature of Americans is led by DJ Case & Associates. It builds on the late Dr. Stephen R. Kellert’s research on the importance of contact with nature to human well-being. This unique public–private collaborative is sponsored by the Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Disney Conservation Fund, Morrison Family Foundation, Wildlife Management Institute, and Yale University.

More information and reports are available at NatureofAmericans.org.

Following are quotes from collaborators:

“This study will be of great importance to us as we look for ways to best engage Americans of all backgrounds in nature, wildlife conservation and their public lands. It’s our job not only to help friends and families connect their passion for the outdoors with their great National Wildlife Refuge System heritage, but also to ensure that this unparalleled American legacy of public lands stewardship for the benefit of all continues long into the future.”

Jim Kurth, Acting Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
“Americans clearly care about nature and recognize its benefits for their health and wellbeing. Yet alarmingly, The Nature of Americans research findings show it is becoming normal to stay indoors. Our challenge is to work together to reverse that trend and ensure that more of us experience the natural world. These results will help fish and wildlife agencies across the nation encourage more Americans to get outdoors and enjoy fish and wildlife resources.”

Nick Wiley, President, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies
“We are proud to have helped support The Nature of Americans study, which reinforces the importance of developing compelling content and experiences that connect people to the magic of nature. It is so critical that we all work together to help the next generation live happier and healthier lives – while inspiring them to care for the environment.”

Kevin Callahan, Vice President, Corporate Citizenship, The Walt Disney Company
“The Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida is a proud partner in this ground-breaking research. Floridians clearly shared how important their connection to nature is, and how vital it is to continue efforts to instill in our children a love and respect for the out of doors. The results of this remarkable project will have lasting effects for generations to come.”

Richard “Dick” Corbett, Chairman, Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida
“The vitality of our state’s efforts to conserve our wild things and wild places depends on the connection Texans have with the natural world around them. For us to be successful engaging our diverse and burgeoning communities, it is imperative that we understand how people from all ages, backgrounds, and geographies view nature and how they choose to experience the outdoors. The Nature of Americans study helps answer these fundamental questions, giving us much-needed insight about how best to tailor future outreach, programs, and services to meet people where they really are, not where we assume they are.”

Carter Smith, Executive Director, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
“The results and recommendations of this unprecedented study chart a clear path towards happier, healthier lives. Parents and organizations must make outside activities a priority in their lives. Whether at a national park, wildlife refuge, state or neighborhood park, or in the backyard, Americans must connect to nature to fully develop socially and physically.”

Steve Williams, President, Wildlife Management Institute
“We live in a world more and more disconnected from nature, but the growing question—and perhaps the one of most concern—is why. This groundbreaking research delves into the depths of this disconnect with nature to give conservation organizations a glimpse of the hard work that needs to happen to keep conservation relevant in the 21st century. This is a call to action and we must act!”

Sara Parker Pauley, Director, Missouri Department of Conservation
“I’m proud that during my tenure as U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service director, we provided major financial support for this incredibly important research. Now, as president and CEO of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, I’m heartened to see that zoos and aquariums rank among the favorite, most popular, and most memorable nature activities of parents and children, but especially children. Because America is increasingly urban, it is clear that zoos, aquariums, and nature and science centers will become increasingly important opportunities for people to connect to and enjoy the benefits of nature. AZA’s 232 accredited members are ready to run toward this opportunity.”

Dan Ashe, President and CEO, Association of Zoos and Aquariums
“This study illuminates what many of us have known to be true for years — that we enjoy and benefit from our time outdoors, but don’t get outside nearly enough; that access to, and comfort in, nature is divided along racial lines; and that we develop a love for nature when we are able to experience it regularly and socially. Now — armed with data affirming these statements — I am hopeful that we will all take more seriously the importance of connecting children and adults with the natural world. We look forward to supporting the creative and thoughtful programming that this data demands of us.”

Lois Morrison, Executive Director, Harold H. and Adeline S. Morrison Family Foundation
“As one of the foremost non-profit conservation organizations focused on protecting and restoring habitat, Ducks Unlimited is very interested in the results of this important study of Americans and nature. We have long recognized the benefits of the natural world to people and our society, and this outstanding study not only reinforces how important it is, but also informs Ducks Unlimited about how to design our work to help contribute to Americans living healthier and happier lives.”

Dale Hall, CEO, Ducks Unlimited
“The extraordinarily insightful Nature of Americans study illuminates both the longing for and barriers to the natural world, and offers new documentation that will help those who connect children, families and communities to the natural world. For example, the insight that nature experience is so often an intensely social activity, a reminder of a sometimes forgotten key to connecting children to nature. Congratulations to the late Steve Kellert and DJ Case for such fine work.”

Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods and chairman emeritus of the Children & Nature Network

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Outdoors in Maine: Changing of the guard positive for hunters

Over the years since then I have seen scant indication that, to this day, USFWS has in its policy making and agenda setting given a tinker’s dam about America’s hunting community and heritage.

This is about to change.<<<Read More>>>

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House Passes CRA to Restore Alaskan Sovereignty and Local Management on Federal Wildlife Refuges

Press Release from House Committee on Energy and Natural Resources:

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 16, 2017

Today, the House passed H.J. Res. 69 sponsored by Rep. Don Young (R-AK). This joint resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act will overturn the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) rule on “Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska.”

This rule violates three Congressionally passed statutes that have precedence on this particular issue. Here’s the bottom line: Alaska Department of Fish and Wildlife know exactly what they are doing. They know the area. They know the animals. This rule only stops the fish and wildlife system of Alaska from simply doing their job as they know how to do it.” Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) said during floor debate.There are some people who might think this only deals with Alaska. Technically it does, but the problem is if this happens to Alaska this could also happen in any one of the lower 48 states. We’re simply one lawsuit away.”

From the beginning, I said I would do everything in my power to overturn this illegal jurisdictional power grab by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Today, we’re one step closer to delivering on that commitment and eliminating a wrongful seizure of Alaska’s fish and wildlife management authority,” Chairman Emeritus Young stated.I’m thankful to all those that played a role in moving this important resolution of disapproval, including that countless state and local stakeholders that worked with me to fight a very serious and alarming overreach by the Executive Branch. I look forward to seeing the swift consideration of H.J. Res. 69 in the Senate.”

The Federal Lands subcommittee will spend this Congress working on legislation to restore our public lands from the policy of benign neglect that has plagued our public lands to the point that we are losing our forests in the west and that has strained the relationships between our communities and our federal agencies. The resolution sponsored by Congressman Young is an excellent start,” Subcommittee on Federal Lands Chairman Tom McClintock (R-CA) said.

Background Information:

On August, 5, 2016, FWS issued its final rule, which seizes authority away from the State of Alaska to manage fish and wildlife for both recreational and subsistence uses on federal wildlife refuges in Alaska.

The Congressional Review Act empowers Congress to review new federal regulations issued by government agencies. With the passage of a joint resolution and the signature of the president, Congress can overrule a regulation.

Click here for additional information on the rule.

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Alaska Sues U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Over Refuge Predator Program

“The state of Alaska has filed a lawsuit challenging the legality of a federal agency’s restrictions on predator harvests on wildlife refuges and national parks there.

State attorneys filed the lawsuit Jan. 13 in the U.S. District Court of Alaska, claiming new rules adopted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) violate a 1980s law authorizing the state to manage wildlife, impairs indigenous peoples’ ability to harvest food for sustenance, and sets a precedence to restrict future fish and game harvests, intended to be under state control.

The new rules prohibit taking black or brown bear cubs or sows with cubs, taking brown bears over bait, taking bears using traps or snares, taking wolves and coyotes from May 1 to Aug. 9, and taking bears from an aircraft or on the same day as air travel has occurred.

In 2015 the National Park Service (NPS), also under the Department of the Interior, placed similar restrictions on national park lands there.”<<<Read More>>>

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NSSF Calls Foul on USFWS Director’s “Parting Shot” on Traditional Ammunition

“NEWTOWN, Conn. — The National Shooting Sports Foundation® (NSSF®), the trade association for the firearms, ammunition, hunting and shooting sports industries, condemned the decision by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe banning the use of traditional ammunition on Service lands in just five years.

The parting shot, Director’s Order 219, was issued on the final full day of President Obama’s administration. The last-minute action revives an effort the administration undertook eight years ago to ban the use of traditional ammunition.”<<<Read More>>>

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