August 22, 2019

Expanded US habitat protection ordered for rare lynx

*Editor’s Note* – Here is a prime example of what is wrong with everything involved in government. This includes the Court System. Nobody knows what the Canada lynx population is…anywhere. Nobody knows what the lynx population used to be or ever was. However, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, kow-towing to their Environmentalists buddies, list the species as needing protecting, and along with it designating “critical habitat.” In Maine, this designation is beginning to upset the entire managed wildlife structure.

In addition, the judge, who shouldn’t be ruling on such matters, according to this report, ordered the USFWS to designate MORE critical habitat because they didn’t do it five years ago. Make a lot of sense?

For those interested, a copy of the Court’s decision can be found here.

SALMON, Idaho — A federal judge ordered U.S. wildlife managers on Wednesday to enlarge habitat protections in Idaho, Montana and Colorado for the Canada lynx, a rare wild cat that roams the Rockies and mountain forests of several other states.

Chief U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen in Missoula, Montana, ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service erred in 2014 when it revised its critical habitat designations for the lynx with little or no expansion beyond the original plan issued five years earlier.

The Canada lynx, whose large paws make it well adapted to hunting in deep, mountain snows, was listed in 2000 as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.

The lynx is not considered imperiled in Alaska or Canada, where it ranges widely in forest areas, but its population in the Lower 48 states is believed to be small, though actual numbers are unknown, according to government scientists. (emboldening added)<<<Read More>>>

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Alaska Wildlife Managers Say USFWS Rule Violates 1980s Law

State wildlife managers say the new rule “harshly restricts the ability of Alaskans to feed themselves through responsible and sustainable harvest, and is “wholly inconsistent with what the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 promised (Alaskans), which gave the state wildlife management authority on state, private and federal lands.”<<<Read More>>>

Final Rule:

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service or FWS), are amending regulations for National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in Alaska that govern predator control and public participation and closure procedures. The amendments to the regulations are designed to clarify how our existing mandates for the conservation of natural and biological diversity, biological integrity, and environmental health on refuges in Alaska relate to predator control; prohibit several particularly effective methods and means for take of predators; and update our public participation and closure procedures. This rule does not change Federal subsistence regulations or restrict the taking of fish or wildlife for subsistence uses under Federal subsistence regulations.<<<Read More>>>

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Methodology for Prioritizing Status Reviews and Accompanying 12- Month Findings on Petitions for Listing Under the Endangered Species Act

Blowing Smoke Where the Sun Doesn’t Shine!

Below is the Summary of the new “non-binding” proposal to assist the U.S. Fish and Wildlife (dis)Service in keeping up with the demands of environmentalists who use the Endangered Species Act and the petitioning process to make gobs of money. Essentially it doesn’t matter what it says, because the proposal assures us that, “It is not intended to be binding.”

This proposal is only a suggested means of prioritizing which petitions get attention first – sort of a “triage” event. But one has to ask, shouldn’t the Service be doing this on a regular, day-to-day basis?

Oh, yeah! Government!

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce a final methodology for prioritizing status reviews and accompanying 12- month findings on petitions for listing species under the Endangered Species Act. This methodology is intended to allow us to address outstanding workload strategically as our resources allow and to provide transparency to our partners and other stakeholders as to how we establish priorities within our upcoming workload.<<<Read More>>>

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Investigative Report of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Mexican Gray Wolf Program

For whatever the dog and pony show of a fake “investigative report” of the USFWS is worth, you can read and/or download a copy of the report that reads, “This is a version of the report prepared for public release.”

BUT, DON’T GO LOOK!

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Amended Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement To Address the Presence of Wolves at Isle Royale National Park

*Editor’s Note* – I brought to readers’ attention yesterday that environmentalists have petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Endangered Species Act protection for moose in Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and North Dakota. The regions of Michigan included in the petition involves Isle Royale. Does it make sense or is it irresponsible to introduced and perpetuate a wolf population on Isle Royale, the only real threat to the moose when at the same time petitioning the Feds to place the moose under Federal protection? You just can’t make this stuff up.

SUMMARY: The National Park Service (NPS) is amending its July 10, 2015, Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) and Management Plan for Moose, Wolves, and Vegetation for Isle Royale National Park, Michigan (Isle Royale). The NPS is revising the scope of the EIS to focus on the question of whether to bring wolves to Isle Royale in the near term, and if so, how to do so. This amended NOI describes a range of alternatives for bringing wolves to the Island.<<<Read More>>>

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Environmentalists Petition Feds Seeking ESA Listing for Moose

Described as a “subspecies” of moose, the animal in parts of Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota has received attention in the form of a petition to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to place the subspecies (Alces alces andersoni) on the Endangered Species Act list for federal protection.

Readers need to be made aware of certain lies that are always told the people, by both the petitioners and the Federal and State Governments. As an example, the USFWS said in response to the petition, “This substantial 90-day finding initiates a rigorous status review in which the Service will determine whether the species warrants listing under the Endangered Species Act.” It is doubtful this will happen. We already know that the USFWS does not have (at their convenience – wink, wink) the resources to do this and historically, we know they do just as they damn well please. They run rough shod over anything or anybody who stands in the way of them fulfilling their agendas. (Visit the Mexican wolf introduction fiasco)

We also find this enormous lie: “To ensure the process is comprehensive and the final determination is based on the best available scientific and commercial data, the Service has opened a 60-day comment period to solicit relevant information from the public.” There are two important aspects of this statement that are flat out false. One is that the USFWS is seeking “best available science.” They are not and never have. Best Available Science is what they determine works best for them. They hand select whatever information is given to them, if it fits their narrative, and deliberately and irresponsibly disregard the rest. This we have seen often through the history of the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The second aspect is that they are seeking “relevant information from the public.” It is relevant only if they deem it to be so. When I thoroughly examined the Environmental Impact Statement devised by the USFWS as a requirement of introduction of gray wolves into the Northern Rockies (see my book Wolf: What’s to Misunderstand?), it became very clear that all information the USFWS placed front and center was only information that could be used to support their wish to introduce the gray wolves. Every issue that the USFWS listed as unimportant, are, at present, the only important issues that the American people are facing today. What then, does that tell us about this fascist and rigged government structure we are now forced to live under?

Therefore, we all should be made aware that the process that is undertaken by the petitioners, as well as the Federal Government, is a rigged farce. Moose will be listed or not listed depending upon first, what the USFWS wants to do, and second, how much money is in for the petitioners. In reality, the status of the moose is immaterial. It’s about the status of the rigged political process that is the ONLY determining factor. All else is nothing but smoke and mirrors. It’s not about moose. It’s about political ideology.

The environmentalists, pretending that they are actually concerned about the preservation of anything other than their bank accounts, believe that listing the moose as an endangered animal will allow for the needed protections to save the “subspecies.” Because Isle Royale is included in this listing proposal, will environmentalists work to keep moose protected on the island by killing wolves?

As always, we can sit back and watch the dog and pony show. Perhaps the environmentalists need some money and so the USFWS will play their usual game of pretending in order that you and I have to pay some more tax dollars to cover the legal costs of the environmentalists because the Government could not chose not to fulfill their end of the rigged process.

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When Government is in Control

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Proposed Revisions to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Mitigation Policy

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce proposed revisions to our Mitigation Policy, which has guided Service recommendations on mitigating the adverse impacts of land and water developments on fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats since 1981. The revisions are motivated by changes in conservation challenges and practices since 1981, including accelerating loss of habitats, effects of climate change, and advances in conservation science. The revised policy provides a framework for applying a landscape-scale approach to achieve, through application of the mitigation hierarchy, a net gain in conservation outcomes, or at a minimum, no net loss of resources and their values, services, and functions resulting from proposed actions. The primary intent of the policy is to apply mitigation in a strategic manner that ensures an effective linkage with conservation strategies at appropriate landscape scales. We request comments, information, and recommendations from governmental agencies, Indian Tribes, the scientific community, industry groups, environmental interest groups, and any other interested parties.<<<Read More>>>

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands in the Northeast Region; Draft Long Range Transportation Plan

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of a draft long-range transportation plan (LRTP) for public review and comment. The draft LRTP outlines a strategy for improving and maintaining transportation assets that provide access to Service-managed lands in the Northeast Region (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia) over the next 20 years.<<<Read More>>>

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Monarch butterflies make impressive comeback in Mexico’s Wintering Grounds

*Editor’s Note* – The below excerpt can easily be translated this way: We lied to you before and we our friends made gobs of money. We are lying to you again because we our friends are going to make gobs of money. Oh, and don’t forget that we our friends want to control every facet of your lives.

Monarch butterfly population has bounced back as per the data collected from Mexico. Officials at the US Fish and Wildlife Service announced that a surge has been seen in the population of wintering monarchs in Mexico. The progress is positive for monarch butterflies, but experts believe future of the highly recognizable pollinator is still uncertain.

Source: Monarch butterflies make impressive comeback in Mexico’s Wintering Grounds | Maine News Online

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