September 23, 2019

Wyoming Considers Delisting Wolves the Way Idaho and Montana Got Theirs Done

Yes, the precedent was set when certain members of Congress attached a “rider” bill to a Congressional budget bill in 2011 that put wolves in Idaho and Montana off the Endangered Species Act List, also providing a clause that disallowed any legal challenges. Was it the right thing to do? Was it the best thing to do? You decide.

But because it appeared at the time that it was the only way anybody was going to get beyond unrelenting, oppressive lawsuits to get some kind of control over a rapidly growing wolf population, the action of attaching a rider to a budget bill resulted in “delisted” wolves and something that sort of resembles wolf control.

At the time of the rider bill fiasco, Idaho and Montana tossed Wyoming under the proverbial bus leaving them to fend for themselves to gain management over wolves. Wyoming was successful in time but only for awhile, until a Washington, D.C. judge ruled in a recent lawsuit that Wyoming’s wolf management plan was inadequate for further and sufficient protection of the gray wolf. Now Wyoming’s gray wolf population is back under federal protection and Wyoming government and citizens are frustrated because they did everything necessary to gain approval from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Now it appears that some legislators in Wyoming are considering taking the route Idaho and Montana did in 2011, and getting wolves delisted for good and to put a stop, once and for all, to the rash of continued, money-making lawsuits.

“I think we have to consider legislative action now. I don’t see any other recourse,” said U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis. “We have done everything the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service asked of us and more.”

In revealing some of her frustration, Lummis said that it seems that no matter what Wyoming has done, it’s never enough.

“The fact is that no matter what we do and no matter how successful we are at recovering the wolf, certain groups remain unsatisfied and unwilling to accept victory,” Lummis said. “Now it is time to pursue a legislative solution.”

Whether you agree or disagree that attaching a bill to a larger congressional bill, or creating stand-alone legislation, is the right way to go, one has to consider the corner that environmental and animal rights groups have put the rest of citizenry in. Historically, the majority of outdoor sportsmen, landowners, ranchers, etc. are not the protesting sort of people, looking to take every person who looks at them funny, to court and/or insisting the rest of the world live like they do. Environmentalists and their ilk are. Maybe the environmentalists should reconsider where to draw their dictatorial lines in the sand.

A lawyer for Earthjustice doesn’t like the idea of congressional action to stop the lawsuits.

“There are always situations where people in specific areas want to get exceptions from the act for their own localized interests,” Preso said. “But that doesn’t serve the interest of the nation as a whole, which is blessed with an incredible wildlife heritage that still exists today largely as a result of the Endangered Species Act.”

Perhaps Preso should have considered that before running to the activist judges for help making money. Serious argument could be made as to any actions his organization has done has proven to “serve the interest of the nation as a whole.”

Preso also states that we enjoy “incredible wildlife” because of the Endangered Species Act. I, and I know there are thousands more, who would rightfully say that we enjoy this wildlife despite the ESA, but more importantly in spite of fascists organizations like his.

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RMEF: Silver Linings in Wyoming Wolf Management Ruling

Press Release from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

MISSOULA, Mont.-The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation maintains a ruling that restores federal protections to wolves in Wyoming is basically a technicality that can easily be fixed on Wyoming’s end. The State of Wyoming is in the process of adopting an emergency rule to do so.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled out of her Washington D.C. courtroom that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) was wrong to rely on Wyoming’s non-binding promises to maintain a buffer above the FWS minimum of 10 breeding pair and at least 100 wolves outside of Yellowstone Park and the Wind River Indian Reservation. Montana and Idaho initially had the 10 breeding pair and 100 wolf minimum, but a 50 percent “buffer” of 15 breeding pairs and 150 wolves was implemented for those two states.

The plaintiffs argued the following four points about the Wyoming wolf population, and they were denied a favorable ruling by Judge Jackson relative to the first three:

1. Wolves have not recovered.
2. Wolves are at risk because of a lack of genetic connectivity.
3. Wyoming allowing wolves to be treated as a predator in some areas does not meet the Endangered Species Act requirements of protections over a significant part of the species’ range.
4. Wyoming’s current regulatory mechanism to insure a population of more than 10 breeding pair and 100 wolves is inadequate and represents a non-binding promise.

“There are some silver linings within this ruling handed down from Judge Jackson as she ruled against three claims made by the plaintiffs including confirmation of the fact that Wyoming’s wolf population has recovered and is not endangered,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “We anticipate Wyoming will be able to fix the issue with how its wolf management plan is written to satisfy the court.”

“She held that Wyoming’s plan was not sufficiently formalized to support the Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2012 rule allowing limited take of gray wolves. We believe an emergency rule can remedy this, and I have instructed the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the Attorney General to proceed accordingly,” said Wyoming Governor Matt Mead.

The State of Wyoming already asked the court to reverse the ruling. Mead also began the process to make the state’s minimum wolf population pledge legally enforceable by signing and filing an emergency rule. In the meantime, it suspended wolf hunting in the northwest part of Wyoming scheduled to begin in October. The judge’s decision also impacts year-round hunting in the rest of the state as well as landowners protecting livestock and pets.

The latest wolf count indicates a minimum of 320 packs and 1,691 wolves in the Northern Rockies as of December 31, 2013, including at least 306 wolves in 43 packs in Wyoming.

“The real shame of this continuing litigation and legal maneuvering by HSUS, Defenders of Wildlife, Center for Biological Diversity and others is the amount of American taxpayer money the judge may award them for their legal fees, all in the name of the Equal Access to Justice Act. This is a continued misuse of taxpayer dollars for an ideological agenda that has little to do with wolves. This is not conservation work,” added Allen.

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Federal Judge in Washington, D.C. Puts GI Wolves Back Under GI Protection

I could say I told you so but that wouldn’t amount to anything.

This move, believable within the rigged system we are all a slave to, should come as no surprise. Perhaps, and there’s a reason to use the word “perhaps,” had the slimy politics of some, joining forces with Harry Reid and his rigged system, included Wyoming in their corrupt politics of dealing with wolves through budget bill riders, this lawsuit would not have happened. But I suppose, for some, when in Rome, they must do what Romans do.

Regardless, there is no cure. The only possible cure is a dismantling and rewriting of the Endangered Species Act, along with the Equal Access to Justice Act, but then again, within this corrupt totalitarian socialist state of slavery that we have all eagerly entered into, a rewriting would never solve the problem and would only make matters worse.

Perhaps the best solution is no solution at all. Let those who think they are protecting wolves have their way and then we will see.

I have not had time to read and study the ruling of Judge Amy Berman Jackson, but I will provide a link to the ruling and the order, along with a summary of the judgement.

MEMORANDUM OPINION

This case concerns the government’s decision to remove the gray wolf in Wyoming from the endangered species list. Plaintiffs Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, Fund for Animals, Humane Society of the United States, Natural Resources Defense Council, and Sierra Club, in this consolidated case, challenge the September 30, 2012 decision of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (“FWS” or “the Service”) to remove the wolves from the list under the Endangered Species Act (“ESA” or “the Act”). See Final Rule: Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife, 77 Fed.Reg. 55,530 (Sept. 10, 2012) (“the 2012 rule”). The 2012 rule transferred management of the gray wolf in Wyoming from federal control to state control. Id.

Plaintiffs have moved for summary judgment, and they maintain that the decision was arbitrary and capricious because Wyoming’s regulatory mechanisms are inadequate to protect the species, the level of genetic exchange shown in the record does not warrant delisting, and the gray wolf is endangered within a significant portion of its range. Pls.’ Mot. for Summ. J. [Dkt. # 48] (“Pls.’ Mot.”) and Pls.’ Mem. of P. & A. in Supp. of Mot. for Summ. J. [Dkt. # 48-1] (“Pls.’ Mem.”).

The Court will grant plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment in part and deny it in part and remand the matter back to the agency because it finds that the Service could not reasonably rely on unenforceable representations when it deemed Wyoming’s regulatory mechanisms to be adequate. Given the level of genetic exchange reflected in the record, the Court will not disturb the finding that the species has recovered, and it will not overturn the agency’s determination that the species is not endangered or threatened within a significant portion of its range. But the Court concludes that it was arbitrary and capricious for the Service to rely on the state’s nonbinding promises to maintain a particular number of wolves when the availability of that specific numerical buffer was such a critical aspect of the delisting decision.

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USFWS Proposed Lynx Assessment: Increase Critical Habitat in Northern Maine/Wyoming on Private Land

“The lynx was protected under the ESA in 2000, when it was listed as threatened throughout its range in the contiguous United States, due to the inadequacy, at that time, of existing regulatory mechanisms. The Service designated critical habitat for the species in 2006 and revised the designation in 2009 to include habitat in six northern states. The current proposal includes most of the areas designated in 2009, as well as additional private timber lands in northern Maine, and Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service lands in northwestern Wyoming.”<<<Read More>>>

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Veterinarian Warns of “The Wolf Tapeworm”

Powell veterinarian warns of problems that may be spread by wolves

A nasty tapeworm found in Alaskan wolves has turned up in Park County and has infected multiple elk and four dogs, according to a Powell veterinarian.

State and federal officials say the risk of infecting humans is low, but veterinarian Ray Acker, who owns and operates Big Horn Animal Care Center in Powell, said it behooves hunters and dog owners to take precautions to protect themselves and their pets from the parasite.

Echinococcosis granulosus (E. granulosus) can infect and kill humans, but there have been no reported cases of human fatalities in Wyoming.

Acker said he fears it is only a matter of time before the tapeworm’s cysts invade humans and potentially kill them.

E. granulosus tapeworm can infect all carnivores, but wolves and other canines are the primary host. “You could call it the wolf tapeworm,” Acker said.<<<Read More>>>

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Backcountry Safety Course Likely Will Be Incomplete and Ineffective

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department has plans for a backcountry safety course to teach people how to protect themselves against bears, lions and wolves when they, “…get into conflicts with people’s dogs.” And that may be the extent of it.

According to the linked-to article above Wyoming officials admit, “…wolf attacks on people are rare but sometimes wolves get into conflicts with people’s dogs.” Is this suggesting that if you venture into the backcountry without a dog, you will not be attacked by wolves?

Topics include how to use pepper spray and proper food storage. These are all well and good but why not present a complete an honest course on what MIGHT happen in order to properly teach people to be prepared? I just don’t get it.

Missing from this short list is how to be safe from contracting Echinococcus granulosus (Eg) from wild canine scat or other sources.

Will Graves, author of “Wolves in Russia: Anxiety Through the Ages” and canine disease researcher says of the planned safety class, “This is a bit of ‘progress.’ Authorities admitting that wolves can, under circumstances, become dangerous. Also, there is the threat of becoming invected with E.g.”

To which Dr. Valerius Geist, professor emeritus University of Calagary, replied, “Agreed. But it could be better. Time will tell.”

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EPA Takes Land Away From Wyoming

“I understand that the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribes have a different opinion about the Wind River Reservation Boundary. My deep concern is about an administrative agency of the federal government altering a state’s boundary and going against over 100 years of history and law.

“This should be a concern to all citizens because, if the EPA can unilaterally take land away from a state, where will it stop?” Governor Matt Mead said in a press release on January 6.<<<Read More>>>

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RMEF Conserves 3,329 acres of ‘Best of the Best’ Wyoming Elk Country

MISSOULA, Mont.–The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation worked with conservation-minded landowners, who are also long-time RMEF members, to permanently protect 3,329 acres of critical elk habitat along the eastern front of Wyoming’s Laramie Range.

“This transaction not only protects high wildlife habitat values and thwarts the potential threat of increasing development, but it’s also the first conservation easement in Platte County,” said Blake Henning, RMEF vice president of Lands and Conservation. “The location is significant since subdivisions are in the works less than five miles away. This action may encourage nearby landowners to consider conservation over development as they go forward.”

“Conservation easements can play a key role with willing landowners in conserving the ‘best of the best,’” said Ryan Amundson, habitat extension biologist for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. “This property is one of those key properties.”

Located adjacent to the Medicine Bow National Forest, Bureau of Land Management land and State land, the acreage also provides vital year-round forage, water and shelter for mule and white-tailed deer, pronghorn and other wildlife. The easement also provides connectivity of the public lands and contiguous habitat between summer and winter ranges.

Cottonwood Creek and its tributaries meander through the property creating riparian corridors with cottonwood galleries transitioning to mixed grass prairie and shrub-steppe habitat.

“The open ridges, in combination with the Wheatland area’s famous winds, provide open foraging areas in winter months for all these mentioned species,” added Amundson. “Thank you to RMEF for your efforts in keeping agricultural lands and important wildlife habitats intact in southeastern Wyoming.”

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Hitler Discovers He Didn’t Draw Wyoming Hunt Tags

VIDEO HUMOR:

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RMEF Grant to Help Wolf Management in Wyoming

*Editor’s Note* This editor acknowledges the money and effort the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation puts into wildlife and habitat programs in the United States. It is this editor’s opinion that doling out money to any fish and game department for the purpose of, “better implement management techniques” for wolves is idealistic and ineffective. This editor also understands the politics involved with today’s wildlife management and can only hope that one day game management can return to a rational form of scientific implementation.

So long as wolves are treated as a game species and “managed” accordingly, most all other wildlife species will suffer. How long will it take, if ever, before this fact is realized?

MISSOULA, Mont.–A $50,000 grant from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will assist the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) with its wolf management plan.

The funding will expand WGFD’s knowledge of predator-prey interactions between wolves and elk. It will also expand the radio collar program to help managers better understand the home range, territory size, pack size and other biological traits and actions of the wolf so they can better implement management techniques.

“It is vital that state agencies have a firm grasp on predator populations in order to properly implement science-based management practices,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “This grant will help WGFD gain more knowledge to better understand its wolf population so it can better implement its approved wolf management plan.”

“Our partnership with the RMEF is extremely valuable to us and this grant shows how this relationship continues to develop great opportunities for conservation,” said Tom Ryder, Wildlife Assistant Division Chief for WGFD. “This grant will help the Department execute its adaptive wolf management plan by helping to increase our knowledge of wolf/elk interactions, wolf home range, and pack and territory size. Each of these biological components is important for the management plan and to our shared constituents.”

In keeping with the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, RMEF supports state-regulated hunting and trapping as the preferred tools of wolf management. RMEF staunchly supports management to balance and control wolf populations.

“We maintain our longstanding commitment to and support of the goal of state management which is to sustain all wildlife species on balance with the available habitat and the local communities where so many of us live,” added Allen.

RMEF also remains committed to learning more about wolves through research efforts. Since 1989, RMEF invested nearly $664,000 in research grants to advance scientific understanding of wolves, wolf interactions with other species, and overall wolf management. The total includes $174,079 in Wyoming-specific research projects and more than $200,000 in science grants in just the past five years. Most of the contributions paid for independent research by leading universities, state and federal wildlife conservation agencies and tribes.

“Part of RMEF’s mission is to ensure the future of elk and other wildlife,” said Allen. “This grant helps managers do just that in Wyoming by helping them know how many wolves are out there, where they travel and what effect they have on elk, deer and other ungulates.”

RMEF will allocate nearly $2.9 million for elk and wildlife-related conservation projects in 27 states with wild, free-ranging elk populations in 2013. Additionally, $570,000 will also be allocated to hunting heritage programs in 49 states.

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