September 28, 2020

THE AFTERMATH OF THE NOTORIOUS ZIMBABWEAN LION HUNT

Africans seemed to be quite surprised about the uproar. Zimbabwean citizen Goodwell Nzou wondered in an opinion piece in The New York Times of 5th August “Cecil who? When I turned on the news and discovered that the messages were about a lion killed by an American dentist, the village boy inside me instinctively cheered: One lion fewer to menace families like mine.”Why is it, that despite of the millions of visitors to national parks, the protected areas are usually running at a loss and have to be subsidized by the taxpayer? And why is it that many remote hunting concessions have well-functioning anti-poaching and community conservation programs in place? Why are places, less scenic and attractive than those of the up-market game lodges in national parks, still harboring wildlife and have not been converted to agricultural land or livestock grazing grounds? Could it be that hunting, albeit removing a few individuals from locally thriving wildlife populations, provides more attractive returns for the landowners?

Source: THE AFTERMATH OF THE NOTORIOUS ZIMBABWEAN LION HUNT | African Indaba

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Sport hunting helps conserve African wildlife habitat

By Richard Estes

I’m writing in defense of sport hunting in Africa from the viewpoint of a biologist who has devoted half a century to studying, writing about and promoting conservation of its unequalled wealth of “big game.” International outrage over the killing of Cecil became viral when photos of this superb blackmaned lion, an icon in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park, illustrated accounts in the social media that it was lured out of the park and wore a satellite collar attached by Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCru). The director, Prof. David Macdonald, one of the most dedicated researchers and conservationists of African wildlife, has defended Wildcru’s cooperation with professional hunters, and so has Panthera, another highly respected international organization devoted to conservation of the big cats. The fact that the killing of Cecil led anti-hunters to donate more than half of a million dollars in support of Oxford’s lion research and conservation program, strikes me as one of the ironies surrounding this episode.<<<Read More>>>

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