September 24, 2019

Bobcat Wrestles With Deer

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

I was sent a series of photographs of a bobcat attempting to get a meal made out of deer meat. The pictures are remarkable if for no other reason than someone was able to capture on film a bobcat, one that appears to be of some size, attempting to get a grip on a deer and haul it away for safe munching.

It is obvious from the first of just two photos that I will include, that the photos were taken from inside a vehicle. Thus, this event took place roadside.

I’m not an animal forensic expert and don’t want to pretend to be one. I would like however to at least raise a couple of questions, not to somehow discredit the photographer or the little bit of information contained in the email I received, but to help understand exactly what this event is.

When I received the photos, in one of the many “forwarded” emails, it was written that these were pictures of a bobcat taking down a deer. I have some doubts that that is what is going on – not that I don’t think a bobcat is capable of taking down an adult deer.

If this was an attack site, I would expect to find blood – at least some. On snow, and this snow appears rather fresh, red blood would easily show up. In looking at all the pictures, it seems that the deer might have been at this location for awhile as at least some degree of stiffness has set in.

The photos indicate this is beside a road, at least a road that is plowed which leaves me to think maybe this is road kill and the bobcat is being opportunistic.

There could be reasonable explanations for the questions I have provided and would like to hear them if readers would like to share. Things I don’t know about is what the temperature was outside at this time, whether there are drag marks through the snow to indicate if this deer was dragged to this point by the bobcat, or something else, before he was caught on camera.

Regardless, these are quite remarkable pictures and I am grateful for being the recipient of the sharing.

Perhaps the take away from this is another example of why bobcats should be classified as viable, large predators.

Bobcat1

Bobcat2

Share