October 23, 2020

Wyoming: Wolf Free Zone and Game Populations Disappearing

Below are some interesting charts, graphs, and data about wolves and the effects they are having on Wyoming’s big game populations of moose, elk, and deer. The data comes from the Wyoming Game and Fish.

Somehow, throughout the criminal activities of Government and rogue non governmental groups to illegally force gray wolves onto the landscape of the Northern Rocky Mountains and the Greater Yellowstone Region, Wyoming was able, through legal channels, to designate the majority of the geographic region of the state as “Wolf Free.” This designation means that in these zones wolves can essentially be killed at any time by any means and without a license.

The data that is compiled comes from those areas where controlling of wolves as a predator, is strictly regulated by state and federal governments. These zones where wolves are protected, at least to some degree, regardless of the lies being perpetuated by government agencies, non government agencies, and the media, are experiencing devastating losses to moose, elk, and deer. The insanity persists that people be forced to live in scarcity to protect a large predator that has no good purpose in people-settled lanscapes.

The lies within the rigged Beast System continue…unchecked.

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Another Half-Million Dollar Wolf Scam

A few years ago I pulled the plug on wasting my time trying to fight a rigged corrupt government system that grows and perpetuates wolves across the landscape of America – a practice that runs contrary to anything that once resembled normalcy and sanity.

At the time I made my announcement, I did hint that I might, from time to time, shine the light on the continued fleecing of hunters and trappers, and tax payers in general, when it comes to gray, red, Mexican, and any other mixed breeds of hybrid, wild canine designed and released into the backyards of Americans in the Northern Rockies, the Southwest, Southeast, and Western Great Lakes regions to perpetuate scarcity.

I more or less keep up with what’s going on. I swallow back my regurgitation when I hear the word wolf, shake my head and head in the other direction. However, I’ll be the first to admit it when I can boldly and proudly write: I told you so.

The other day I was alerted that the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) was asking taxpayers to fork over more than $400,000 a year to count wolves in their state. Please go back a read that again.

You see it wasn’t enough that the state of Idaho, in gutless, silent acquiescence, allowed activists, mostly rogue quasi members of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), to spread wolves throughout their state, they went so far as to arrange things so that the wolves would continue to proliferate only instead of the Federal Government criminals footing the bill, the state of Idaho had to cough up the money to perpetuate wolves and destroy their prized game herds, i.e. elk, deer, and moose. These sportsmen claimed a victory. How so? How are those elk tags going for you? When’s the last time anyone hunted moose?

I’ll get to the “I told you so.” During the process of watching the wolves grow to numbers ginormously exceeding the target number of “recovered” wolves (10 breeding pairs and 100 wolves), the state, with the help of a handful of criminal politicians (aren’t they all?) got the Feds to turn management of wolves over to the state. This, of course, came when wolves in Idaho numbered probably somewhere around 1,000 – who knows for sure? Management involved finding ways to bilk the sportsmen of dollars to fund management, while at the same time their game herds began to nose dive due to wolves slaughtering the choicest of the elk, deer, and moose.

Never fear, the state offered a solution – a “trophy” wolf hunt.

About this time, I railed on the IDFG, laughing in their face at their ignorance that a “trophy” wolf hunt was going to have any effect whatsoever on controlling wolf numbers. I said back then it wouldn’t have any effect and that in about 5-8 years the state would be trying to figure out how they were going to control wolves. They still haven’t figured it out and never will, I’m afraid.

I began writing a multi-part series on the historic challenges that faced countries, cultures, and tribes across the world in their attempts to rid their landscapes of undesired wolves. I later took the time and pieced the multi-part writings into one piece. I called it, “To Catch a Wolf.”

In October of 2014, and again in February of 2017, I published an article about trophy wolf hunts, addressing specifically the claim by ignorant wildlife managers and activists, that offering trophy wolf hunts was somehow going to cause elk, deer, and moose populations to plummet. No, you can’t make this stuff up.

If you are interested in facts about wolves and some of what has transpired that has gotten Idaho to the point they are at now – dwindling game herds and anywhere from 1,000 to 1,500 wolves and god knows how many breeding pairs – please take the time to read the links I’ve provided above.

In the meantime, it appears that citizens of Idaho are about to get shafted once again. They are being asked to supply the inept fish and game department $408,000 a year so they can count wolves. What for?

Mind you, we just learned that the same IDFG used $120,000 to kill elk that the department say are destroying ranchers’ crops. Not only is this fascist regime not giving hunters an opportunity to reduce elk populations in regions the state claims need it, but they are charging the sportsmen so the department can do it themselves or pay others to do it, while donating the meat to food banks. How big of them!

There’s a couple of sayings that come to mind here. One of them goes something like “Burn me once, shame on you. Burn my twice, shame on me.” But then again, perhaps we are well beyond burning twice. I think we’ve reached the point where insanity has crept in and taken over.

I was livid when sportsmen, wolf control activists, IDFG, and politicians agreed to take over management and charge the taxpayers and sportsmen for that privilege. Thanks a lot! More money and more wolves. That worked out real well.

If I was an Idaho citizen, I would place a big fat demand on any notion of providing nearly a half-million dollars to IDFG to count wolves. Here’s the demand.

Presently, depending on which lie you want to believe, there are from 1,000 to 1,500 wolves in Idaho. I don’t know how many breeding pairs. I don’t care how many breeding pairs. There are plain and simple too damned many wolves….period!

When the criminals illegally dumped the wolves on Idaho, they were promised that when there were 10 breeding pairs or 100 wolves, the species would be considered recovered and the state could take over managing wolves so long as they met that requirement. How did that work out for the victims? I thought so.

If the IDFG wants $408,000 to count wolves, give them the money with the understanding that by counting them and knowing where all the wolves are, they can then systematically kill enough wolves, geographically laid out to maintain a certain density and lower the total wolf population back down to 10 breeding pairs and 100 wolves. Anything short of that, IDFG can go pound sand.

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It’s Hard To Believe But The Eyes See True

I did ten miles in the Frank Church a few days ago.. Where the trails I walked since the 70-80s-90s were elk and deer highways. Later on in the late 90s- to 2007-08 those same trails became wolf highways.

Now, the last few years, 2010-2019 those trails are nothing walks them highways. It’s puzzling. I met a couple from Oregon in there and they asked me, where are the elk? I said wolf. And walked on..

Now my thought is this.. IDFG has been lying about elk and deer populations. And not only that, they are lying about wolf population as well.

I think they’re lying about the harvest report data for those three species.. I don’t think IDFG nor the Federal government, USFWS, wants us to know the truth.. Those agencies combined wildlife management has become a tragedy here in Idaho.

Another tragedy is taking place as of yesterday, 10-15-19. IDFG let out 5,000 elk tags for the combined units of 43-44-48-49-50.. They will likely claim 500 elk harvested.

Fortunately, as I was in hunt unit 43-44 yesterday for the day.. The empty camp grounds and THs might possibly mean that IDFGs lies are catching up to them.. The back country has been sterile of wildlife for years. The rural areas private lands are holding some elk..

I did not hear a single shot fired in unit 43. I have not seen magpies nor crows back there in years.. No bear scat, no wolf tracks, coyotes, wolverines, cougars..

It’s hard to believe the obvious mismanagement of wildlife..

I expect the trespassing citations are about to boom.. Because the land holders don’t want elk hunters on their land..

Things have seriously devolved here in Idaho concerning wildlife since 1995.. It’s a tragedy..

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Google The U.N. Environmental Policies Clone The Wildlife News and Wear Your Hip Boots.

Starting around 1980 Purposely mismanage wildlife and fish for years. In 1994 start a wolf population. Continue to mismanage wildlife for years. Make the U.N.E.P. clones look like they know what they’re talking about. Even though they do not. {throughout the 1980s when hunters complain at IDFG scheduled meetings about mismanagement of the big game resource tell the hunter[s] who see the mismanagement polices to shut up.

Somehow those pro wolf groups overlook prior to wolf introduction hunter success rates versus post wolf introduction hunter success rates based upon previous harvest data and previous tag opportunities now reduced by 80% due to wolf population mismanagement in states where wolves have been introduced for years.

Somehow these left wing pro wolf groups overlook game management hunter success rates where hunting management methods have been around for decades. It would be nice if their UNEP cloned attitudes increase the decline in members of their silly group echo chambers..

Sell 5,000 elk tags in an area [48-49-Idaho} that only holds 1600 elk, while the back country around the agricultural lands is sterile of big game animals.

The deep back country of Central Idaho is no longer carrying a respectable number of elk and deer anymore, nor large carnivores.. To me from my experiences traveling Idaho’s back country via horse and mule to no longer see cougars, bears, sows with cubs, black and grey foxes, coyotes, wolverines along with the elk and deer herds, is a far cry from a wolf regenerated success story.. It’s another man made failure of epic proportions..

Throw wolves into a meat grinder then curse at the meat grinder. Isn’t self responsibility for your own advocacy awesome? I think so..

WLNs useful tools want some blowback? You got it..

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Idaho Wolf Trappers Wanted

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Or Maybe We Are All Gonna Die: Possible Grizzly Bear Hunts on the Horizon

Panic is setting in with the environmentalists and animal rights perverts as they learn of two public hearings scheduled to receive input about possibly having limited grizzly bear hunts. Disaster and a slaughter of the grizzly’s population in Idaho will happen, according to bear lovers, because it plans on allowing ONE male bear to be killed…ONE!

“The formula for the number of bears that can be hunted in each state involves a region surrounding Yellowstone National Park called the Demographic Monitoring Area. The number of bears for each state is based on how much land area is in the monitoring area. The number of bears allowed to be hunted in total is based on mortality studies. The result is that this year, Idaho can hunt one male bear and Montana six male bears. Wyoming can hunt 10 male bears and two female bears.”<<<Read More>>>

Officials say they will “educate” hunters on how to identify a male grizzly from a female grizzly. Isn’t it risky to get close enough to a grizzly bear to be able to tell which genitalia they may be sporting? Perhaps if you wait and watch long enough you can watch one of them urinating in order to tell the difference.

But seriously, how difficult is it to identify male and female outside of the obvious? I’ve never hunted them. For that matter, I don’t recall that I’ve ever encountered a grizzly up close and personal. But, I think I could tell a fully mature adult male grizzly from a female. Like with today’s young ‘uns it’s difficult to tell the difference in sexes in immature bears.

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Idaho Draft Wolf Plan

It’s been nearly 30 years since wolves were illegally and maliciously released into the woods of the Northern Rocky Mountains including Central Idaho. Evidently, in that 30 years, Idaho wolf managers have learned nothing and will likely continue with the proliferation of mostly uncontrolled numbers of wolves believing they can offer “recreational opportunities” and magically mitigate any problems with livestock depredations.

Idaho has reached a benchmark time in which, after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) illegally forced wolves onto Idaho against their wills, they are basically finishing up turning over the cost of that management to the citizens of Idaho. They must devise a plan satisfactory to the USFWS. Even though the USFWS has set minimum numbers of wolves the state must maintain – or else the fascist government will place wolves back on the Endangered Species Act list – Idaho appears to have no plan but to not only keep the 800-850 wolves (wink, wink) but to continue to grow the numbers.

Below is an outline of the draft for a new wolf management plan. I have been told that not included in this draft plan is a set number of wolves in which the department intends to target as a maximum number. As was pointed out, how can an honest plan be legitimate without specific target goals?

The person sending this email has suggested that all residents contact their fish and game commissioner and tell them what they expect.

[pdf-embedder url=”http://tomremington.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/IdahoWolfPlan.pdf”]

 

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Kiss Idaho Goodbye

There are a multitude of Idaho non-profits and United Nations (UN) non-governmental organizations (NGO) that are aggressively pursuing connectivity projects. Essentially the goal is to connect large swaths of land in Idaho’s east corner which neighbors Montana and Wyoming. They would love to see this land all locked up into one major landscape of wilderness, for wildlife only.

The High Divide (HD), Crown of the Continent (COC), Yellowstone to Yukon (Y2Y), Greater Yellowstone (GY), and the land trust partnership group Heart of the Rockies Initiative (HOR), are just a few of the organizations that are destructively working to create wildlife corridors in the Island Park area.

Each of these organizations are connected to UN NGOs such as the Nature Conservancy (NC), Wilderness Society (WS), and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). Don’t be fooled by the new UN addition in red, a disclaimer that unless the organization is in consultative status it does not connote affiliation with the UN. That is flat out not true. And like children playing in a sandbox these groups all play with each other, are interconnected, and overwhelm us with their agenda.<<<Read More>>>

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Lolo, Selkirk Elk Study of 2011

[pdf-embedder url=”http://tomremington.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/planLoloSelwayPredation.pdf”]
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By Funding Trophy Wolf Hunts, We’re Destroying Real Game Hunts

wolfutah*Editor’s Note* – This post first appeared on this website on October 8, 2014. It was requested of me to republish it as a means of updating the importance of the article as a prediction of the future.

It seems just a short while ago that wolf (re)introduction happened – 1995 and 1996. A lot of water has passed under the bridge and as the water moved downstream, it has blended in with a lot of other water, not becoming lost but perhaps unrecognizable.

As most of you know, I’m writing a book about wolves. Actually it’s really not about wolves other than to point out the obvious behaviors of the animal. The book is more about the corruption. However, in working to put all this information together, I’ve come across some things that I had written about in which I had actually forgotten.

It really began in early 2009, when there was a glimmer of hope that wolves might come off the Endangered list and residents in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming could begin killing the animal to get it back down to 100 wolves as promised in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. What? Had you forgotten?

Around about that same time, I began reading about the plans Idaho was going to begin formulating in preparation for wolf hunts. I said then that utilizing a season for “trophy” wolf hunting would not work.

I wrote a five-part series that I know some of you have read, perhaps more than once, called “To Catch a Wolf” – an historical account of the extreme difficulty people had throughout history trying to control wolves to stop them from killing livestock and attacking people.

The real joke was when Idaho officials, in a fraudulent attempt to convince anyone who would blindly listen, that trophy hunting wolves, was going to protect the elk, deer and moose herds. This did not happen. As a matter of fact, it so much did not happen, that Idaho Fish and Game took to helicopters to gun down wolves in the Lolo Region because officials were willing to admit there was a wolf problem….or maybe they were just placating the sportsmen. They killed 5 wolves and yet somehow they want sportsmen to believe that a trophy hunting season will protect the game herds?

The myth here is that increasing or decreasing wolf tags will grow or shrink elk, deer and moose herds. Sorry, but controlling elk, deer and moose tags controls elk, deer and moose herds. Select-harvesting a handful of wolves does nothing to protect game herds.

Why, then, are Idaho sportsmen continuing to fund a fraudulent trophy wolf hunting season that may actually be causing the further destruction of the elk, deer and moose they so much wish to protect and grow?

On November 30, 2012, I wrote and published the following article. I took the liberty to embolden some statements I wish to now more fully draw your attention to.

Trophy Hunting Season on Wolves Destroying More Elk, Moose and Deer?

Recently I read a comment made by Bob Ream, chairman of the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) Commission, state that:

We [MFWP] have implemented more and more aggressive wolf harvests. We also increased lion harvests considerably this year.

The word aggressive is certainly an overused adjective used much in the same fashion as say a male peacock when he displays his tail feathers. In the context used in the quote above, I’m assuming Mr. Ream intended his use of the word aggressive to mean something to be proud of, a feat of accomplishment or something related. But when talking about wolves, killing, attacks, predation, hunting, trapping, disease and every aspect associated with gray wolves, “implementing[ed] more and more aggressive wolf harvests” kind of rings a bit hollow.

In its simplest form, wolves, at least under the existing conditions in most of Montana, Idaho and Wildlife, grow and expand at a rate of anywhere between 20% and 30%, I am told and have read as well. Estimates of wolf populations mean little except in political and emotional battles because nobody knows how many there are and they are lying if they tell you otherwise. For the sake of argument, I have read that the tri-state region of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming have at least 6,000 wolves. On the top end I’ve heard 15,000 but I’m going to guess that might be high but then again I don’t live there and spend time in the woods.

If there were 6,000 wolves then math tells us that 1200 – 1800 wolves should be killed each year just to sustain the population at 6,000; and states like Montana, who according to Bob Ream, are aggressively killing more wolves.

But now the question has been brought up that perhaps states offering hunting and trapping seasons, based on the principle of “trophy” and “big game” hunting and trapping, might be causing even more game animals, like elk, moose and deer, to be killed. Is this possible?

It was nearly 4 years ago that I wrote a series, “To Catch a Wolf“. Much of the purpose of that series and other related articles, was to explain how difficult it is to kill a wolf; historically and globally. It’s one of the hardest things to do over a prolonged period of time and that’s why I chuckle at comments like Bob Ream’s when he describes the MFWP actions toward killing wolves as aggressive. There is NOTHING aggressive about trophy hunting wolves.

The process was long and mostly wrought with illegal actions and corruption, but eventually, Montana, Idaho and Wyoming got the infamous and controversial gray wolf removed from protections of the Endangered Species Act and trophy hunting seasons commenced; after all, wasn’t that the target goals of each of the states’ fish and game departments?

And so how’s that “aggressive” hunting and trapping going to reduce wolf populations?

If any of this isn’t complicated and wrought with emotion and irrational thinking enough already, in an email exchange I received today, the idea was presented that hunting a token number of wolves, in other words, managing them as a game species and classified as a trophy animal, might actually be only amounting to breeding a healthier, less stressful wolf that will eat more elk, deer and moose and become an even larger creature than it already is, further capable of killing more and bigger prey.

This idea is based in science, although those who don’t like the science disregard it. The science is the topic of wolf size. Most people are of the thought that a wolf’s size is determined by the species or subspecies the wolf comes from. I’m not going to pretend I have a full grasp of this science but will pass on that the essence of wolf size is determined mostly by food supply.

Consider then this premise to manage wolves as a big game species, which is what is being done in Montana and Idaho. The North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, which includes managing game for surplus harvest, has worked marvelously well over the years, producing in places too many of certain game species. We certainly don’t want that for wolves as the proportion of wolves to prey/game species will soon get all out of whack. Our only hope then, is that the fish and game departments will fail as miserably managing wolves as they have elk, moose and mule/whitetail deer.

There is a reason why honest wildlife managers classify bona fide game animals as such and coyotes (and it should be also wolves) varmints to be shot and killed on site. It’s the only way to keep them at bay. This would be considered an aggressive move toward wolf control. Anything, short of an all out organized program to extirpate the wolf, would work just dandy and would never danger the future existence of this animal.
End

In the years that I have written about wolves, wolf “management” and the political nonsense that goes hand in hand with it, it certainly appears to me that there has become quite an effort among sportsmen to protect THEIR “trophy” wolf hunts. Is that in the best interest of actually regaining a vibrant elk, deer and moose population, that is supposed to be managed for surplus harvest, according to Idaho code?

In its most basic form, at least ask yourself how that “aggressive” trophy wolf hunting is effecting the elk, deer and moose herds? At the same time, what has become and continues to become of those elk tags? There just aren’t enough “trophy” wolf hunters to be effective and supporting the farce perpetuated by Idaho Fish and Game isn’t helping. It’s the same as buying a fifth of gin for a gin-soaked homeless fool.

As was relayed to me today, it seems the, “participants are in a race for the final bull elk or big buck in various units.” That’s the direction it seems we are headed.

Here’s a mini refresher course in promised wolf management. When the Final Environmental Impact Statement was approved, leading to the Final Rule on Wolf Reintroduction, the citizens of the Northern Rocky Mountain Region, where wolves were to be (re)introduced, were promised several things. First, we were promised that wolves would be “recovered,” a viable, self-sustaining population, when 10 breeding pairs and 100 wolves existed in three separate wolf management zones for three consecutive years. Those numbers were achieved by 2003. What happened? Nothing but lawsuits and wolves didn’t finally get delisted until 2011 due to legislative action.

All promises made by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service were based on 30 breeding pairs and 300 wolves. They lied!

Second, citizens of Idaho, Montana and Wyoming were promised that wolves would have no measurable impact on wild game herds. The only thing that might possibly be needed was a slight 10% or less reduction in cow elk tags should the occasion arise for the need to boost elk production in exceptional cases.

So, I ask. How many elk tags have been lost since those promises were made? As a matter of fact, all promises made were reneged on. There is no reason to believe or support anything promised us by government. Stop giving government money to run their con game. At this rate game animals will all be gone soon enough and no hunting opportunities will prevail….except possibly trophy wolf tags.

What will it be. As the old saying goes, “Pay me now or pay me later.”

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