December 3, 2021

Man found dead in Yellowstone attacked by grizzly bear 

The National Park Service says a Montana man found dead in Yellowstone National Park was the victim of a grizzly bear attack.

Source: Man found dead in Yellowstone attacked by grizzly bear | Fox News

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Grizzly bears, wolves killing cattle in western Wyoming

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — It hasn’t taken long for grizzly bears and wolves to start taking a toll on livestock this summer in the Upper Green River drainage in western

Source: Grizzly bears, wolves killing cattle in western Wyoming

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Bears Are Smarter Than Researchers

I laughed my butt off. This just struck me a being really funny. Bwahahahahahahahaha

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Feds Weigh Moving Grizzlies Into Washington

“It marks the potential turning point in the decades-long decline of the last grizzly bears remaining on the U.S. West Coast,” Joe Scott, international conservation director of Conservation Northwest, said in a written statement. “Without recovery efforts, these bears may soon be gone forever.”<<<Read More>>>

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Should You Fear the Pizzly Bear?

*Editor’s Note* – Everyone should consider reading this and then giving it some thought. As Dr. Valerius Geist worded it, in reference to this article: “Excellent article ! It takes something like this to shake us out of our
stupor. In North America the big and the little wolf are melting into one, and it’s only a matter of time before it will happen in the west. Be glad that you knew coyotes and wolves! Your great-grand children will not. The best thing that happened in the 20th century to wolves were 60,000 trappers in Canada and Alaska, encouraged by bounties, killing every wolf they could get by fair means or by foul. It kept wolves and coyotes pure, it contained hydatid disease, it kept wolves out of agricultural and where predator control officers were waiting for them anyway, and it relegated wolf attacks on humans to a myth – by their absence.

The worst enemy of woodland caribou, so argues Tom Bergerud, are environmentalists. Ditto for wolves?

“The animal comes from an area above the Great Lakes, where wolves and coyotes live — and sometimes breed — together. At one end of this canid continuum, there are wolves with coyote genes in their makeup; at the other, there are coyotes with wolf genes. Another source of genetic ingredients comes from farther north, where the gray wolf, a migrant species originally from Eurasia, resides. “We call it canis soup,” says Bradley White, a scientist at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario, referring to the wolf-coyote hybrid population.”<<<Read More>>>

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Petition to Force Grizzly Bears Throughout the West

“WASHINGTON— The Center for Biological Diversity filed a legal petition today calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to greatly expand its plans for recovering grizzly bears, including returning the iconic animals to vast portions of the American West. The petition identifies 110,000 square miles of potential grizzly habitat in places like the Gila/Mogollon complex in Arizona and New Mexico, Utah’s Uinta Mountains, California’s Sierra Nevada and the Grand Canyon in Arizona.”<<<Read More>>>

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When I Hear That Lonesome Whistle……..Damn the Train!

“The GPS collaring project is part of the overall $1 million, five-year Parks Canada-Canadian Pacific Railway joint action plan to try to prevent ongoing deaths of grizzly bears on the train tracks through Banff and Yoho national parks.Trains are the single biggest killer of grizzly bears in Banff National Park. There have been 14 known grizzly bear deaths on the railway in Banff and Yoho since 2000, but that number does not take into account bears that may be struck but never found.”<<<Read More>>>

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Black Bears: “Deadly, Even Predatory Intent”

“Now I’m wondering if I shouldn’t have been more scared of black bears than the better-known grizzly. That is because black bears seem to be attacking humans more and more often these days. In an article in “Sports Afield” several years ago, the writer reported seeing black bears — even sows with cubs numerous times — and noted they almost invariably just wanted to get away or be left alone. So, the chances of being attacked by a black bear are small indeed.

“But while grizzlies get most of the attention and bad press, there actually have been many more negative encounters with black bears. And a significantly high proportion are fatal. Grizzlies do charge and maul and even eat someone on occasion, but much more frequently they make false charges, pop their teeth and growl — then decide to go no further. When black bears decide to get violent, they are much more likely to rush in with deadly, even predatory intent. They also try hard to finish the job.”<<<Read More>>>

The March 2014 edition of Outdoor Life (the print publication) has an article about the increase over the decades of black bear attacks on humans.

OutdoorLife

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Hungry Grizzly Bears in Yellowstone Likely to Cause Increased Human/Bear Encounters

It is a common natural phenomenon that food for wild animals comes in cycles. Ever since I can remember, mast crops, such as wild nuts and berries come in various amounts depending on several things that effect growth.

According to a report by Thomson Reuters Foundation, due to a minimal crop of available foods for grizzly and black bears, Yellowstone Park authorities are warning visitors that bears will be hungry and looking for food. Because of this natural shortage bears are bound to encounter human beings, partly because the humans are a food source….directly or indirectly.

The author of the article has regurgitated the overused excuse, or coveryourass du jour, that the lack of nuts is caused by climate change…..without offering any definition. Invoking “climate change” is kind of like Article 134 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, i.e when you can’t or don’t want to find the truth, simply blame it on climate change.

I remember seeing a poster in the coach’s office in high school when I played football. It read something like this”

Rule #1 The coach is always right.
Rule #2 Refer to Rule #1

This may now be rewritten to read”

Rule #1 Climate change is to blame for everything.
Rule #2 See Rule #1.

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Trophic Cascades from Wolves to Grizzly Bears in Yellowstone?

Commentary by George Dovel

*Editor’s Note* The following is republished on this website with permission from the author. Please consider subscribing to The Outdoorsman. Information can be found in the right sidebar on the home page of this website. Thank you.

In Outdoorsman No. 51, the article on pages 8-9 Titled, “Top Wolf Scientist Charges Wolf Researchers Have Become Advocates Rather Than Scientists,” tells how Dr. L. David Mech charged that when wolf advocates began to claim the wolves’ presence was vital to restore healthy native ecosystems, a large number of university researchers invaded Yellowstone Park with the intention of proving trophic cascades caused by wolves.

Then Mech rebutted their claims with facts. He pointed out that the addition of 27 days of growing season in Yellowstone in recent years undoubtedly created healthier and taller willows and aspens and said there was no scientific evidence that wolves were responsible for creating more food for other predators.
He cited a study of 19 chapters of reviews concerning the ecological role of large carnivores, and said a research team concluded that scientists likely will never be able to predict cascading impacts on biodiversity other than prey. After a review by other wolf scientists, it was then accepted for publication in Biological Conservation on March 12, 2012.

But despite Mech’s pointed claims being published a year ago, a new study by William J. Ripple et al claims that wolves reducing the number of elk browsing on serviceberry provided more food for grizzly bears.

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The Ripple study said it measured 778 bear scats in 2007-2009 and determined from those measurements that the bear stools contained more fruit than were found in older studies before wolves were introduced.
The study also determined that the serviceberry bushes grow taller and have less browsing than were found in previous years. That, of course, correlated with the 27-day annual increase in the Yellowstone Park growing season provided by Mech.

The study published by the British Journal of Animal Ecology on July 29, 2013, included a series of unproven hypotheses that: elk and grizzly bears competed for berry-producing shrubs; after wolves were introduced there would be a decrease in elk and an increase in berry-producing shrubs; and the percent of fruit in the grizzly bear diet would be greater after wolves were introduced.

In reality, the killing or alleged relocation of elk by wolves resulted in far fewer elk available as prey for the grizzly bears when they emerged from hibernation and desperately needed the protein provided by elk prey until green-up occurred.

Such thinly veiled attempts to try to promote the trophic cascade myth illustrate how far science has been prostituted by the current crop of students and professors who lack the wisdom and integrity to be scientists.
—–
I urge Outdoorsman readers to donate any amount, no matter how small, to reimburse us for the cost of providing mailed copies to the elected officials and others who are directly involved in managing your wildlife.

Thank you,
George Dovel

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